hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 1 1 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1821 AD or search for 1821 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 192 results in 173 document sections:

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Granger, Gordon 1821-1876 (search)
Granger, Gordon 1821-1876 Military officer; born in New York City, in 1821; graduated at West Point in 1845; served in the war with Mexico, and was made captain of cavalry in May, 1861. He served under Halleck and Grant in the West, and was made major-general of volunteers, Sept. 17, 1862. He commanded the district of Central Kentucky, was put in command of the 4th Army Corps after the battle of Chickamauga, was engaged in the struggle on Missionary Ridge, November, 1863, and was active i1821; graduated at West Point in 1845; served in the war with Mexico, and was made captain of cavalry in May, 1861. He served under Halleck and Grant in the West, and was made major-general of volunteers, Sept. 17, 1862. He commanded the district of Central Kentucky, was put in command of the 4th Army Corps after the battle of Chickamauga, was engaged in the struggle on Missionary Ridge, November, 1863, and was active in the military movements that led to the capture of Mobile in 1864, for which he was brevetted major-general of the United States army. He was mustered out of the volunteer service in 1866; was promoted to colonel in the regular army the same year; and died in Santa Fe, N. M., Jan. 10, 1876.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Green, Beriah 1794-1874 (search)
Green, Beriah 1794-1874 Reformer; born in New York in 1794; graduated at Middlebury College in 1819; became an independent clergyman; settled in Ohio in 1821, and became president of the Oneida Institute in 1824; was a leader in the organization of the American Anti-Slavery Society, and for some time its president. He was the author of History of the Quakers. He died in Whitestown, N. Y., May 4, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall, Charles Francis 1821- (search)
Hall, Charles Francis 1821- Explorer; born in Rochester, N. H., in 1821; in early life was first a blacksmith, and then a journalist in Cincinnati. In 1859 he appeared in New York, and at a meeting of the American Geographical Society he offered to go in search of the remains of Sir John Franklin. Funds for the purpose were raised, and in May, 1860, he sailed from New London, Conn., in a whaling vessel, commanded by Capt. Sidney O. Buddington. The vessel became locked in the ice. He made1821; in early life was first a blacksmith, and then a journalist in Cincinnati. In 1859 he appeared in New York, and at a meeting of the American Geographical Society he offered to go in search of the remains of Sir John Franklin. Funds for the purpose were raised, and in May, 1860, he sailed from New London, Conn., in a whaling vessel, commanded by Capt. Sidney O. Buddington. The vessel became locked in the ice. He made the acquaintance of the Eskimos, learned their language, acquired their friendship, and lived with them two years, making his way back to the United States in September, 1862, without having discovered any traces of Sir John Franklin and his party. He was accompanied by an Eskimo and his wife. His Arctic researches and life among the Eskimos was published in 1864. In July of that year he set out on another polar expedition, with Buddington, expecting to be absent two or three years, but did
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Halleck, Fitz-greene 1790-1867 (search)
Poet; born in Guilford, Conn., July 8, 1790; became a clerk in the banking-house of Jacob Barker at the age of eighteen years; and was long a confidential clerk with John Jacob Astor, who made him one of the first trustees of the Astor Library. From early boyhood he wrote verses. With Joseph Rodman Drake, he wrote the humorous series known as The Croker papers for the Evening post in 1819. His longest poem, Fanny, a satire upon the literature and politics of the times, was published in 1821. The next year he went to Europe, and in 1827 his Alnwick Castle, Marco Bozzaris, and other poems were published in a volume. Halleck was a genuine poet, but he wrote comparatively little. His pieces of importance are only thirty-two in number, and altogether Fitz-Greene Halleck. comprise only about 4,000 lines. Yet he wrote with great facility. His Fanny, in the measure of Byron's Don Juan, was completed and printed within three weeks after it was begun. Late in life he joined the Ro
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hamer, Thomas Lewis 1800- (search)
Hamer, Thomas Lewis 1800- Military officer; born in Pennsylvania about 1800; was admitted to the bar of Ohio in 1821; elected to the Ohio legislature; to Congress in 1833. It was he who nominated Ulysses S. Grant for a cadetship at West Point. During the Mexican War he reached the rank of brigadier-general of volunteers; was wounded at the battle of Monterey, and died there Dec. 2, 1846. Hamilton, Alexander
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hayne, Robert young -1839 (search)
outhern States. Sir, I am thoroughly convinced that, at this time, the States north of the Potomac actually derive greater profits from the labors of our slaves than we do ourselves. It appears from our public documents that in seven years, from 1821 to 1827 inclusive, the six Southern States exported $190,337,281 and imported only $55,646,301. Now, the difference between these two sums (near $140,000,000) passed through the hands of the Northern merchants, and enabled them to carry on their the infraction, and that a nullification of those sovereignties of all unauthorized acts done under color of that instrument is the rightful remedy. Time and experience confirmed Mr. Jefferson's opinion on this all-important point. In the year 1821 he expressed himself in this emphatic manner: It is a fatal heresy to suppose that either our State governments are superior to the federal, or the federal to the State; neither is authorized literally to decide which belongs to itself or its copa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hill, Daniel Harvey 1821-1889 (search)
Hill, Daniel Harvey 1821-1889 Military officer; born in York District, S. C., July 12, 1821; graduated at West Point in 1842; entered the artillery; served in the war with Mexico, and was brevetted captain and major; left the army in 1849, and became Professor of Mathematics—first in Washington College, Lexington, Va., and then in Davidson College, North Carolina. In 1859 he was principal of the Military Institute at Charlotte, N. C.; and when the Civil War broke out he joined the Confederates, becoming colonel of the 1st North Carolina Volunteers. He took part in the defence of Richmond in 1862, and was active in the seven days battle. He soon rose to the rank of major-general. He commanded the Department of the Appomattox, and in February, 1865, was in command at Augusta, Ga. He was a brother-in-law of Stonewall Jackson, and a skilful commander. In 1877 he became president of the University of Arkansas, and subsequently of the Georgia Military and Agricultural College. He
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hoskins, Nathan 1795-1869 (search)
Hoskins, Nathan 1795-1869 Author; born in Withersfield, Vt., April 27, 1795; graduated at Dartmouth in 1820; taught in St. Albans, Vt., in 1821-22; afterwards practised law in Vergennes, Vt., and edited The Vermont Aurora. His publications include History of Vermont; Notes on the West; and The Bennington Court controversy and strictures on Civil liberty in the United States. He died in Williamstown, Mass., April 21, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howe, Samuel Gridley 1801-1876 (search)
Howe, Samuel Gridley 1801-1876 Philanthropist; born in Boston, Mass., Nov. 10, 1801; graduated at Brown University in 1821; became a physician; and sympathizing with the Greeks in their struggle for independence, went there in 1824, and served as a surgeon in the army and in other capacities until 1830. In 1831 he became interested in the establishment of an institution for the blind in Boston. The Pekin Institute was the result. It was put in operation in 1832, with Dr. Howe at its head. In that institution, through the unwearied efforts of Dr. Howe, Laura Bridgman, a deaf, dumb, and blind girl, became educated. Dr. Howe, while in Europe, preparatory to opening the institution, engaged a little in politics, and was in a Prussian prison about six weeks. He was ever active in every good work. He went to Greece again in 1867, as bearer of supplies to the Cretans in their struggle with the Turks. In 1871 he was one of the commissioners sent by the government of the United Stat
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hughes, Robert William 1821- (search)
Hughes, Robert William 1821- Lawyer; born in Powhatan county, Va., June 16, 1821; educated at the Caldwell Institute, North Carolina; taught school in North Carolina in 1840-42; editor of the Richmond (Va.) Examiner in 1852-57, the Richmond Republic in 1865-6, and the Richmond State journal. He was United States district-attorney for western Virginia in 1871-73; Republican candidate for governor of Virginia in 1873; and author of Law reports; The currency question from a Southern Point of view; The American dollar; and lives of Generals Floyd and Johnston in Pollard's Lee and his Lieutenants.
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...