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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 104 (search)
d Division, a support to the Twenty-third Corps. On the night of the 26th of August, at 8 o'clock, we withdrew from the works, and moved with the rest of the army to the right, commencing that series of movements which ended with the battle of Jonesborough, on the 1st day of September. We marched some three miles to the right on the 26th, went into camp, and remained there during next day, and on the evening of the 28th reached the West Point railroad, which we assisted in destroying on the 29th. On the 30th moved again to the right, camping on the farm of Mrs. Evans, about two miles from Renfroe's. The 31st marched to Renfroe's in the morning, went into line of battle, and about the middle of the afternoon moved in the direction of the Macon railroad for about a mile and a half, when we were halted and ordered back to our camp of the previous night. At an early hour on the 1st of September we moved in the direction of Jonesborough. On this day the memorable engagement of Jonesbor
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 108 (search)
ant. On this day, in compliance with a field order of the day, the battalion was detailed to worry the enemy and attract his attention to the front of our division. In executing this order the battalion attacked the enemy's skirmish line and drove his skirmishers into their works, holding the ground thus gained until night-fall, when, our object having been accomplished, we withdrew and returned to our works. In the skirmish we lost i officer, Lieutenant Jackson, and 3 men wounded. On the 29th the battalion went on picket at 6 p. m. and remained until 5 p. m. of the 30th, losing 4 men wounded, when we returned to ground occupied on 29th; went into bivouac and remained until August 2. Distance marched during July, thirty miles. On the 2d of August advanced 300 yards and built works, and on the 3d left these works, having been relieved by troops of the Twentieth Army Corps, and marched to the extreme right flank of the army and built works. On the 4th went with the brigade on a rec
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 114 (search)
es to Etowah River. Next day relieved from said duty, and, marching five miles, joined division; afterward crossed creek at Hawkins', and camped on ridge. Moved from last-mentioned camp on 26th of May at 2 a. m. to Burnt Hickory, and thence several miles toward Dallas. On 27th marched in line of battle to the front several miles, .until 4 p. m., when the battalion moved by the left flank to Pumpkin Vine Creek, where we found the enemy in force; built intrenchments during the night. On the 29th the battalion was separated on the following duties: Captain Barnard, with three companies, A, B, and E, on picket; Lieutenant Leamy, with Companies C, F, G, H, and A, Second Battalion, skirmishing in front of position occupied by Second Battalion, Eighteenth Regiment U. S. Infantry; Captain Phelps, with a portion of Company D, filling a gap between two battalions on the front line of the brigade. On the 30th of May the remaining seventy men of the battalion were directed to cross the creek
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 122 (search)
was confronting us. I was ordered by Colonel Moore, commanding brigade, to deploy my regiment as skirmishers on the right of the line of the First Brigade, and advance the line, which I did, but soon ran against the enemy in force, and a portion of my line suffered considerably, as will be shown by accompanying list. My regiment was relieved on the 23d, when we built a line of works, occupied them for some days, when we were relieved by a regiment of the First Brigade. On July 28 marched with the brigade to the extreme right as support to the Fifteenth Corps; built a line of works that night; was relieved on the morning of the 29th, and marched back to the position we left in front of Atlanta. Staid in front of the city, building works and advancing the lines until August 15, when I was relieved by Col. Josiah Given taking command. Respectfully, Joseph Fisher, Major Seventy-fourth Ohio Veteran Infantry. Captain Hicks, A. A. A. G., Third Brig., First Div., 14th Army Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 124 (search)
t, when the regiment was ordered to support the skirmish line, it being the intention to develop the position of the enemy. The skirmishers charged, supported gallantly by the regiment, who rushed forward, capturing some prisoners, and driving the enemy into the main line of works, under a heavy fire of artillery and infantry. 28th, moved with the brigade to re-enforce the extreme right of the Army of the Tennessee, a distance of five miles, and fortified, remaining until the morning of the 29th, when ordered to take up the old ground. August 4, again ordered to the right to rejoin the division. Moved into position and ordered to countermarch, taking up the original position until the 24th, when they again shifted to the right. Afternoon of the 25th ordered to move at 8 p. m. without any unnecessary noise, as the whole line was to be abandoned. Moved at the appointed hour four miles to the right and rear. 26th, moved at 3 p. m. to the right some five miles. 27th, moved half mile
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
force, and, in compliance with instructions from Major-General Sherman, I sent a staff officer to order Morgan to Howard's support. Morgan, who, when the messenger reached him, was several miles off, turned his column at once in the direction of the fighting. Every effort was made by General Morgan to reach the position, but he was unable to do so until the enemy had been repulsed. The troops went into bivouac long after night, much fatigued from the long march and excessive heat. On the 29th the division took position on the right of the Army of the Tennessee, and intrenched itself, where it remained with little change until the 4th, when, in accordance with orders, it moved across Utoy Creek and took position on the right and rear of Baird's division. This was accomplished after some heavy skirmishing, in which the enemy's artillery took part. On the 5th the division took ground to the right and front, the left brigade connecting with Baird's right flank, where it remained muc
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 141 (search)
ny, accidentally shot himself dead. The regiment remained skirmishing constantly and heavily with the enemy until midnight of the 28th, when it was relieved; lost in killed on the 28th, James N. Finney, Company C. The regiment was in camp on the 29th, 30th, and 31st. On the last-mentioned day we were heavily shelled by the enemy, and Nathan R. Householder, Company D, was killed by a fragment of a shell, which struck him on the head. From the 1st of June to the 27th the regiment did no othd before morning of the following day, had strong works erected within seventy-five yards of the enemy. We remained in the trenches until the night of the 30th, when we were relieved by the Thirty-fourth Illinois Regiment. On the night of the 29th, at 1 a. m., the enemy assaulted our line of works, but were soon and handsomely driven off with a loss to us of 1 man killed, Thomas B. Lisbey, Company D. The regiment, after being relieved, returned to camp, and there remained until the evening
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 143 (search)
g of the 22d we moved out and took up a position on the right and south of the railroad within three miles of Atlanta in front of the enemy's works, our right resting near the old mill, built intrenchments, and rested here behind our works until the morning of the 28th, doing only the customary picket duty. July 28, the division, under command of General Morgan, made a reconnaissance to the right toward Sandtown; returned and took up a position at 12 o'clock at night near White Hall. On the 29th advanced our line across the battle-field of the 28th, making reconnaissance to the front. Found the enemy's dead unburied and many of their wounded uncared for. On the 30th advanced our line again to the front and right, the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio acting as skirmishers. On the 31st made a part of division reconnaissance to the right and front, and returned to camp at dark. Rested in camp on the 1st, 2d, and 3d of August. On the 4th moved early in light marching order, Secon
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 155 (search)
s far as the Widow Holbrook's place and camped for the night in a position to protect the trains then parked near Patterson's. On the 28th marched by a cross-road to Mount Gilead Church; remained with the teams until 10 a. in.; were then ordered by General Thomas to report to our division commander; marched with the division until near night, when we crossed the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad; took up a position about three-fourths of a mile from Red Oak Station. Remained in position on the 29th. On the 30th marched at 6 a. m. by Shoal Creek Church; met the enemy's cavalry in small force and skirmished with it about one mile, to house, killing 1 and capturing 2 of the enemy ; took up a strong position; sent forward the Ninety-second Ohio for picket duty; received reports of the enemy moving in the direction of Jonesborough during the night, and sent the reports to General Baird. About daylight on the morning of the 31st I went out to the picket-line, then half a mile in advance of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 161 (search)
cked for the night, where we remained till the train arrived from Kingston, going front at 7 o'clock on the 27th; we returned with it, recrossing the Etowah and Euharlee Creek at the same points; after marching twelve miles we halted and bivouacked for the night near Pumpkin Vine Creek. On the morning of the 28th we moved for Burnt Hickory, which we reached at noon. After resting an hour, we moved toward Dallas and camped for the night in a little valley two miles from Burnt Hickory. On the 29th we received orders to march with our division. We moved eastward several miles, halting on a high hill. After resting a short time we moved back, taking position northwest of our train, throwing out pickets, and went into camp, where we remained till June 1, when Colonel Carlton, of the Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry, relieved me of its (Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry) command. J. H. Jolly, CMajor Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry. Capt. W d. B Curtis, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Arm
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