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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,024 total hits in 480 results.

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George W. Summers (search for this): article 9
Hon. George W. Summers. --A telegraphic dispatch from Washington to the New York Herald, speaking of the Union sentiment in this State, says: "Accounts from Virginia indicate a steady invigoration of the Union sentiment in Western Virginia. Geo. W. Summers has boldly sided with the unconditional Union men, and is said to be as decided against secession as John S. Carlile. Hon. George W. Summers. --A telegraphic dispatch from Washington to the New York Herald, speaking of the Union sentiment in this State, says: "Accounts from Virginia indicate a steady invigoration of the Union sentiment in Western Virginia. Geo. W. Summers has boldly sided with the unconditional Union men, and is said to be as decided against secession as John S. Carlile.
John S. Carlile (search for this): article 9
Hon. George W. Summers. --A telegraphic dispatch from Washington to the New York Herald, speaking of the Union sentiment in this State, says: "Accounts from Virginia indicate a steady invigoration of the Union sentiment in Western Virginia. Geo. W. Summers has boldly sided with the unconditional Union men, and is said to be as decided against secession as John S. Carlile.
Richard Washington (search for this): article 9
Hon. George W. Summers. --A telegraphic dispatch from Washington to the New York Herald, speaking of the Union sentiment in this State, says: "Accounts from Virginia indicate a steady invigoration of the Union sentiment in Western Virginia. Geo. W. Summers has boldly sided with the unconditional Union men, and is said to be as decided against secession as John S. Carlile.
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
Hon. George W. Summers. --A telegraphic dispatch from Washington to the New York Herald, speaking of the Union sentiment in this State, says: "Accounts from Virginia indicate a steady invigoration of the Union sentiment in Western Virginia. Geo. W. Summers has boldly sided with the unconditional Union men, and is said to be as decided against secession as John S. Carlile.
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 9
Texas horsemen. Among the Texas troops here are some of the best horsemen in the world, who, as guerrilla soldiers, would be invaluable. There are Indian fighters from Texas, who, at full speed, can raise an infantry soldier from the ground, scalp him, and throw him away without arresting the rush of the horse. A body of these warriors on the borders of Ohio and Pennsylvania would be invaluable.
The murder of Jackson, at Alexandria. --Hon. Walter Lennox, Ex-Mayor of Washington, and Capt. Barry, U. S. Navy, who were in the Marshall House, at Alexandria, at the time of the murder of Jackson, and came near being sacrificed in the blind fury of the ruffians who enacted the tragedy, were in the city yesterday, at the Exchange, and could have given a deal of information about the affair, and the heroism of Mrs. Jackson after the murder of her brave husband, but the Reporter of the Dispatch could not find them, though he made some half dozen journeys for that express purpose. A true history of that deed of blood may yet be given to the public.
James Jackson (search for this): article 9
The murder of Jackson, at Alexandria. --Hon. Walter Lennox, Ex-Mayor of Washington, and Capt. Barry, U. S. Navy, who were in the Marshall House, at Alexandria, at the time of the murder of Jackson, and came near being sacrificed in the blind fury of the ruffians who enacted the tragedy, were in the city yesterday, at the ExchJackson, and came near being sacrificed in the blind fury of the ruffians who enacted the tragedy, were in the city yesterday, at the Exchange, and could have given a deal of information about the affair, and the heroism of Mrs. Jackson after the murder of her brave husband, but the Reporter of the Dispatch could not find them, though he made some half dozen journeys for that express purpose. A true history of that deed of blood may yet be given to the public. xchange, and could have given a deal of information about the affair, and the heroism of Mrs. Jackson after the murder of her brave husband, but the Reporter of the Dispatch could not find them, though he made some half dozen journeys for that express purpose. A true history of that deed of blood may yet be given to the public.
Walter Lennox (search for this): article 9
The murder of Jackson, at Alexandria. --Hon. Walter Lennox, Ex-Mayor of Washington, and Capt. Barry, U. S. Navy, who were in the Marshall House, at Alexandria, at the time of the murder of Jackson, and came near being sacrificed in the blind fury of the ruffians who enacted the tragedy, were in the city yesterday, at the Exchange, and could have given a deal of information about the affair, and the heroism of Mrs. Jackson after the murder of her brave husband, but the Reporter of the Dispatch could not find them, though he made some half dozen journeys for that express purpose. A true history of that deed of blood may yet be given to the public.
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
Landing of Federal troops near Fredericksburg. --The Fredericksburg Herald publishes the following, which was received in that place at 3½ o'clock on Tuesday afternoon; A courier just arrived reports that the enemy are landing in considerable numbers at Chapawamsic Creek, on the Potomac. This is some 6 miles above Acquia Creek, and about 21 miles from Fredericksburg. We give the report for what it is worth. A small steamer captured a schooner, on which, it is believed, there we --The Fredericksburg Herald publishes the following, which was received in that place at 3½ o'clock on Tuesday afternoon; A courier just arrived reports that the enemy are landing in considerable numbers at Chapawamsic Creek, on the Potomac. This is some 6 miles above Acquia Creek, and about 21 miles from Fredericksburg. We give the report for what it is worth. A small steamer captured a schooner, on which, it is believed, there were armed men, off the point early this morning.
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
Landing of Federal troops near Fredericksburg. --The Fredericksburg Herald publishes the following, which was received in that place at 3½ o'clock on Tuesday afternoon; A courier just arrived reports that the enemy are landing in considerable numbers at Chapawamsic Creek, on the Potomac. This is some 6 miles above Acquia Creek, and about 21 miles from Fredericksburg. We give the report for what it is worth. A small steamer captured a schooner, on which, it is believed, there were armed men, off the point early this morning.
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