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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 20, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Thompson F. Waddill (search for this): article 7
e cheerful fireside, in the chilly water, surrounded by every gloomy idea of experiencing a wretched death, with no eye of pity to look upon them in their hour of need. One by one the three were carried away, and their spirits took their fight from this life, leaving the friendship of their companions and all the busy world. The names of these worthy men were connected with the Southern Guards of Charles City, and were as follows: Robert Allen Pearce, Edward E. Haines, and Thompson F. Waddill, who was Lieutenant and acting quartermaster, a brother of Major George Waddill of the same body. The two saved providentially were Fleming Binns and Thos. J. Guy. These held on to the wrecked boat until Monday morning, being very much benumbed and unable to speak. Lieut. Waddill was dear associate of mine at an institution of learning in Lynchburg last year, and we have spent many pleasant hours together as college chubs. At the last commencement we parted, but little expect
George Waddill (search for this): article 7
City, and were as follows: Robert Allen Pearce, Edward E. Haines, and Thompson F. Waddill, who was Lieutenant and acting quartermaster, a brother of Major George Waddill of the same body. The two saved providentially were Fleming Binns and Thos. J. Guy. These held on to the wrecked boat until Monday morning, being very much benumbed and unable to speak. Lieut. Waddill was dear associate of mine at an institution of learning in Lynchburg last year, and we have spent many pleasant hours together as college chubs. At the last commencement we parted, but little expected we that it was a separation forever in this life. With a merry heart he toefore your Creator that you were prepared to answer for the "deeds done in the body." Mr. Guy relates, that while he and Mr. Blans were retaining their hold, Waddill, in that critical moment, realizing his perilous situation, cried for Divine aid, and sought mercy from his Father in Heaven. His prevailing cries could be heard
Fleming Binns (search for this): article 7
heir hour of need. One by one the three were carried away, and their spirits took their fight from this life, leaving the friendship of their companions and all the busy world. The names of these worthy men were connected with the Southern Guards of Charles City, and were as follows: Robert Allen Pearce, Edward E. Haines, and Thompson F. Waddill, who was Lieutenant and acting quartermaster, a brother of Major George Waddill of the same body. The two saved providentially were Fleming Binns and Thos. J. Guy. These held on to the wrecked boat until Monday morning, being very much benumbed and unable to speak. Lieut. Waddill was dear associate of mine at an institution of learning in Lynchburg last year, and we have spent many pleasant hours together as college chubs. At the last commencement we parted, but little expected we that it was a separation forever in this life. With a merry heart he took leave of his fond associates and friends. And deeply do we deplore t
forever in this life. With a merry heart he took leave of his fond associates and friends. And deeply do we deplore thy sad fate, our loved friend! It teaches us to prepare. "For the tempest of life when the wave and the gale. Are around and above, when our footing may fail." But it is consoling to believe that before you were called into another being before your Creator that you were prepared to answer for the "deeds done in the body." Mr. Guy relates, that while he and Mr. Blans were retaining their hold, Waddill, in that critical moment, realizing his perilous situation, cried for Divine aid, and sought mercy from his Father in Heaven. His prevailing cries could be heard for some distance, and were heart- piercing. There, while life was about to depart, and he knew his wretched condition, spiritually, he repented of his sins; and after thus offering a most agonizing prayer, (and how earnest must have been that prayer) he felt the forgiveness of God, and was sat
Stone wharf (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 7
For the Richmond Daily Dispatch.the late disaster on James River. The occurrence of a painful disaster, which was mentioned in your paper of yesterday, brought indeed painful intelligence to many friends bereft of their fond association with these estimable young men, who have thus sacrificed their lives upon the alter of their country's freedom. It seems that while crossing the river opposite to Mulberry Island, the sail-boat in which they started out from Stone Wharf ran against an embankment projecting out in the stream, and the boisterous wind and waves capsized the frail vessel, while they were endeavoring to preserve their lives, about 8 o'clock in the night. Thus, white the chilling waves were sweeping over them, and they had succeeded in retaining their hold upon the inverted boat for a greater part of the night, they were encouraging each other to hold on and be of good cheer. The three unfortunate young men, however, said to each other that they were not abl
Mulberry Island (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
For the Richmond Daily Dispatch.the late disaster on James River. The occurrence of a painful disaster, which was mentioned in your paper of yesterday, brought indeed painful intelligence to many friends bereft of their fond association with these estimable young men, who have thus sacrificed their lives upon the alter of their country's freedom. It seems that while crossing the river opposite to Mulberry Island, the sail-boat in which they started out from Stone Wharf ran against an embankment projecting out in the stream, and the boisterous wind and waves capsized the frail vessel, while they were endeavoring to preserve their lives, about 8 o'clock in the night. Thus, white the chilling waves were sweeping over them, and they had succeeded in retaining their hold upon the inverted boat for a greater part of the night, they were encouraging each other to hold on and be of good cheer. The three unfortunate young men, however, said to each other that they were not abl
Charles City (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
hat they were not able to continue holding on, that they must perish there, away from the cheerful fireside, in the chilly water, surrounded by every gloomy idea of experiencing a wretched death, with no eye of pity to look upon them in their hour of need. One by one the three were carried away, and their spirits took their fight from this life, leaving the friendship of their companions and all the busy world. The names of these worthy men were connected with the Southern Guards of Charles City, and were as follows: Robert Allen Pearce, Edward E. Haines, and Thompson F. Waddill, who was Lieutenant and acting quartermaster, a brother of Major George Waddill of the same body. The two saved providentially were Fleming Binns and Thos. J. Guy. These held on to the wrecked boat until Monday morning, being very much benumbed and unable to speak. Lieut. Waddill was dear associate of mine at an institution of learning in Lynchburg last year, and we have spent many pleasant
land since the first of last month until Saturday last, when daylight showed up six large vessels off the fort, and it was supposed that our allotment of the "armada" had arrived, but the following night three of them disappeared. They are trying to be as mysterious as possible in their movements. Events are thickening, and the next few weeks may decide the blockade question. By-the-bye, the English papers have made positive assertions that some of our ports would be open in October. November is upon as, and no such result has been attained. Have we been waiting for England to make good that assertion? Enough has been said. Action should now be the watch word The news from Columbus is encouraging; that from Savannah is exciting. Last night, at 10 o'clock, the 7th Alabama regiment, Col Wood, received marching orders, and this morning they are on their way to Chattanooga, for the purpose of looking after the Union men, who are committing depredations, such as bridge b
ff the island since the first of last month until Saturday last, when daylight showed up six large vessels off the fort, and it was supposed that our allotment of the "armada" had arrived, but the following night three of them disappeared. They are trying to be as mysterious as possible in their movements. Events are thickening, and the next few weeks may decide the blockade question. By-the-bye, the English papers have made positive assertions that some of our ports would be open in October. November is upon as, and no such result has been attained. Have we been waiting for England to make good that assertion? Enough has been said. Action should now be the watch word The news from Columbus is encouraging; that from Savannah is exciting. Last night, at 10 o'clock, the 7th Alabama regiment, Col Wood, received marching orders, and this morning they are on their way to Chattanooga, for the purpose of looking after the Union men, who are committing depredations, such a
ations at Fort Pickens--increase of the Blockading fleet — military Restrictions — anecdote of Gen. Bragg. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] "Live Oak Camp." Near Pensacola, Fla., Nov.on. These comprise the 5th and 8th Mississippi regiments. This portion of the army under Gen. Bragg is in good trim, and well disciplined for volunteers, and as a general thing are well satisfiewe are deprived of one strong inducement to fight. " I must give you a little anecdote of Gen. Bragg. Before the commencement of hostilities last spring, on the occasion of a visit to Fort Pickey fine and well stocked "liquor case," at the same time remarking, "When you take me prisoner, Gen. Bragg, I suppose you will allow me the possession of my liquor case"--Gen. Bragg replied, "CertainlyGen. Bragg replied, "Certainly, sir." Well, you are aware that Major V. was taken prisoner by our troops on their recent visit to the island. On the occasion of the Major being presented to Gen B. as a prisoner of war, the Genera
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