hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George G. Meade 1,542 0 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 641 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 498 4 Browse Search
Zachary Taylor 476 2 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 357 1 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 325 1 Browse Search
John F. Reynolds 309 3 Browse Search
Ambrose E. Burnside 306 2 Browse Search
George Gordon Meade 303 39 Browse Search
Daniel E. Sickles 296 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). Search the whole document.

Found 2,608 total hits in 665 results.

... 62 63 64 65 66 67
s the children are all sweet, and that Mr. and Mrs. Huger are devoted to them, but that Mr. Huger has lost everything, and is now very poor, that he is old and infirm, and will not probably live long. She says Mr. Huger's house in Charleston was burned in the great fire of 1862, and everything in it destroyed, all the old pictures, and all the clothes, jewels and everything belonging to Mariamne's children. Mr. Huger at this time was Postmaster of Charleston, and used to come up and spend Sundays at Columbia. Mrs. Wise had not heard from them since Sherman's occupation. I have already written you that I expect to be in Washington by the 18th inst. It is generally believed that after the army is assembled in Washington it will be disbanded. In that case I shall undoubtedly be allowed some relaxation before again being assigned to duty, and will then have an opportunity of being home for awhile. Richmond, Va., May 5, 1865. It was intended we should march through the city to-
civil War letters, 1863-1865 To Mrs. George G. Meade: Headquarters army of the Potomac, Frederick, July 8, 1863. I arrived here yesterday; the army is assembling at Middletown. I think we shall have another battle before Lee can cross the river, though from all accounts he is making great efforts to do so. For my part, as I have to follow and fight him, I would rather do it at once and in Maryland than to follow into Virginia. I received last evening your letters of the 3d and 5th inst., and am truly rejoiced that you are treated with such distinction on account of my humble services. I see also that the papers are making a great deal too much fuss about me. I claim no extraordinary merit for this last battle, and would prefer waiting a little while to see what my career is to be before making any pretensions. I did and shall continue to do my duty to the best of my abilities, but knowing as I do that battles are often decided by accidents, and that no man of sense will
ng to collect some trophies from our recent battle-fields to send you for your fair. Headquarters army of the Potomac, 9 P. M., June 9, 1864. I fully enter into all your feelings of annoyance at the manner in which I have been treated, but I do not see that I can do anything but bear patiently till it pleases God to let the truth be known and matters set right. I have noticed what you say about the Inquirer, but, as you observe, it is no worse than the other papers. Even Coppee, in the June number of his magazine, shows he, too, is demoralized, he having a flaming editorial notice of the wonderful genius of Grant. Now, to tell the truth, the latter has greatly disappointed me, and since this campaign I really begin to think I am something of a general. I don't know whether you saw an article in the Inquirer of the 2d inst. on me, which the writer intended to be very complimentary. For article mentioned, see Appendix P. At the close of it he refers to an eventful occasion
at once and in Maryland than to follow into Virginia. I received last evening your letters of the 3d and 5th inst., and am truly rejoiced that you are treated with such distinction on account of my hhim, and coming so near George as to carry away a part of the back of his saddle. This was on the 3d, just after we had repulsed the last assault, when I rode up to the front, and George was the onlyers. Headquarters army of the Potomac, 9 P. M., June 5, 1864. Since our last battle on the 3d inst. we have been comparatively quiet. The enemy has tried his hand once or twice at the offensive, coming. General Meade left camp on September 1, and arrived at his home in Philadelphia on the 3d. He left Philadelphia on September 7, and arrived at Washington on the 8th. War Department, Sep I was never alarmed about my small arm ammunition, and after Hancock's repulsing the enemy on the 3d, I rode to the left, gave orders for an immediate advance, and used every exertion to have an atta
y disappointed me, and since this campaign I really begin to think I am something of a general. I don't know whether you saw an article in the Inquirer of the 2d inst. on me, which the writer intended to be very complimentary. For article mentioned, see Appendix P. At the close of it he refers to an eventful occasion when Grous falsehood which I found had been extensively circulated all through the North, and the first intimation of which was a reference to it in the Inquirer of the 2d inst. Since writing, I have received the enclosed message from the Secretary of War, to which I sent the accompanying note. I do not remember whether I ever told you Lee appears so determined to be prudent and cautious. He confines himself strictly to the defensive, and lets slip the chances for a coup we offer him. On the second day, whilst I was on horseback on the field, talking to Generals Griffin and Bartlett, surrounded by my staff and escort, a shell fell in our midst, grazing Humph
... 62 63 64 65 66 67