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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1759 AD or search for 1759 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stanwix, John 1690- (search)
Stanwix, John 1690- Military officer; born in England, about 1690; came to America, in 1756, as commandant of the first battalion of the 60th, or Royal Americans. He was commander of the Southern District, with his headquarters at Carlisle, Pa., in 1757. In December he was promoted to brigadier-general. On being relieved by Forbes, he proceeded to Albany, and was directed to build a fort at the Oneida carrying-place, on the Mohawk. He returned to Pennsylvania, a majorgeneral, in 1759, strengthened Fort Pitt, and secured the good — will of the Indians. In May, 1760, he resigned his commission to Monckton, and, on his return to England, was appointed lieutenant-governor of the Isle of Wight, and afterwards promoted to lieutenant-general. He also became a member of Parliament. He had served with reputation in the wars of Queen Anne before coming to America, having entered the army in 1706. General Stanwix was lost at sea while crossing from Dublin to Holyhead in December, 1765
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stephen, James 1759-1832 (search)
Stephen, James 1759-1832 Author; born in Poole, England, in 1759; received a fair education and became a barrister; was a member of Parliament, and later was made under secretary for the colonies. He was the author of American arguments on neutral rights; Speech in the House of Commons on the overtures of the American government, etc. He died in Bath, England, Oct. 10, 1832. Stephens, Alexander Hamilton Stephen, James 1759-1832 Author; born in Poole, England, in 1759; received a fair education and became a barrister; was a member of Parliament, and later was made under secretary for the colonies. He was the author of American arguments on neutral rights; Speech in the House of Commons on the overtures of the American government, etc. He died in Bath, England, Oct. 10, 1832. Stephens, Alexander Hamilton
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thomas, John 1725-1776 (search)
Thomas, John 1725-1776 Military officer; born in Marshfield, Mass., in 1725; was a practising physician, and was surgeon in the provincial army sent to Nova Scotia in 1746. In 1747 he was on Shirley's medical staff, and in 1759 he became colonel of a provincial regiment. He commanded a regiment under Amherst and Haviland in 1760 in the capture of Montreal Colonel Thomas was one of the most active Sons of Liberty in Massachusetts; was appointed brigadier-general by Congress ill 1775; commanded a brigade during the siege of Boston, and after the evacuation was sent to take command of the American troops in Canada. He joined the army before Quebec May 1, 1776, and died in Chambly, June 2, 1776.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ticonderoga, operations at (search)
o fall back to Lake George, leaving about 2,000 men dead or wounded in the forest. Abercrombie then hastened to his camp at the head of the lake. The loss of the French was inconsiderable. Pitt conceived a magnificent plan for the campaign of 1759, the principal feature of which was the conquest of all Canada, and so ending the puissance of France in America. Abercrombie, who had been unsuccessful, was superseded by Gen. Sir Jeffrey Amherst in the command of the British forces in America in the spring of 1759. The new commander found 20,000 provincial troops at his disposal. A competent land and naval force was sent from England to co-operate with the Americans. The plan of operations against Canada was similar to that of Phipps and Winthrop in 1690. A powerful land and naval force, under Gen. James Wolfe, were to ascend the St. Lawrence and attack Quebec. Another force, under Amherst, was to drive the French from Lake Champlain, seize Montreal, and join Wolfe at Quebec; and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trumbull, Benjamin 1735-1820 (search)
Trumbull, Benjamin 1735-1820 Historian; born in Hebron, Conn., Dec. 19, 1735; graduated at Yale College in 1759, and studied theology under Rev. Eleazer Wheelock; pastor in North Haven for nearly sixty years. His publications include General history of the United States of America; Complete history of Connecticut from 1630 till 1713 (2 volumes). He died in North Haven, Conn., Feb. 2, 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trumbull, Jonathan 1710-1785 (search)
army was afterwards spread over the country and difficulties arose, it was a common saying among the officers, as a by-word, We must consult brother Jonathan. The origin of these words were soon lost sight Governor Trumbull's War-office. of, and Brother Jonathan became the title of our nationality, like that of John Bull of England. He died in Lebanon, Conn., Aug. 17, 1785. Legislator; born in Lebanon, Conn., March 26, 1740; son of Governor Trumbull; graduated at Harvard College in 1759. When the Revolutionary War broke out, he was an active member of the Connecticut Assembly, and its speaker. From 1775 to 1778 he was paymaster of the Northern army; and in 1780 he was secretary and first aide to Washington, remaining in the military family of the commander-in-chief until the close of the war. He was a member of Congress from 1789 to 1795; speaker from 1791 to 1795; United States Senator in 1795-96; lieutenant-governor of Connecticut in 1796; and governor from 1797 until hi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pennsylvania, (search)
2,700 under Col. John Armstrong, among them Benjamin West, afterwards the painter, and Anthony Wayne, a lad of thirteen years; Virginia 1,900, with Washington as leader The Virginia troops rendezvous at Fort Cumberland, Md., and the Pennsylvania and other troops at Raystown, now Bedford, Pa. Washington advised the Braddock route for the advance, while Cols Bouquet and Armstrong recommended a more central one, which was adopted.] Extensive emigration to the western part of Pennsylvania......1759-62 Beginning of the Pontiac War......1763 Treaty of peace between England and France, termed the treaty of Paris......Feb. 10, 1763 Attack made by the Indians along the frontier of Pennsylvania and Virginia......May, 1763 Fort Le Boeuf burned by Indians; garrison escapes......June 18, 1763 Fort Venango destroyed, garrison and all......June 18, 1763 Presque Isle, now Erie, garrison of twenty-four men, surrenders......June 22, 1763 Fort Pitt, with a garrison of 330 men, an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Van Schaick, Gozen 1737-1787 (search)
Van Schaick, Gozen 1737-1787 Military officer; born in Albany,. N. Y., in January, 1737; served in the French and Indian War, taking part in the expeditions against Ticonderoga, Crown Point, Fort Frontenac, and Niagara (1756-59), and was major in Colonel Johnson's regiment in 1759. On the breaking-out of the Revolutionary War, he was made colonel of the 2d New York Regiment, and late in 1776 was in command of a battalion sent to the vicinity of Cherry Valley to protect the inhabitants agai1759. On the breaking-out of the Revolutionary War, he was made colonel of the 2d New York Regiment, and late in 1776 was in command of a battalion sent to the vicinity of Cherry Valley to protect the inhabitants against Brant and his followers, in which work he was vigilant and active. In the battle of Monmouth he was a brigadier-general under Lord Stirling. In the spring of 1779 he was sent by Washington to destroy the settlement of the Onondaga Indians, for the performance of which service Congress gave him its thanks. He was made brigadier-general by brevet, Oct. 10, 1783. Van Schaick was a rigid disciplinarian, and his regiment one of the best in the service. He died in Albany, N. Y., July 4, 1787
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Waddell, Hugh 1734-1773 (search)
Waddell, Hugh 1734-1773 Military officer; born in Lisburn, Ireland, in 1734; settled in North Carolina in 1753; was made lieutenant in the regiment of Col. James Innes and took part in the Virginia campaign in 1758; built Fort Dobbs, which he commanded in 1756-57. During the expedition to Fort Duquesne in 1758 he commanded the North Carolina troops; promoted colonel in 1759. When the English war-vessel Diligence, which brought over the stamped paper, endeavored to land a detachment of troops at Brunswick in 1765, he seized the ship's boat, and compelled William Houston, the stamp officer, to sign a pledge in public, promising that he would never receive any stamped paper which might arrive from England, nor officiate in any way in the distribution of stamps in the province of North Carolina. In 1771 he conducted the campaign against the regulators. He died in Castle Haynes, N. C., April 9, 1773.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Warren, Joseph 1741- (search)
Warren, Joseph 1741- Physician; born in Roxbury, Mass., June 11, 1741; killed in battle, June 17, 1775; graduated at Harvard College in 1759; studied medicine; began practice in 1764 in Boston, and by his successful treatment of small-pox patients acquired a high reputation among the faculty. In politics he was in advance of public opinion in general, holding the doctrine that the British Parliament had no right to levy a tax of any kind upon the colonies. When, in 1772, Samuel Adams declined to deliver the annual oration on the anniversary of the Boston massacre, Dr. Warren took his place, and exhibited great ability. He again delivered the anniversary oration in 1775 in the midst of the danger caused by the presence of British troops and the exasperation of the citizens. He had been made a member of the Boston committee Joseph Warren. of correspondence in 1772, and worked incessantly and effectively for the cause of the colonists. He was a delegate to the Suffolk county
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