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January 6th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 6
asserts that Hancock selected the position, and that he (Sickles), with his corps, did all the fighting at Gettysburg. So, I presume, before long it will be clearly proved that my presence on the field was rather an injury than otherwise. The President has written me that he desires to see me upon the subject of executing deserters; so, as soon as I can get time, I shall have to go up to Washington. To John Sergeant Meade: Son of General Meade. Headquarters army of the Potomac, January 6, 1864. We have now at headquarters Collis's Zu-Zu Regiment, commanded by one of the Bowens, Collis being in command of a brigade in the Third Corps. They have a fine band, one of the best in the army. A good many of the old volunteers have re-enlisted—more than I expected—and if Congress allows the bounty hitherto paid, many more will re-enlist. To Mrs. George G. Meade: Willard's hotel, Sunday, February 14, 1864—7 P. M. I felt very badly at leaving you, but I tried to reconcil<
December 25th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 6
ur lives were lost, and several bruised, we received no material injury, and our boat continued on. For a time, however, before the extent of the injury was known, there was much alarm and excitement on board our boat, which was unusually crowded, owing to the ice on the Potomac. The great subject of discussion in the army is the recent relieving of General Butler. General Benjamin F. Butler, commanding the Federal troops, failed to take Fort Fisher, Wilmington, N. C., and withdrew Dec. 25, 1864. He was relieved by the President, on Grant's request. The particular cause had not been made public. It is hardly necessary I should tell you how much I have suffered since I left you. All I can do is earnestly to pray God to have mercy on dear Sergeant and yourself, and to give you strength to bear up under the affliction you are visited with. My heart is too full to write more. Headquarters army of the Potomac, January 14, 1865. I am sorry to hear what you write people say
February 4th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
ate Galatea, and they have kept me up so late that I cannot write as much as I would wish. I thought my last visit was, excepting dear Sergeant's Son of General Meade. sickness, most happy, but I cannot be happy and see my noble boy suffering as he does. I think of him all the time, and feel at times like asking to be relieved, that I may go home and help you nurse him. May God in his infinite mercy restore him to health, is my constant prayer! Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 4, 1865. I hear from Washington the vote on my confirmation was thirtytwo to five. I have not heard the names of my opponents, but their number is about what I expected, and I have no doubt they are all like Chandler, men whose opposition is rather creditable to you. As to the Peace Commissioners, I presume their arrival will make a great stir; I have written you what passed between us when I called on them. I understand they afterwards went down to Fortress Monroe, where they met, some
December 23rd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 6
find some friend in the Senate who will call for the proceedings of the court, and have them published. Mr. Cowan, from Pennsylvania, is the proper person, but I do not know him, and, moreover, do not want to run against Mr. Stanton, so perhaps will wait till I see the Secretary and can talk with him before I take any action. I presume their object is to get some capital to operate with, to oppose the confirmation of my nomination in the Senate. Headquarters army of the Potomac, December 23, 1864. I have received a letter from the Earl of Fife, in Scotland, asking my good offices for a young kinsman of his, who, he understands, has got a commission in my army. I think I told you some time ago I had a letter from a Mr. Duff, just arrived in New York, asking to be taken on my staff, and sending a letter of introduction from Captain Schenley. I replied he would first have to get a commission, and indicated to him how to go about it. Since then I have not heard from him, but p
February 2nd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
king with them, or what I said. I do most earnestly pray something may result from this movement. When they came within our lines our men cheered loudly, and the soldiers on both sides cried out lustily, Peace! peace! This was intended as a compliment, and I believe was so taken by them. I am sorry I could not stay longer with you, but I don't believe I should have had any satisfaction, as every report brought in would have a recall telegram. Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 2, 1865. Grant sent me a note this morning, saying a telegram from Washington announced my confirmation yesterday by a heavy majority; thus I have gained another victory, and have found that I really have more friends than I had any idea of. There have been some English officers here this evening from the frigate Galatea, and they have kept me up so late that I cannot write as much as I would wish. I thought my last visit was, excepting dear Sergeant's Son of General Meade. sickness
February 1st, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
nds to relieve their spiritual wants; but I believe the Confederate authorities declined. The Richmond papers are very severe on Davis, and there is every indication of discord among them. I hope to Heaven this will incline them to peace, and that there may be some truth in the many reports in the papers that something is going on! General Meade left Headquarters for Philadelphia where he arrived January 28. He left Philadelphia on the 30th. Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 1, 1865. I reached City Point at twelve o'clock last night, having had a very comfortable journey via Annapolis. We found a good deal of ice in the Chesapeake Bay and considerable in the James River; but to-day has been so mild and pleasant I think the ice will disappear. From all I can gather, the Secretary's telegram must have been based on something Ord sent to Washington; for Grant did not return till Monday night, and in ignorance of Mr. Stanton's telegram, sent me one himself, yes
January 17th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
the Senate that the Committee on the Conduct of the War enquire and report on the Wilmington fiasco. This is the beginning of a war on Grant. Gibbon has been assigned to the Twenty-fourth Corps, in Ord's place, who takes Butler's army. This has pleased him very much, and when here to-day to say good-by he was in quite a good humor. I shall probably have to send Webb to Gibbon's division, although I believe he would prefer remaining on my staff. Headquarters army of the Potomac, January 17, 1865. To-day we have the news that the second expedition has succeeded in taking Fort Fisher, which is a most important and brilliant success. It will, however, have a most damaging effect on Butler's case, and will also materially injure Weitzel's reputation. I must confess I thought Butler's report cleared him in every particular except two. First, he should not have wasted three days, waiting for the enemy, when he knew the fort was weakly garrisoned. Secondly, he should not have le
January 14th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
o take Fort Fisher, Wilmington, N. C., and withdrew Dec. 25, 1864. He was relieved by the President, on Grant's request. The particular cause had not been made public. It is hardly necessary I should tell you how much I have suffered since I left you. All I can do is earnestly to pray God to have mercy on dear Sergeant and yourself, and to give you strength to bear up under the affliction you are visited with. My heart is too full to write more. Headquarters army of the Potomac, January 14, 1865. I am sorry to hear what you write people say of Grant, because it is unjust, and I do not approve of injustice to any one. Grant undoubtedly has lost prestige, owing to his failure to accomplish more, but as I know it has not been in his power to do more, I cannot approve of unmerited censure, any more than I approved of the fulsome praise showered on him before the campaign commenced. Butler's removal has caused great excitement everywhere. He will have some very powerful influe
January 21st, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
use an assault was impracticable; and his statement that a siege was not within his instructions, is contradicted by Grant's written instructions, which say that, if a landing is effected, and the work not carried, he is to entrench and hold on. There will, no doubt, be bitter controversy on these points. Grant has been away for three days, to parts unknown, though I suppose Wilmington. To Mr. Henry A. Cram, Brother-in-law of Mrs. Meade. New York: Headquarters army of the Potomac, January 21, 1865. I have received yours of the 18th, with enclosures. The intelligence conveyed in Mr.——'s letter is not news to me, except that I have not been able to believe I was in danger of rejection. I, of course, expected opposition, and that it would be violent and malignant, being based on falsehood and personal hostility; but I did not suppose it would be formidable in numbers, and I have been relying on the truth, my record, and the fact that I was sustained by the Administration and G
January 22nd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
x R. One difficulty I have to contend with is that those who are disposed to hit the President, Secretary or Grant, think they are doing so in hitting me. The nomination is, after all, only a compliment, and of no real practical value, as it will not deprive me of my superior rank in the volunteer service or my present command, the largest in the field. It is, nevertheless, mortifying to have a compliment thus detracted from. To Mrs. George G. Meade: Headquarters army of the Potomac, January 22, 1865. There is very little going on here. We have had a violent storm of rain. Grant is still away, and I have heard nothing from Markoe Bache, so that I am ignorant of what turn affairs are taking in Washington. I received a letter yesterday from Cram, enclosing me one from a correspondent in Washington, who advises him (Cram) that he has been reliably informed that I am likely to be rejected. Still, this may be a street rumor, circulated by those who want this result. To-day Bis
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