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Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 1 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 1 1 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
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o the inner harbor and up to the city, which he deemed no longer defensible against our naval force; but Dahlgren did not concur in this opinion of the feasibility of such an enterprise, and it was not attempted. Gillmore, having completed Aug. 21 his arrangements for opening fire from the Swamp Angel, summoned Beauregard to abandon Morris island and Sumter, on penalty of the bombardment of Charleston. Receiving no reply, he fired a few shots from that battery, and desisted. Beauregard rary to the laws of war. The high tides raised by the storm aforesaid partially filled our works, washing down parapets and impeding our operations as well as destroying our approaches; yet a fourth parallel was soon established, Night of Aug. 21. barely 300 yards from Wagner, and only 100 from a sheltering ridge in its front, from behind which Rebel sharp-shooters had seriously impeded our working parties and defied efforts to expel them by infantry, as they afterward did Aug. 26. to
regiment, filled soon afterward, had its two highest officers White; all the rest colored. His third was officered by the best men that could be had, regardless of color. His two batteries were officered by Whites only; for the simple reason that there were no others who had any knowledge of artillery. On the reception at Richmond of tidings of Gen. Hunter's and Gen. Phelps's proceedings with reference to the enlistment of negro soldiers for the Union armies, Jefferson Davis issued Aug. 21. an order directing that said Generals be no longer regarded as public enemies of the Confederacy, but as outlaws; and that, in the event of the capture of either of them, or of any other commissioned officer employed in organizing, drilling, or instructing slaves, he should not be treated as a prisoner of war, but held in close confinement for execution as a felon, at such time and place as he (J. D.) should order. It is not recorded that any one was ever actually hung under this order.
over the lost ground and reestablish his lines. Warren was well aware that his position astride the Weldon road was not adapted to tranquillity, and governed himself accordingly. Hardly three days had elapsed, when he was suddenly saluted Aug. 21. by 30 Rebel guns; and, after an hour's lively practice, an assaulting column advanced on his front, while another attempted to reach and turn his left flank. But Warren was prepared for this manoeuver, and easily baffled it, flanking the flankof them prisoners — while the enemy had lost scarcely half that number; but he had lost and we had gained the Weldon road. Hancock, returned from the north of the James, had moved rapidly to the Weldon road in the rear of Warren. Striking Aug. 21. it at Reams's station, he had been busily tearing it up for two or three days; when his cavalry gave warning that the enemy in force were at hand. Their first blow fell on Miles's division, on our right, and was promptly repulsed; but Hill ord
main body had been drawn off for service elsewhere. Smith remained in this region several days, and then returned to Memphis; whence he was soon called to the aid of Rosecrans in Missouri, as has already been stated. But while Smith was vainly hunting for Forrest in Mississippi, that chieftain reported himself in person at Memphis. Taking, 3,000 of his best-mounted men, Forrest flanked Aug. 18. our army by night, and made a forced march to Memphis, which he charged into at dawn; Aug. 21. making directly for the Gayoso house and other hotels, where his spies had assured him that Gens. Hurlbut, Washburne, and Buckland, were quartered. He failed to clutch either of them, but captured several staff and other officers, with soldiers enough to make a total of 300. Yet he failed to carry Irving prison, where the Rebel captives were in durance, made no attempt on the fort, and was driven out or ran out of the city after a stay of two hours, in which he had done considerable dama
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
ent affairs in Mississippi, and ascertain the causes of our disasters. Although the purpose of this investigation was to decide whether Lieutenant-General Pemberton or myself was responsible for those disasters, the arrangement made by the Administration did not make me a party to it. In a telegram of that date to General Cooper, I claimed the right to be present for my defense, and on the 21st the War Department conceded that right. On the 22d the following dispatch, dated Ringgold, August 21st, was received from General Bragg: Enemy in force opposite us, and reported in large force moving on Knoxville. Will need help if he advances with his troops from Tennessee and Kentucky. I immediately asked the War Department, by telegraph, if I was authorized to reenforce General Bragg with a part of the troops of the Department of Mississippi, if he should require aid, and informed General Bragg of the inquiry; telling him also that, in the event of an affirmative answer, two division
Doc. 205.-Confederate thanks to Gen. M'Culloch and his command. The following resolution was introduced into the rebel Congress on the 21st of August by Mr. Ochiltree, of Texas, and was passed unanimously: whereas, It has pleased Almighty God to vouchsafe to the arms of the Confederate States another glorious and important victory in a portion of the country where a reverse would have been disastrous, by exposing the families of the good people of the State of Missouri to the unbridled license of the brutal soldiery of an unscrupulous enemy; therefore, be it Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States, That the thanks of Congress are cordially tendered to Brig.-Gen. Ben. McCulloch, and the officers and soldiers of his brave command, for their gallant conduct in defeating, after a battle of six and a half hours, a force of the enemy equal in numbers, and greatly superior in all their appointments, thus proving that a right cause nerves the hearts and strengthens the a
movement in advance. I think they are not yet ready, for want of transportation for supplies, to cross the Rapidan. John Pope, Major-General. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. Despatches and orders sent and received from Aug. 21 to Aug. 24 Inclusive. United States military telegraph. Received Aug. 21, 1862, from War Department, Washington. To Gen. Pope: I have telegraphed Gen. Burnside to know at what hour he can reinforce Reno. Am waiting his answer. Every efpeper, and encamping at midnight about four miles north of that place on the Sulphur Springs road. On the twentieth, at daylight, resumed march toward Sulphur Springs; reached there at five P. M., without any signs of the enemy in our rear. August 21.--Started this morning at eight, taking the advance of the corps, in the direction of the Rappahannock station, to reenforce Banks and McDowell, who had thus far prevented the enemy from crossing the river at that point, and found a heavy artil
movement in advance. I think they are not yet ready, for want of transportation for supplies, to cross the Rapidan. John Pope, Major-General. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. Despatches and orders sent and received from Aug. 21 to Aug. 24 Inclusive. United States military telegraph. Received Aug. 21, 1862, from War Department, Washington. To Gen. Pope: I have telegraphed Gen. Burnside to know at what hour he can reinforce Reno. Am waiting his answer. Every efpeper, and encamping at midnight about four miles north of that place on the Sulphur Springs road. On the twentieth, at daylight, resumed march toward Sulphur Springs; reached there at five P. M., without any signs of the enemy in our rear. August 21.--Started this morning at eight, taking the advance of the corps, in the direction of the Rappahannock station, to reenforce Banks and McDowell, who had thus far prevented the enemy from crossing the river at that point, and found a heavy artil
report. Louisville, Ky., September 8, 1862. Messrs. Editors: Not having an opportunity of reporting to General Johnson, in writing, the part the regiment I had the honor to command took in the battle at Gallatin, Tenn., between the forces of Col. Morgan and Gen. Johnson, before his official report, I desire, through your columns, to make a plain statement of the fight and the conduct of each regiment, so far as necessary to explain that of my regiment. On the morning of the twenty-first of August, we ascertained that Colonel Morgan, with his brigade, was stationed in or near Gallatin, numbering between one thousand one hundred and one thousand five hundred men, and having, as I understood, been ordered by General Nelson to attack wherever we found him, regardless of numbers, and believing the advantage vantage we would have in making the charge would equal the number that Morgan's forces exceeded ours, we charged upon the enemy with all the force we had, not leaving any behin
h-Carolina,Evans's,Longstreet's,72027Rappahannock, August 23. Washington artillery, Longstreet's,81422Rappahannock, August 23. 5th Texas,Hood's,Longstreet's, 1010Freeman's Ford, August 23. Ashby artillery,Robertson'sStuart's,1 1Rappahannock, August 21. 6th Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStuart's, 55Brandy Station, August 20. 7th Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStuart's,369Brandy Station, August 20. 12th Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStuart's, 11Brandy Station, August 20. 2d Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStuart's, 11Waterloo Bridge, August 25. 2d Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStuart's, 22Bristoe Station, August 28. 12th Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStuart's, 44Sudley Mills, August 28. 17th Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStuart's,1 1Bull Run, August 21. 2d Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStuart's,33134Manassas, August 30. Leesburgh, Va., September 2. 2d Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStuart's,4711Poolesville, Md., September 8. Jefferson, Md., September 13. 12th Virginia cavalry,Robertson'sStu
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