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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 1 1 Browse Search
History of the First Universalist Church in Somerville, Mass. Illustrated; a souvenir of the fiftieth anniversary celebrated February 15-21, 1904 1 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 1 1 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gibbs, Alfred 1823- (search)
Gibbs, Alfred 1823- Military officer; born in Sunswick, Long Island, N. Y., April 23, 1823; graduated at West Point in 1846: served under Scott in Mexico, and afterwards against the Indians; and when the Civil War broke out he was in Texas. He was made prisoner, and when exchanged in 1862 he was made colonel of the 130th New York Volunteers, and served under Sheridan, in the latter part of the war, in command of a cavalry brigade. He was active in the Army of the Potomac at all times, and was a thoroughly trustworthy officer. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general of volunteers. He was mustered out of the service Feb. 1, 1860; was commissioned major of the 7th Cavalry on July 28 following; and served in Kansas till his death, in Fort Leavenworth, Dec. 26, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Griffin, Charles 1826- (search)
26- Military officer; born in Licking county, O., in 1826; graduated at West Point in 1847, and entered the artillery. He was made captain of artillery in April, 1861, and with his battery fought bravely in the battle of Bull Run. He was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers in July, 1862; served under General Potter in the campaign against Richmond, and was active in the Army of the Potomac until the surrender of Lee at Appomattox Court-house, where, as. commander of the 5th Corps, he received the arms and colors of the Army of Northern Virginia. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army, and received other brevets for meritorious services during the Rebellion. In the winter of 1865-66 he was placed in command of the Department of Texas, with headquarters in Galveston. On Sept. 5, 1867, when that city was scourged with yellow fever, he was given a temporary command in New Orleans, but he refused to leave his post, and died of the fever on the 15th.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hamlin, Charles 1837- (search)
Hamlin, Charles 1837- Lawyer; born in Hampden, Me., Sept. 13, 1837; son of Hannibal Hamlin; graduated at Bowdoin College in 1857; admitted to the bar in the following year; enlisted in the National army in 1862; brevetted brigadiergeneral of volunteers in March, 1865. He published the Insolvent laws of Maine, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harney, William Selby 1798-1889 (search)
848 he was brevetted brigadier-general for his services in the battle of Cerro Gordo (q. v.). He was promoted to brigadiergeneral in 1858, and placed in command of the Department of Oregon; and in July. 1859, took possession of the island of San Juan, near Vancouver, which England claimed to be a part of British Columbia, and which the United States soon afterwards evacuated. Harney then commanded the Department of the West; and in April. 1861, while on his way to Washington, he was arrested by the Confederates at Harper's Ferry, Va., and taken to Richmond. He was soon released, and, on returning to St. Louis, issued proclamations warning the people of Missouri of the dangers of secession. In consequence of an unauthorized truce with Price, the Confederate leader. Harney was relieved of his command. He retired in August, 1863; was brevetted major-general, United States army, in March, 1865; and was a member of the Indian Commission in 1867. He died in Orlando, Fla.. May 9. 1889.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hartranft, John Frederick 1830-1889 (search)
born in New Hanover, Montgomery co., Pa., Dee. 16, 1830; graduated at Union College in 1853, and admitted to the bar in 1859. He commanded the 4th Pennsylvania (three months) regiment; then organized the 51st Pennsylvania Regiment, and as its colonel accompanied Burnside's expedition to North Carolina early in 1862. He was in all the operations of that corps (the 9th), and was made brigadier-general in May, 1864. At Antietam he led the famous charge that carried the lower bridge (see Antietam, battle of), and was in command of the division of the 9th Corps that gallantly recaptured Fort Steadman, before Petersburg, in March, 1865, for which he was brevetted majorgeneral. He was elected governor of Pennsylvania in 1872 and 1875; pursued a vigorous policy during the great railroad strikes in July, 1877; was appointed major-general commanding the State militia in 1879; and was afterwards postmaster and collector of the port in Philadelphia. He died in Norristown, Pa., Oct. 17. 1889.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hartsuff, George Lucas 1830-1874 (search)
d first in Texas and Florida. In 1856 he was assistant instructor in artillery and infantry tactics at West Point. He was made assistant adjutantgeneral, with the rank of captain, in March, 1861; served at Fort Pickens from April till July, 1861, and then in western Virginia, under General Rosecrans. In April, 1862, he was made brigadier-general of volunteers, and commanded Abercrombie's brigade in the battles of Cedar Mountain, Manassas, and Antietam, receiving a severe wound in the latter engagement. In November he was promoted to major-general; and in the spring of 1863 was sent to Kentucky, where he commanded the 23d Corps. He was in command of the works at Bermuda Hundred in the siege of Petersburg, 1864-65. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general in the United States army; in 1867-71 was adjutant-general of the 5th Military Division and of the Division of the Missouri; and in the latter year was retired because of his wounds. He died in New York City, May 16, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hayes, Rutherford Birchard 1822-1893 (search)
yon College, O., in 1842, and at the Cambridge Law School in 1845; practised law in Cincinnati until 1861, when he became first major, and then colonel, of the 23d Regiment Ohio Volunteers, first serving in western Virginia. He was wounded in the battle of South Mountain, Md.; and from December, 1862, to September, 1864, commanded the 1st Brigade, Kanawha division. He was appointed brigadier-general in October, 1864, for gallant conduct at Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek. In March, 1865, he was brevetted majorgeneral of volunteers, and in the same year was elected to Congress. In 1867 he was elected governor of Ohio, and in 1869 and 1875 was re-elected. In 1877 he was declared President of the United States by a majority of one in the Electoral College over Samuel J. Tilden (see electoral commission). He died in Fremont, O., Jan. 17, 1893. March 4, 1877, fell on Sunday. President-elect Hayes was in Washington, the guest of Senator John Sherman. There had been thre
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Holt, Joseph 1807-1894 (search)
Holt, Joseph 1807-1894 Jurist; born in Breckenridge county, Ky., Jan. 6, 1807; acquired a collegiate education; and entered upon the practice of law in 1828. He followed his profession in Kentucky and Mississippi until 1857, when President Buchanan appointed him commissioner of patents, and, in 1859, Postmaster-General. When John B. Floyd left the cabinet at the close of 1860, Mr. Holt assumed charge of the War Department, in which post he was watchful and efficient. In 1863 he was appointed judge-advocate of the army, and was a thorough supporter of Lincoln's administration throughout. In 1864 he was placed at the head of the bureau of military justice, and declined the cabinet appointment of Attorney-General. He was brevetted major-general of the United States army in March, 1865, and was retired, Dec. 1, 1875. He died in Washington, D. C., Aug. 1, 1894.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, Fitzhugh 1835- (search)
entered the army as second lieutenant of the 2d Cavalry. In 1860 he was appointed instructor of cavalry at West Point, and in 1861 he resigned his commission to become adjutant-general under Ewell, in the Confederate army. From September, 1861, to July, 1862, he was lieutenant-colonel and colonel of the 1st Virginia Cavalry, with which he took part in all the movements of the Army of Northern Virginia. He was then promoted brigadier-general, and, on Sept. 3, 1863, major-general. From March, 1865, until he surrendered to General Meade, at Farmville, he commanded the whole cavalry corps of the Army of Northern Virginia. In 1886-90 he was governor of Virginia. In 1896 President Cleveland appointed him United States consul-general at Havana, where he served till war was declared against Spain. In May, 1898, President McKinley appointed him a major-general of volunteers; in December following he became governor of the province of Havana; and, on the reorganization of the regular ar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Long, Eli 1837- (search)
Long, Eli 1837- Military officer; born in Woodford county, Ky., June 16, 1837; was educated at a military school in Frankfort, Ky.; and in 1856 was appointed a second lieutenant in the 1st United States Cavalry. He served in campaigns against the Indians, and in May, 1861, was made captain. He did good service throughout the Civil War, rising rapidly until he commanded a division; in March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general of volunteers; and in August, 1867, was retired with the rank of major-general, United States army, because of wounds received in action. General Long's most brilliant exploit was the capture by cavalry of Selma, Ala., April 2, 1865. Selma was defended by earthworks intended to resist infantry. Thirty pieces of artillery in position, with a gar rison of about 3,000 of General Forrest's cavalry, and 2,000 militia. The works were taken within a half-hour after the advance was sounded. Three hundred and twenty officers and men out of 1,250 engaged wer
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