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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
men. This attack was signally repulsed by one Confederate brigade and eight light guns, with a loss to Sherman of 1,439 killed, wounded and missing, and seven stands of colors. This single trial decided the second attempt, as Sherman imagined he saw the bluff's fortifications, where none existed, but really only a few rifle pits hurriedly thrown up by the troops after arrival on the ground. He re-embarked his army on his transports, and disappeared from before Vicksburg about the 3d of January, 1863. His loss in the several days' fighting was 2,200 men killed, wounded and missing, and a loss to the Confederates of less than 200. The third and successful attempt to take the city was at once inaugurated by General Grant himself, who, early in January, 1863, moved part of his army which had been in the vicinity of Oxford (but had fallen back from Oxford to Memphis), down the Mississippi river, and uniting with Sherman's army, landed at Young's Point on the Louisiana side, not fa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Third Battery of Maryland Artillery, C. S. A. Its history in brief, and its commanders. (search)
hat battery took in the late war. I would like to give, through the medium of your paper, a correct version of the matter in a few words. The Third Maryland Battery was mustered into the Confederate States service January 14, 1862, at Richmond, Va., and was ordered to Knoxville, East Tennessee, February 4, 1862. Under General E. Kirby Smith it went into Kentucky, August, 1862. After the return of General Smith to Tennessee the battery was sent to Vicksburg, Miss., arriving there January 3, 1863. Shortly afterward one gun was sent to General Ferguson, on Deer Creek, Miss., and two guns to Fort DeRussa on Red river, which were put aboard the Queen of the West, after the capture of that vessel. Three guns, with the main body of the battery, were in the siege of Vicksburg, and at the capitulation, July 4, 1863, were surrendered. The battery was reorganized at Decatur, Ga., in October, 1863, and ordered to Sweet Water, Tenn., afterwards to Lookout Mountain, near Chattanooga.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Forty-Ninth N. C. Infantry, C. S. A. [from the Charlotte, N. C., Observer, October 20, 27, 1895.] (search)
y. Returning to Virginia, it participated in the battle of Fredericksburg, beginning December 11th, 1862, where it took position on the Plank road, and during the four days that the fighting there continued was subjected to heavy cannonading and some infantry fighting, several officers and men being killed and wounded; but the heaviest fighting was on the right of our lines and by other commands. After this battle the Forty-Ninth remained in winter quarters near Fredericksburg until January 3d, 1863, when it was marched, by the Telegraph road, to Hanover Junction, thence to Richmond, and from there to Petersburg, which it reached on the evening of the 7th, and remained until the 17th, when it left for eastern North Carolina. From this time on until the spring of 1864, the regiment, with the Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth, Thirty-fifth and Fifty-sixth regiments, composing General M. W. Ransom's brigade, protected the line of the Wilmington and Weldon railroad from those two terminal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
sing. This regiment was in command of Colonel S. B. Pickens, with L. Gayle as adjutant, J. C. Goodgame, lieutenant colonel, and A. Proskauer as major, J. L. Walthall, late of Company I was quartermaster, and A. T. Preston, of Woodville North Alabama, commissary. After we had been in camp about a week, while standing around the camp fires, waiting for the announcement of supper, the colonel's orderly, Jack Mallory, brought me an order as follows: Headquarters 12th Ala. Regiment, January 3rd, 1863. First Lieut. R. E. Park of Co. F, will report for duty as Acting A. Q. M. of the 12th Ala. Regiment. (Signed) S. B. Pickens, Col. Comdg., L. Gayle, Adjutant. This order was a great surprise to me, and not a welcome one, but, yielding to the persuasion of Captain McNeely and others, who thought it a compliment, I reported to Regimental Headquarters, where I told the colonel that I had little acquaintance with business affairs, having left college to join the army, and I fear
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 17., Medford Smelt and Smelt Brooks. (search)
us fish, [of] long slender shape and bright silvery sides; 6 to 8 inches long, and 6 to 10 weigh a pound. . . . Dr. Swan wrote B. L. S., His brother, Benjamin L. Swan, of Oyster Bay, N. Y. April 23, 1855— Over 5 Bushels were taken today in the brook in your meadow. And on April 10, 1856, Dr. Swan wrote to his brother Caleb— Timothy Swan caught a good mess of smelts last night; he says they have come quite plenty. Mr. Caleb Swan, living in New York, made note thus, January 3, 1863:— Some very small smelts are now brought to market in New York; they are sold to French restaurants. I had a pound of them counted this morning by James, my fishman, and there were 55 smelts. Historian Brooks also modestly mentions another Medford boy who caught smelts in these same brooks, in the same primitive fashion first named. Those fifty-five-to-a-pound smelts of the New York market were doubtless degenerate in Mr. Swan's estimation, as the brother doctor's letters fr<
Fifty dollars reward. --Ranaway from the subscriber, near the Hanover Junction, on Christmas day, a negro man named Jim. He is very stout and healthy, about 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, about 26 years old, of a light black complexion, and speaks quick. The above reward will be paid to any one who will deliver him to me, or place him in the Hanover county jail. He probably made his way towards Essex county. Chas, F. M. Garnett. Hanover Junction, Jan. 3. 1863 ja 5--6t*
Twenty-five dollars reward. --Ranaway on the 3d Jan., 1863, from Jordan Cox's Chesterfield county, Va., bay Sam; dark gingerbread color, about 5 feet tall, with a sear in the right temple, mullet mouth, two broad teeth in front, and full eyes. The above reward will be paid for his confinement in any place so that I can get hold of him. Address Jordan Cox. Chester field Post Office. ja 5--3t*
Fifty Dollars reward. --Ranaway from the subscriber, near the Hanover Junction, on Christmas day, a negro man named Jim. He is very stout and healthy, about 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, about 26 years old of a light black complexion, and speaks quick. The above reward will be paid to any one who will deliver him to me or place him in the Hanover county jail. He probably made his way towards Essex county. Chas. F. M. Garnett. Hanover Junction, Jan. 3, 1863. ja 5--6t*
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