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February 28th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
hardly dare think of you in your lonely condition, surrounded by so many associations of our beloved boy. God have mercy on you and send you submission and resignation! No human reasoning can afford you or myself any consolation. Submission to God's will, and the satisfaction arising from the consciousness that we did our duty by him, is all that is left us. I shall leave here at 3 P. M., and will write to you on my arrival at my headquarters. Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 28, 1865. After writing to you yesterday I saw the Secretary, who was as usual very kind. He apologized for ordering me away when he did, and said he had forgotten dear Sergeant's sickness, and some telegrams coming from Ord he did not like, he thought, in Grant's absence, I had better be there. He wanted me to stay in Washington over night, but I declined, when he directed a special steamer to be got ready to take me at seven in the evening. From the Department I went to the Capitol, wher
February 27th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
all must die in time. George will tell you all about me. General Meade left headquarters at 12 o'clock noon, on February 21, for Philadelphia, and arrived there at 10 P. M., on the 23d. Before General Meade had reached his home the newspapers announced the death of his son Sergeant on the 21st instant at 11 P. M. General Meade left Philadelphia at 11 P. M. on the 26th for the army, having been hurriedly sent for by the Secretary of War. War Department, Washington City, 12 M., February 27, 1865. I take advantage of a delay, waiting to see the Secretary, to send you a few lines. I slept nearly all the journey, much to my surprise; but I was grateful it was so, as I feel in consequence much better than if I had lain awake all night. Hardy Norris was very kind to me this morning, and accompanied me to the hotel, where we breakfasted, after which I came up here. General Hancock left suddenly yesterday for Western Virginia. This has given rise to rumor of movements of L
March 2nd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
nd myself. We reached City Point at 1 P. M. to-day. I spent two hours with General Grant, reaching my headquarters about half-past 4 this afternoon. I find we have not been attacked, and Petersburg has not been evacuated, although I should judge there had been a stampede ever since I left, and that both contingencies had been expected. It has been raining, I am told, nearly all the time I have been absent, and the roads are in an awful condition. Headquarters army of the Potomac, March 2, 1865. Lyman Theodore Lyman, aide-de-camp to General Meade. has returned without waiting for my summons, he becoming nervous for fear some movement of Lee's might precipitate matters before he could get notice, and if the army should move, it might be a difficult matter to join it. I see by the papers Howard and Schofield have been made brigadier generals in the regular army. This I think injustice to General Warren, whom I recommended some time ago to General Grant for this position
February 13th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
lie's William Sergeant, brother of Mrs. Meade. regiment was in the thickest of the fight and suffered severely, but I believe behaved very well. There is now here an artist in bronze, of the name of Simmons, who is sculpturing a life-size head of me, of which he intends casting a medallion in bronze. His work is pronounced excellent, and he promises to present you a copy, so you will have your Meade art gallery increased. Grant is still away. Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 13, 1865. There is no chance for peace now. The South has determined to fight another campaign, and it is to be hoped the North will be equally united, and turn out men to fill up all our present armies and form others at the same time. Grant returned from Washington to-day. He forgot to say anything about the court of inquiry, so I have to-day telegraphed Mr. Stanton, asking him to have the proceedings published. Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 21, 1865. I told George
February 9th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
eat as in many previous engagements, and I hear of but few officers killed or severely wounded. I have been in the saddle each day from early in the morning till near midnight, and was too much exhausted to write. Colonel Lyman sent me a box, which he said contained books and pickles. I find, on opening it, that there are about a dozen nice books and a box of champagne; so you can tell dear Sergeant he is not the only one that gets good things. Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 9, 1865. I note you have seen the report of the Committee on the Conduct of the War, about the Mine. You have done Grant injustice; he did not testify against me; but the committee has distorted his testimony, my own, and that of every one who told the truth, in order to sustain their censure. When you see all the testimony you will find their verdict is not sustained. Immediately on the appearance of this report Grant sent me a despatch, a copy of which I enclose, and from it you will se
February 11th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
th any such ideas. This conference ought to unite the North to a vigorous prosecution of the war; and the people, if they do not volunteer, should submit cheerfully to the draft. In the same paper, which I send you, is an obituary notice of Beckham, who, it appears, was killed in one of Thomas's fights at Columbia, in Tennessee, he being colonel and chief of artillery to S. D. Lee's Corps. Poor fellow, he and Kirby Smith have both been sacrificed! Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 11, 1865. I see the Tribune, with its usual malice, charges the recent movement as a failure, and puts the blame on me. I told Grant, before the movement was made, it would be misunderstood and called a failure. But he promised to telegraph to Washington what we intended to do, thinking by this to avoid this misapprehension. His telegram, if he sent one, was never published, nor has any of his or my telegrams to him about the affair been made public. Now, the facts of the case are that I
February 21st, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
army of the Potomac, February 13, 1865. There is no chance for peace now. The South has determined to fight another campaign, and it is to be hoped the North will be equally united, and turn out men to fill up all our present armies and form others at the same time. Grant returned from Washington to-day. He forgot to say anything about the court of inquiry, so I have to-day telegraphed Mr. Stanton, asking him to have the proceedings published. Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 21, 1865. I told George Son of General Meade. last evening to write to you and acknowledge the receipt of your letters of the 17th and 18th, also your telegram of the 20th. The latter I did not understand until this evening, when George received a letter from Jim Biddle, of the 19th, from which I infer Sergeant was considered sinking on Sunday, and finding him better on Monday, you telegraphed. George will leave to-morrow, and will take this. It is impossible for me to go to you, unles
September 7th (search for this): chapter 6
d to keep his family in Philadelphia for the next few years, probably for the education of his children. I think we shall be quiet for some time, unless the enemy attacks, which I hardly think probable. Butler is away now, but when he returns I shall make an effort to get off for a few days, to have a peep at you and the children; but don't rely too much on my coming. General Meade left camp on September 1, and arrived at his home in Philadelphia on the 3d. He left Philadelphia on September 7, and arrived at Washington on the 8th. War Department, September 8, 1864. I have been received with the greatest kindness both by the President and Mr. Stanton. At my request, Willie's Brother of Mrs. Meade. appointment was immediately made out and given to him, and Mr. Stanton said I might rest assured my major-generalcy would in due time be given me. I am very much hurried and leave this afternoon at six. Headquarters army of the Potomac, September 10, 1864. I reached h
spirit as appears to have dictated them. Warrenton, Va., July 26, 1863. I think my last letter to you was about the 21st or 22d, when I was embarrassed at not ascertaining anything definite in regard to Lee's movements. The next day, the 22d, I had positive information he was moving up the Valley of the Shenandoah. I immediately put my army in motion and pushed through Manassas Gap, where I met a part of his force. By the evening of the 24th I drove his force through Manassas Gap, athe courage to go. I don't mind the going, but it is the coming back which is so unpleasant. Headquarters army of the Potomac, February 24, 1864. Since writing last we have had quite a gay time. The ball of the Second Corps came off on the 22d, and was quite a success. The room constructed for the purpose was beautifully decorated. There were present about three hundred ladies, many coming from Washington for the occasion, an elegant supper furnished by Gautier, indeed everything in f
r boy has had warning, and not only his good life, but the consciousness that he knew and was prepared for the change, should sustain us in that parting which had to be encountered one day, for we all must die in time. George will tell you all about me. General Meade left headquarters at 12 o'clock noon, on February 21, for Philadelphia, and arrived there at 10 P. M., on the 23d. Before General Meade had reached his home the newspapers announced the death of his son Sergeant on the 21st instant at 11 P. M. General Meade left Philadelphia at 11 P. M. on the 26th for the army, having been hurriedly sent for by the Secretary of War. War Department, Washington City, 12 M., February 27, 1865. I take advantage of a delay, waiting to see the Secretary, to send you a few lines. I slept nearly all the journey, much to my surprise; but I was grateful it was so, as I feel in consequence much better than if I had lain awake all night. Hardy Norris was very kind to me this morning,
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