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rstood that they will preserve their old organizations undisturbed. Whilst this is the policy of our enemies, all eyes are turned to the Congress, and every patriot is anxiously solicitous to know the character of its legislation; for all feel that upon Congress hangs the fate of the country. I would again earnestly entreat them to lose no time in perfecting the military bill. Sixty days more and we may expect the campaign to begin. McClellan moved in 1862 as soon as March opened; whilst Hooker delayed until April only because a wide river intervened between him and us. There is, let me say again, no time for delay. Mosby, the gallant guerilla chief, is constantly disturbing and harassing the enemy. Within the last week he has sent in three lots of prisoners, numbering some seventy-five, and has captured over one hundred horses and mules, besides the arms and equipments of the men taken. He is doing us valuable service. A gentleman told me in Fauquier, last fall, as the arm
sand might be raised, but a million was driving it a little too strong. Mr. Wilson thought a hundred thousand recruits against Lee's veterans would stand no chance at all. The subject was dropped. In the Senate, on the 18th, a bill was submitted and referred, providing for the establishment of a Bureau of Emancipation, under the Secretary of the Treasury. The resolution for the expulsion of Senator Davis, of Ky., was referred to the Judiciary Committee. Joint resolutions of thanks to Hooker, Meade, Howard, Banks, and Burnside, were passed. Awful disaster in child Cathedral destroyed by fire--two thousand women burnt to death. An awful disaster occurred in Santiago, the capital of Chili, on the 8th of December. The Immaculate Conception was being celebrated in the church of the Jesuits. It was about 7 o'clock in the evening and the crescent of light (gas) that formed the pedestal for the Virgin Mary fired the wood upon which it rested, and the flames sprung wildly over
lain in battle, every woman has offered herself up on the altar of her country, when every State south of the Potomac is a desert of ashes and of corpses — then, and then only, may the North take possession. Those who think that there is a Providence that rules the world will not believe in the possibility of such a catastrophe. The people of the North are all jubilant just now at the late successes of their armies. The disastrous defeats of the armies of McClellan, Pope, Burnside and Hooker plunged them not very long ago into the depths of despair. In presuming on the subjugation of the South because Lee has retired and Vicksburg has fallen, they are as much in the wrong as they were in regarding these Southern victories as decisive of the war. With such power of raising armies, and with so vast an extent of ground on which to deploy them, the war must go on indefinitely, so long as either North or South choose to continue it. The fall of Vicksburg, of Port Hudson, and th
The Daily Dispatch: February 10, 1864., [Electronic resource], The demonstration on the Peninsula — Withdrawal of the Yankees from New Kent C. H. (search)
artillery opening fire. The Secretary of the Treasury has issued an order permitting the free transportation of merchandize into Western Virginia, and moving all restrictions therefrom within the military lines. Rumors of changes in the command of the Army of the Potomac are quite numerous in the camps. On the one hand, it is said that Gen. Hunter is to have the place now occupied by Gen. Meade. On the other, it is surmised the Gen. Thomas is to be the new commander, and that Gen. Hooker is to take the latter's place in the West. Gold in New York 157½. The inauguration of the officers chosen by the State Convention of Arkansas, took place on the 21st ult., in the Senate Chamber at Little Rock, Ark. It was a most solemn and imposing affair, according to Yankee accounts. Orders have been issued in Washington, prohibiting the publication of the names of any prisoners who may hereafter be sent to the Old Capitol Prison. No reason is assigned for this proceedin
Commander in-Chief, and because a court martial is to be called, and, as he may be one of the judges, he does not wish to prejudge the case. I could not understand whether Gen. McClellan desired the court marshal, or whether it was to be ordered by the Government. He was clearly disappointed that Richmond was not taken; but whether it was the fault of Gen. McClellan, Gen. McDowell, or the interference of the Government, General Scott declined to give an opinion. Of Gens. Burnside and Hooker, and other commanders of that stamp, he regarded them as loyal men, brave men, good division commanders, but wholly incompetent to plan or execute a military campaign. Of Gen. Grant he expressed himself surprised and delighted. He said he knew Gen. Grant in the war with Mexico, and where he was a Lieutenant, and had no opportunity to distinguish himself. So far Gen. Grant had proved himself the hero of the war — fighting great battles with consummate skill, and securing the results. And
Mr. Johnson said he should vote for the bill, leaving it to the President to name the officer for the position. He defended General Halleck, saying that he conducted the Corinth campaign successfully. As regards the Army of the Potomac, the faith of that army showed its undying loyalty and steadfastness. Since that army has been in the field it has lost one hundred thousand men. The public has been dissatisfied alternately with its different com manders — with McClellan, Burnside, Hooker, and Meade — but its not having conflicts success was was not the fault of General Halleck. When McClellan had conducted that uncesseful campaign up to Williamsburg, and designed that 60,000 men should be marched from here to form a junction with him, and close in Lee's army, leaving 90,000 here to defend Washington from any possible attack-- which he did not believe there was at all any possible danger of-- it was not General Halleck that prevented the movement. With regard to the battles
The New "On to Richmond." The Yankees have for three years endeavored to capture Richmond by conquering the Confederate army in its front, but they have now changed their tactics, and are endeavoring to conquer Gen. Lee's army by capturing Richmond. Their present policy is based upon the repeated, prolonged, and total failures of every other means of accomplishing their purposes. Scott, McDowell, McClellan, Pope, Hooker, Burnside, and Meade have all failed to overthrow the living bulwarks of the Confederate soldiers in open field fighting, and the Grand Northern Army of the Potomac, shorn of its original strength and glory, is only too happy if it can secure the capital at Washington from a Confederate advance. The public men and public speakers of every grade, in and out of the Federal Congress, argue that nothing can be done towards "crushing the rebellion" till the rebel armies are crushed. But how to do it — that's weak point, and think they have found it, in our general
mpossible, but is finally unhoped for Burnside, under the especial encouragement and guidance of the President, sustained a defeat that strengthened the rebellion to as great an extent as an accession of one hundred thousand men would have done. Hooker — also under the especial encouragement of the President — sustained a defeat even worse than that of his predecessor. He had it in his power to utterly annihilate the favorite army of the rebellion, and could have promenaded into the enemy's caen and dispirited remnant of an army that had expected to end the war in our Northern cities. Meade is still retained in his position by the President, though the escape of Lee in July proved his utter incompetency as a commander Pope, Burnside, Hooker, and Meade — this is the list of the President's Generals. The first three names represent a slaughter of sixty thousand men. Not one of these men gained a point that brought us any nearer to the end of the war. Every one of them added at least <
was foolish. censor has been established at the telegraph office, and he has wisely suppressed every dispatch saying a word about the war. But a servant girl comes in with a hurried scrawl on a torn sheet of delicately-scented French paper, in a lady's hand: "George H. Montgomery, Fifth Avenue Hotel New York. Do come home at once — Mary cannot live twenty-four hours longer. Laura Montgomery." How can be stop, that? But George H. Montgomery is a myth, and Mary's illness means Hooker's defeat, and the hotel clerk has been instructed to send any such dispatch by the speediest means to somebody's bank down town; and the firm makes the money, and the Government censors keeps blinking like an owl over the dispatches, and rigidly stopping "everything relating to the war;" and Mr. Stanton felicitate himself over having made those newspaper pests send their accounts by mall rather than by telegraph! "How little sense it takes to run a Government," said some wise man. Once,
ange C. H., April 11. --Dates to the 8th have been received here. The following is a synopsis: Thurlow Weed thinks the Yankee Congress resolutions in regard to Mexico will throw Napoleon and Maximilian into the arms of the rebels. The Republicans carried the gubernatorial election in Rhode Island by a small majority. The Emancipations carried Maryland on the 6th by an overwhelming majority. The 11th and 12th army corps are consolidated into the 20th army corps, and Hooker is to command it. A telegram from Baltimore on the 7th says the movements of troops are very active there. Guerillas burnt a steamboat ten miles below Memphis on the 2d. Advices from New Orleans report that the Mobile ram Tennessee was recently sunk in a gale near Grant's Pass. The New Jersey Legislature refuses to allow soldiers to vote. Henry Clay's widow, aged 83, is dead. Admiral Porter's fleet captured 40,000 bales of cotton on Red river. An official d
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