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ted for aid to soldiers' families, and the selectmen were authorized to apply the same as their judgment may dictate. 1862. March 3d, The committee appointed in April preceding reported that they had expended one thousand three hundred and forty-nine dollars and seventy-seven cents for Captain Luther Stephenson, Jr., Company I, to have been taken by the town in its corporate capacity, except to appropriate money when it was necessary. 1865. In the warrant for the annual town-meeting in April was an article to see if the town would authorize the selectmen to borrow money to pay bounties to keep the quota of the town filled. During the proceedings of th62, 1863, and 1864 was Josiah O. Bonney; in 1865, Seth Whitman. 1861. A legal town meeting was held May 3d, at which it was voted to reduce the sum voted at the April meeting for school purposes, two hundred dollars, and to appropriate the same for aid to soldiers' families; also, to pay to each volunteer from that town twenty-f
nited-States service. August 30th, The town ratified the action of the selectmen in paying a bounty of two hundred dollars under the vote of July 30th. On the 6th of September, voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to volunteers enlisting for nine months service. 1863. March 2d, Nothing of special interest relating to the war appears to have been done by the town in its corporate capacity. The selectmen kept on recruiting and filling demands made upon the town for men. 1864. January—, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting for three years service, and were directed to proceed in the matter as soon as they may deem expedient. August 2d, The selectmen were authorized to make a deposit of five hundred dollars in the State treasury to procure volunteers to be credited to the town. Only two were obtained, at a cost of two hundred and fifty dollars; the balance of the money was repaid to the town.
the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer. Voted, to authorize the selectmen to pay to those volunteers who enlisted in May, 1861, whatever may be legally due them by reason of the vote passed May 4th of the same year. June 18th, Voted, to appropriate two hundred dollars to give a fitting reception to the returned soldiers whose terms of service have expired or are about to expire. A committee of arrangements to carry the vote into effect was appointed. 1865. March 6th, The town-treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding eight thousand dollars for aid to the dependants of volunteers. October 31st, Voted, to refund the money contributed by individual citizens to encourage recruiting in the year 1864. Scituate furnished two hundred and sixty-four men for the war, which was a surplus of twenty-seven over and above all demands. Six were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, exclus
June 4th, 1686 AD (search for this): chapter 13
ousand four hundred and ninety-one dollars and eighty-five cents ($6,491.85). The further sum of seventeen hundred and eighty-eight dollars was raised by private subscription to aid recruiting. The amount of money paid by the town for State aid during the war to the families of volunteers, and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $408.57; in 1862, $2,195.49; in 1863, $3,227.64; in 1864, $1,919.00; in 1865, $1,003.87. Total amount, $8,754.57. Rochester Incorporated June 4, 1686. Population in 1860, 1,232; in 1865, 1,156. Valuation in 1860, $592,766; in 1865, $547,181. The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were James H. Clark, John Blackmer, Samuel T. Braley; in 1863, James H. Clark, John Blackmer, John H. Clark; in 1864, John H. Clark, John Blackmer, Nahum F. Morse; in 1865, John Blackmer, John H. Clark, Nahum F. Morse. The town-clerk during all these years was Theophilus King. The town-treasurer during the same period was Robert C. Randall. 1861. The firs
ry during this year in order to fill the demands made by the Government for more men. 1864. March 7th, Voted, to raise by taxation a sum not exceeding five thousand dollars to pay bounties to volum each school-district was chosen to help the selectmen to recruit to fill our quota. 1864. March 7th, Voted, to direct the selectmen to give those nine-months men who paid their poll tax in 1862 g interest at the rate of one mill per annum. 1864. At the annual town-meeting held on the 7th of March, it was voted that the income of the Hatch fund be appropriated for the benefit of soldiers' and be credited to the quota of the town. This was continued to the end of the war. 1865. March 7th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money sufficient to pay State aid to soldiers' familie State aid to the families of drafted men that is paid to the families of volunteers. 1864. March 7th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow a sum not exceeding six thousand dollars to be expende
March 16th (search for this): chapter 13
e hundred dollars. August 22d, The bounty to volunteers for nine months service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. It was also recommended that the recruits of West and East Bridgewater unite and form a company for nine months service; also, that the whole town attend the meeting on Wednesday evening next at Agricultural Hall, Bridgewater, to encourage recruiting. Another meeting for a similar purpose was held on the 2d of September, and to create a volunteer fund. 1863. March 16th, Voted, to omit the poll tax on all soldiers and sailors belonging to the town in the United-States service, if it can be done legally. November 3d, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men. 1864. March 14th, Voted, to continue the payment of State aid to soldiers' families, and to raise fifteen hundred dollars by taxation to refund money paid by citizens to encourage recruiting; also, five hundred dollars to pay bounties to re-enlisted veterans cred
October 31st (search for this): chapter 13
listed in May, 1861, whatever may be legally due them by reason of the vote passed May 4th of the same year. June 18th, Voted, to appropriate two hundred dollars to give a fitting reception to the returned soldiers whose terms of service have expired or are about to expire. A committee of arrangements to carry the vote into effect was appointed. 1865. March 6th, The town-treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding eight thousand dollars for aid to the dependants of volunteers. October 31st, Voted, to refund the money contributed by individual citizens to encourage recruiting in the year 1864. Scituate furnished two hundred and sixty-four men for the war, which was a surplus of twenty-seven over and above all demands. Six were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive of State aid, was twenty thousand and ninety-three dollars and nine cents ($20,093.09). The amount of money paid by the town duri
March 14th (search for this): chapter 13
army belonging to the town; also, to pay State aid to their families as before, and to the families of deceased soldiers. July 30th, Voted, to pay the same aid to the families of drafted men that is paid to the families of volunteers. 1864. March 14th, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of volunteers from the time they leave town and go to camp. April 28th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow seven thousand dollars for war purposes. June 10th, The selectmen werch 16th, Voted, to omit the poll tax on all soldiers and sailors belonging to the town in the United-States service, if it can be done legally. November 3d, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men. 1864. March 14th, Voted, to continue the payment of State aid to soldiers' families, and to raise fifteen hundred dollars by taxation to refund money paid by citizens to encourage recruiting; also, five hundred dollars to pay bounties to re-enlisted veterans cr
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