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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1..

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Lott M. Morrill (search for this): chapter 9
late in the small hours of Sunday morning, March 3, 1861. the Crittenden Compromise was finally rejected by a vote of twenty against nineteen. The vote was as follows:-- ayes.--Messrs. Bayard, Bright, Bigler, Crittenden, Douglas, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Thompson, Wigfall--19. noes.--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Chandler, Clarke, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkie, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Harlan, King. Morrill, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull. Wade, Wilkinson, Wilson--20. It might have been carried had the conspirators retained their seats. The question was then taken in the Senate on a resolution of the House of Representatives, to amend the Constitution so as to prohibit forever any amendment of that instrument interfering with slavery in any State. This resolution was adopted. In the atmosphere of to-day, made clear by the tempest of war, we perceive that this result was most auspicious. We
John A. King (search for this): chapter 9
ty, and to throw off your oppressive and cursed yoke, and never cease the mortal strife until our whole white race is extinguished, and our fair land given over to desolation. You may have ships of war, and we may have none. You may blockade our ports and lock up our commerce. We can live, if need be, without commerce. But when you shut out our cotton from the looms of Europe, we shall see whether other nations will not have something to say and something to do on that subject. Cotton is King! and it will find means to raise your blockade and disperse your ships. Iverson prudently kept himself away from all personal danger during the war that ensued; and in less than a year he saw his overrated monarch dethroned, and heard the cry of the great distress of his own people. His truculent colleague, Toombs, had already, as we have seen, gone home to work the machinery by which the people of Georgia were unwillingly placed in an attitude of rebellion. Toombs had also been bringing
William Early (search for this): chapter 9
Iverson prudently kept himself away from all personal danger during the war that ensued; and in less than a year he saw his overrated monarch dethroned, and heard the cry of the great distress of his own people. His truculent colleague, Toombs, had already, as we have seen, gone home to work the machinery by which the people of Georgia were unwillingly placed in an attitude of rebellion. Toombs had also been bringing one of his Northern admirers in subserviency to his feet, in this wise:--Early in January, it became known to the Superintendent of the Metropolitan Police of New York, who were not under the control of the Mayor, that large quantities of arms, purchased of Northern manufacturers and merchants, were going southward. It was resolved to rut a stop to traffic that would evidently prove injurious to the Government, and late in the month January 22, 1861. nearly forty boxes of arms, consigned to parties in Georgia and Alabama, and placed on board the steamer Monticello, b
iles Taylor, of Louisiana, who took the occasion to warn the men of the Free-labor States of the peril of offending the cotton interest. He assured them that France and England would break any blockade that might be instituted, and that all the Border Slave-labor States would join those farther South in making war upon the National Government, if any attempt was made to coerce a State, as the enforcement of law was falsely termed. His remarks became so offensive to loyal ears, that Representative Spinner, from the interior of New York, interrupted him, saying, I think it is high time to put a stop to this countenancing treason in the halls of legislation. He made it a point of order whether it was competent for a member of Congress, sworn to support the Constitution and laws, to openly advocate treason against the Republic, and justify the seizure of forts and arsenals belonging to it by armed insurgents. The Speaker allowed Taylor to proceed; and he finished his harangue by a form
January 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 9
ttitude of rebellion. Toombs had also been bringing one of his Northern admirers in subserviency to his feet, in this wise:--Early in January, it became known to the Superintendent of the Metropolitan Police of New York, who were not under the control of the Mayor, that large quantities of arms, purchased of Northern manufacturers and merchants, were going southward. It was resolved to rut a stop to traffic that would evidently prove injurious to the Government, and late in the month January 22, 1861. nearly forty boxes of arms, consigned to parties in Georgia and Alabama, and placed on board the steamer Monticello, bound for Savannah, were seized by the New York police. The fact was immediately telegraphed to Governor Brown, at Milledgeville. Toombs was there, and took the matter into his own hands. He telegraphed January 24. as follows to the Mayor of New York:--Is it true that arms, intended for, and consigned to the State of Georgia, have been seized by public authorities in
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 9
le sentiments. The members from the seceding States, with a single exception, sent up to the Speaker brief notices of their withdrawal. These were laid silently upon the table when read, and were no further noticed. Almost imperceptibly those traitors disappeared from the Legislative Hall. The exception referred to was Miles Taylor, of Louisiana, who took the occasion to warn the men of the Free-labor States of the peril of offending the cotton interest. He assured them that France and England would break any blockade that might be instituted, and that all the Border Slave-labor States would join those farther South in making war upon the National Government, if any attempt was made to coerce a State, as the enforcement of law was falsely termed. His remarks became so offensive to loyal ears, that Representative Spinner, from the interior of New York, interrupted him, saying, I think it is high time to put a stop to this countenancing treason in the halls of legislation. He mad
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
se were, Benjamin Fitzpatrick and Clement C. Clay, Jr., of Alabama; R. W. Johnson and William K. Sebastian, of Arkansas; Robeliberty to divulge, were telegraphed to the conventions of Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. He said there was much discussame day when Davis left the Senate, the representatives of Alabama and Florida in that House formally withdrew. Yulee and Ma spoke in temperate language; but Clement C. Clay, Jr., of Alabama, one of the most malignant foes of the Republic, and who w announce, for my colleague and myself, that the people of Alabama have adopted an Ordinance of Separation, and that they arelement C. Clay, Jr. that this is the act of the people of Alabama. See an account of the opposition of the people to seceates, and closed by saying: As a true and loyal citizen of Alabama, approving of her action, acknowledging entire allegiance,y forty boxes of arms, consigned to parties in Georgia and Alabama, and placed on board the steamer Monticello, bound for Sav
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
emains for me to bid you a final adieu. Davis then left the Senate Chamber, and immediately entered more openly upon his treasonable work, in which he had been engaged for many years. On the same day when Davis left the Senate, the representatives of Alabama and Florida in that House formally withdrew. Yulee and Mallory, the Florida Senators, spoke in temperate language; but Clement C. Clay, Jr., of Alabama, one of the most malignant foes of the Republic, and who was a secret plotter in Canada, during the war, of high crimes against the people of the United States, signalized his withdrawal by a harangue marked by the intensest venom., He commenced his speech by the utterance. of what he knew to be untrue, by saying:--I rise to announce, for my colleague and myself, that the people of Alabama have adopted an Ordinance of Separation, and that they are all in favor of withdrawing from the Union. I wish it to be understood Clement C. Clay, Jr. that this is the act of the people
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Legislature was purged of its more disloyal elements, and thenceforth, during the remaining month of the session, its legitimate business was attended to. There were turbulent and disloyal spirits left in that body, but they were less demonstrative, and were shorn of their power to do serious mischief. The Union men were now in the majority in the Lower House, and they controlled the Senate. Before the session closed, acts were passed for the organization of three new Territories, namely, Colorado, Nevada, and Dakotah. Not a word was said about Slavery in those Territories. The subject was left for decision to the people, when they should make a State Constitution. This silence was expressive of the honest determination of the party just rising into power, not to meddle with Slavery by means of the National Government, but leave it, as it always had been left, a subject for municipal law alone. In this behavior the South might have seen, if they had not been blinded by passion an
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ll, of Louisiana; Jefferson Davis and Albert G. Brown, of Mississippi; John Hemphill and Lewis T. Wigfall, of Texas; and David L. Yulee and Stephen R. Mallory, of Florida.), who, at that time, resolved, in effect, to assume to themselves the political power of the South, and to control all political and military operations for the 61. These resolutions, and others which the correspondent did not feel at liberty to divulge, were telegraphed to the conventions of Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. He said there was much discussion concerning the propriety of the members of Congress from seceding States retaining their seats, in order to embarrass legislate openly upon his treasonable work, in which he had been engaged for many years. On the same day when Davis left the Senate, the representatives of Alabama and Florida in that House formally withdrew. Yulee and Mallory, the Florida Senators, spoke in temperate language; but Clement C. Clay, Jr., of Alabama, one of the most mali
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