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December 18th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 4
work. He said that the last thing urged upon him by Congressmen from the Cotton-producing States, when he left Washington, was to take South Carolina out of the Union instantly. Now, Sir, he said, when the news reaches Washington that we have met here, that a panic arose about a few cases of small-pox in the city, and that we forthwith scampered off to Charleston, the effect would be a little ludicrous. The chivalry of South Carolina did scamper off to Charleston the next morning, December 18, 1860. where they were received with military honors, and at four o'clock in the afternoon re-assembled in Institute Hall. William Porcher miles. At the evening session in Columbia, before their flight, John A. Elmore, of Alabama, and Charles E. Hooker, of Mississippi, were introduced to the Convention as commissioners from their respective States. They successively addressed the Convention in favor of the immediate and unconditional secession of the State; and so anxious was Govern
November 27th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 4
be formed, he said, I could not go with you, for I should use whatever influence I might be able to exert against entering into one with South Carolina, that has been a common brawler and disturber of the peace for the last thirty years, and who would give no security that I would be willing to accept, that she would not be as faithless to the next compact as she has been to this which she is now endeavoring to avoid. Letter of John Minor Botts to H. B. M., Esq., of Staunton, dated November 27, 1860. We may also add the important fact that the great mass of the people, especially of Western Virginia, were too thoroughly loyal to follow the leadings of the politicians into revolutionary ways. Almost a year rolled away, and the same man (Memminger) stood up before a large congregation of citizens in Charleston, November 30, 1860. and, in a speech which perfectly exhibited the power of the politicians over the people of South Carolina, foreshadowed, in distinct outline, the cours
February, 1850 AD (search for this): chapter 4
n the new constitution securing the full right of secession whenever it may be desired by any member of the expected Confederacy? This significant question was answered in, the affirmative, ten years later, by the madmen at Montgomery, who formed such Confederacy and new constitution ; and before the rebellion that ensued was crushed, the Confederacy was in the throes of dissolution, caused by the practical assertion of the right of secession. The passage of the Compromise Act In February, 1850, the representatives of California in Congress asked for the admission of the Territory as a Free-labor State, the inhabitants having formed a State constitution in which Slavery was prohibited. This was in accordance with the doctrine of Popular Sovereignty, accepted by the Slave power as right at that time, and for some years afterward; and yet that power now declared that, if California should be admitted as a Free-labor State, the Slave-labor States should leave the Union. To allay
uthern Confederacy, the Committee appointed to prepare an ordinance of secession reported. This was on the 20th of December. Their report, submitted by Mr. Inglis, was very brief, and embodied the draft of an ordinance, in the following words:-- we, the people of the State of South Carolina, in Convention assembled, do declare and ordain, and it is hereby declared and ordained, that the Ordinance adopted by us in Convention, on the twenty-Third day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight, whereby the Constitution of the United States was ratified, and also all acts and parts of acts of the General Assembly of the State, ratifying amendments of the said Constitution, are hereby repealed, and the Union now Subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved. Signatures of the Committee on Secession Ordinance. This ordinance was immediately adopted by the unanimous voice o
finally took open action in the old Charles G. Memminger. State House at Columbia. The lower House of the South Carolina Legislature, on the 30th of November, 1859, resolved that the Commonwealth was ready to enter, together with other Slave-holding States, or such as desire prompt action, into the formation of a Southern Confederacy. At the request of the Legislature, the Governor of the State sent a copy of this resolution to the Governors of the other Slave-labor States; and in January following, 1860. C. G. Memminger, one of the arch-conspirators of South Carolina, appeared before the General Assembly of Virginia as a special commissioner from his State. His object was to enlist the representatives of Virginia in a scheme of disunion, whilst, with the degrading hypocrisy which has ever characterized the leaders in the Great Rebellion, he professed zealous attachment to the Union. He proposed, in the name of South Carolina, a convention of the Slave-labor States, to co
March 4th (search for this): chapter 4
he South Carolina delegation in Congress, The written communications to the President were signed by the following named persons, then Representatives in Congress from South Carolina:--John McQueen, William Porcher Miles, M. L. Bonham, W. W, Boyce, and Lawrence M. Keitt. that the relative military condition should remain the same, while each party forbore hostile movements. This statement of Miles satisfied the Convention that they might play treason to their hearts' content until the 4th of March; provided, they kept violent hands off the property of the United States. The President, as we shall observe hereafter, denied that he ever gave such pledge, and pronounced the accusation untrue, as it undoubtedly was. After resolutions were offered and referred, which proposed a Provisional Government for the Slave-labor States that might secede, on the basis of the National Constitution; also, to send Commissioners to Washington to negotiate for the cession of the property of the Un
November 30th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 4
s to the next compact as she has been to this which she is now endeavoring to avoid. Letter of John Minor Botts to H. B. M., Esq., of Staunton, dated November 27, 1860. We may also add the important fact that the great mass of the people, especially of Western Virginia, were too thoroughly loyal to follow the leadings of the politicians into revolutionary ways. Almost a year rolled away, and the same man (Memminger) stood up before a large congregation of citizens in Charleston, November 30, 1860. and, in a speech which perfectly exhibited the power of the politicians over the people of South Carolina, foreshadowed, in distinct outline, the course of revolutionary events in the near future. He foretold the exact day when an ordinance of secession would be passed in the coming State Convention; that Commissioners would be sent to Washington to treat on the terms of separation; that the demand would be made for the surrender of the forts in Charleston harbor into the hands of in
January 10th (search for this): chapter 4
y compromises or patch up existing difficulties. The subject will be decided by a convention of the people of my State. Hawkins, of Florida, said:--The day of compromise has passed. I am opposed, and so is my State, to all and every compromise. I shall not vote. Clopton, of Alabama, considered secession as the only remedy for existing evils, and would not sanction any temporizing policy. Pugh, of Alabama, said:--As my State intends following South Carolina out of the Union, by the 10th of January next, I pay no attention to any action taken in this body. No less than fifty-two members from the Slave-labor States refused to vote on this occasion. These comprised all of the South Carolina delegation, and most of those from Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia. By this action, they virtually avowed their determination to thwart all legislation in the direction of compromise or conciliation. And when Mr. Morris, a Democrat from Illinois, offered a resolution, December 4
November 30th, 1859 AD (search for this): chapter 4
estless spirits of South Carolina were quieted, for a while, by the election of Buchanan, in the autumn of 1856. They were disappointed, because they seemed compelled to wait for another pretext for rebellion. But they did not wait. They conferred secretly, on the subject of disunion, with politicians in other Slave-labor States, and finally took open action in the old Charles G. Memminger. State House at Columbia. The lower House of the South Carolina Legislature, on the 30th of November, 1859, resolved that the Commonwealth was ready to enter, together with other Slave-holding States, or such as desire prompt action, into the formation of a Southern Confederacy. At the request of the Legislature, the Governor of the State sent a copy of this resolution to the Governors of the other Slave-labor States; and in January following, 1860. C. G. Memminger, one of the arch-conspirators of South Carolina, appeared before the General Assembly of Virginia as a special commissioner
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