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847 Collectors, Benj. Lincoln, in office, 1796 Henry Dearborn, in office, 1809 Henry A. S. Dearborn, in office, 1813 David Henshaw, in office, 1829 George Bancroft, in office, 1838 Levi Lincoln, in office, 1841 Robert Rantoul, in office, 1844 Marcus Morton, in office, 1845 Charles Greeley, Jr., in office, 1849 Charles H. Peaslee, in office, 1853 Arthur W. Austin, in office, 1857 James S. Whitney, in office, 1860 John Z. Goodrich, in office, 1861 Hannibal Hamlin, in office, 1866 Thomas Russell, in office, 1867 William A. Simmons, in office, 1874 Alanson W. Beard, in office, 1878 Roland Worthington, in office, 1882 D. Daguerreotype likenesses first taken in Boston, Mar. 10, 1840 Dancing in taverns prohibited by law, 1651 On ropes, prohibited by law, May 28, 1735 Dancing Schools, prohibited by law, 1673 One opened by George Brownwell, May 28, 1735 Halls. Thirty open in Ann street, 12 o'clock night, Sep.
tform, the Union, the Constitution and the enforcement of the laws. The Republican party held its convention in Chicago, May 18th, and nominated Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois (a son of Kentucky and a grandson of Virginia), for President, and Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine for Vice-President, and declared itself in favor of the prohibition of slavery in the Territories by congressional action. The candidates nominated and the platform of each party defined, a fierce political contest was waged throughout the extent of the Union, during the months of July, August, September and October. The election was held on November 6th, with these results: Lincoln and Hamlin received 180 electoral votes, from eighteen States all lying north of Mason and Dixon's line; Breckinridge and Lane received 72 votes, all from Southern States, including Delaware and Maryland; Bell and Everett received the votes, 39 in number, of Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee; while Douglas and Johnson received 12 votes, tho
ed and practiced law until the Mexican war, when he recruited a company of cavalry and was present at the battle of Buena Vista under the command of the famous Col. Charles May. In 1848 he fought a duel with Gen. John S. Roane on account of something said by him in his story of that battle, which the governor considered as reflecting unjustly on the Arkansas regiment. In 1849 he was admitted to the bar of the Supreme court of the United States at the same time with Abraham Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin. In 1853 he moved to New Orleans, having prepared himself for practice in the courts of Louisiana by reading the Pandects, of which he translated the first volume into English. He also made translations of many French authorities. He wrote, besides, an unpublished work of three volumes upon The Maxims of the Roman and French Law. In 1857 he resumed practice in Arkansas. He acted for many years as attorney for the Choctaw Indians, and in 1859, assisted by three others, he secured fo
l pass, as a patriot, I feel bound to take the side of my native State in any contest which might grow out of it. I will vote against the ordinance. On the 11th of January, the secession of Alabama from the Federal Union was accomplished. I give the full text of the act: An Ordinance to dissolve the union between the State of Alabama and other States united under the compact styled The Constitution of the United States of America. Whereas, The election of Abraham Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin to the offices of President and VicePresi-dent of the United States of America, by a sectional party, avowedly hostile to the domestic institutions and to the peace and security of the people of the State of Alabama, preceded by many and dangerous infractions of the Constitution of the United States by many of the States and people of the Northern section, is a political wrong of so insulting and menacing a character as to justify the people of the State of Alabama in the adoption of pr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
, in 1860, the alignment of parties demonstrated that the election of either Mr. Lincoln or Mr. Breckinridge to the Presidency would be followed by a rupture, and so Virginia, with her eldest daughter, Kentucky, alone of the States of the Union except Tennessee, cast her vote for Bell and Everett, the Union candidates, standing on the platform, The Constitution of the country; the Union of the States, and the enforcement of the laws. But Mr. Lincoln and his associate upon the ticket, Hannibal Hamlin, were elected, and for the first time in the history of the government these high offices were to be filled by men from one section of the country, elected by the electoral votes only of States from the same geographical division, and that too despite the fact that the opposing tickets combined received a majority of over a million of the popular vote. Following the election of Mr. Lincoln, under the leadership of South Carolina and Cotton States, seven in number, withdrew from the U
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A noble life. (search)
cClure's Magazine for 1899 (page 277), calls Sumner, Wade, Winter Davis and Chase malicious foes of Lincoln, on the authority of one of Lincoln's closest intimates, Leonard Swet, and in the same magazine for July, 1899 (page 218, et seq.), says: About all the most prominent leaders * * * were actively opposed to Lincoln, and mentions Greeley as their chief. McClure's Lincoln, etc. (page 54, et seq.), shows the hostility to Lincoln of Sumner, Trumbull and Chandler, and of his Vice-President, Hamlin. Fremont, who, eight years before, had received every Republican vote for President, charged Lincoln (Holland's Life, etc., page 469, et seq.,) with incapacity and selfishness, with disregarding personal rights, with violation of personal liberty and the liberty of the press, with feebleness and want of principle, and we find (page 470, et seq.,) quoted from a letter of Fremont: Had Lincoln remained faithful to the principles he was elected to defend, no schism could have been created and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
cClure's Magazine for 1899 (page 277), calls Sumner, Wade, Winter Davis and Chase malicious foes of Lincoln, on the authority of one of Lincoln's closest intimates, Leonard Swet, and in the same magazine for July, 1899 (page 218, et seq.), says: About all the most prominent leaders * * * were actively opposed to Lincoln, and mentions Greeley as their chief. McClure's Lincoln, etc. (page 54, et seq.), shows the hostility to Lincoln of Sumner, Trumbull and Chandler, and of his Vice-President, Hamlin. Fremont, who, eight years before, had received every Republican vote for President, charged Lincoln (Holland's Life, etc., page 469, et seq.,) with incapacity and selfishness, with disregarding personal rights, with violation of personal liberty and the liberty of the press, with feebleness and want of principle, and we find (page 470, et seq.,) quoted from a letter of Fremont: Had Lincoln remained faithful to the principles he was elected to defend, no schism could have been created and
d his son and grandson of the same name held the same office. Thomas Livermore was appointed deacon October 3, 1718; his homestead afterwards passed into the hands of Jonas Clarke, Sen. So many of the leading men in the church resided here, near to each other, that the name Piety Corner was given to the locality around the junction of Bacon and Beaver Streets. Captain John Clarke Captain John Clarke was the son of Deacon John Clarke, whose sister Hannah was maternal grandmother of Hon. Hannibal Hamlin of Maine. She married Deacon Elijah Livermore, father of the town of Livermore, Maine, and her daughter Anna, born in Waltham, was the mother of the distinguished Senator and Vice-President, who thus had Deacon Samuel Livermore as his maternal great-grandfather, the mother of whose children was a sister of Deacon William Brown, of Waltham. lived here, the eldest brother of Jonas just named. The Clarkes had a grist-mill on the site of the present machine-shop of George F. Shedd on Ch
ern (the) , public dinner at, 89. Grist-mill, the first, 123; child carried under the wheel, 124. Groton attacked by Indians, 61. Groton. Suffolk Co., England, 23 n 1. Guild, Rev. Edward C., pastor of First Parish, 117. Gun, firing of a, after night watches punished by whipping, 18; heavy fine for one that should permit an Indian to use a, 23. Hagar: Amos, 85: Benjamin, Isaac, Jonathan, 88; Joseph, 71, 93; Lois, William, 89. Hagar's lane once well settled, 93. Hamlin, Hon., Hannibal, maternal ancestors of, 97 n. 3. Hammond: Ephraim, 95; Jonathan, 90, 95; Deacon Thomas, 71, 95. Hancock, John: votes cast for him for Governor, 105. Hardy's Pond, 81 n. 1. Harold, son of Earl Godwin, 66; received Waltham (Eng.)from Edward the Confessor, 67. Harrington: Amos, 87; once the richest man in town, 88 n. 1; Benjamin, 93; Josiah, 71; Samuel, 96. Harrington, George, killed. 61. Harrington, Robert, bought half of Oldham Farm, 39, 61 n. 6. Harrington Tavern,
the points which need defence, with plans for the same. To carry out this bill, the Committee on Military report in favor of an appropriation of $400,000. In Florida, a public meeting was held at Fernandina, on the 5th inst., at which resolutions were adopted calling on the Legislature to call a State Convention. The following resolutions were also adopted: Whereas, We are advised of the certainty of the election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States, and Hannibal Hamlin, Vice-President, upon a sectional platform, at variance with the Constitution of the United States, and derogatory to the rights and interests of the Southern States: Therefore, be it Resolved. That we regard such election as a virtual dissolution of the Union under the present Constitution. Resolved.That we have heard with great satisfaction the resignation of the Hon. A. G. McGrath, United States District Judge for the State of South Carolina, and James Conner, Esq. United S
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