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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 23, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of his cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania in October, 1862. (search)
dition into Pennsylvania with a cavalry force of 1,800 and four pieces of horse artillery, under command of Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at 12 M., and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, where it camped for the night. At daylight next morning (Octothe hospital were paroled. During the day a large number of horses of citizens were seized and brought along. The wires were cut and railroad obstructed, and Colonel Jones' command was sent up the railroad toward Harrisburg to destroy a trestlework a few miles off. He however reported that it was constructed of iron, and he couldwards the inhabitants is worthy of the highest praise; a few individual cases only were exceptions in this particular. Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels Lee, Jones, Wickham and Butler, and the officers and men under their command are entitled to my lasting gratitude for their coolness in danger and cheerful obedience to order
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters on the treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
if you desire it, will confer with you or any officer you may designate. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Sam. Jones, Major-General Commanding. To Major-General J. G. Foster, U. S. A., Commanding Department of the South, Hilton Head, Sed it would promptly reach you by the route you were pleased to indicate. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Sam. Jones, Major-General Commanding. To Major-General J. G. Foster, Commanding United States Forces, Hilton Head. Hdrs. Departill confer with you, or any officer of your staff whom you may designate. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Sam. Jones, Major-General Commanding. To Major-General J. G. Foster, Commanding United States Forces, Hilton Head. Hdrs. Departe had been sent from here before I received your letter in regard to him I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Sam. Jones, Major-General Commanding. To Major-General J. G. Foster, Commanding U. S. Forces, Department of the South, Hilton Hea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
in the best regulated offices. It will appear at the end of the entire Roster. The Confederate Roster is nearly complete, and has excited considerable interest and attention. That some errors should have crept into it, and some omissions have occurred, is not to be wondered at. Indeed, no one can have any tolerable conception of the immense amount of labor it has cost to dig out a Roster from the imperfect records to be had, without admiring the patient research which our friend, Colonel Jones, has shown, and wondering that his work contains so few errors or omissions. After the publication of the Roster in its present form is completed, it is designed to thoroughly revise and correct it, make such additions to it as may be necessary, and then publish it in separate book form. Meantime the author is exceedingly anxious to make it as accurate and complete as possible, and we would esteem it a favor if any one detecting errors or omissions would write us the necessary correc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Maryland troops in the Confederate service. (search)
red the cavalry and artillery. The total length of service of the First regiment was fourteen to sixteen months. Second Maryland infantry. The Second Maryland infantry was organized in the fall of 1862, and numbered six companies. Two other companies joined them afterward, one in about two months and the other about a year after their organization. They were in service up to the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox. During the fall and winter of 1862-3 they were attached to General Jones' cavalry brigade, and were on duty in the Valley of Virginia; being constantly on the move, and made two very severe marches to Moorefield in West Virginia. In June, 1863, they joined General Early at Kernstown, and opened the battle at that point preparatory to attacking Winchester. That General, in his official report of the Gettysburg campaign, thus mentions this fact: I found Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert, of the Maryland line, with his battalion of infantry, the battery of Maryla
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cavalry operations in May, 1863--report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
Too much praise cannot be awarded the brave men who thus bore fatigue, hunger, loss of sleep, and danger without a murmur. The operations of Brigadier-General W. H. F. Lee, with his handful of men, are embraced in the memoranda furnished by him. His report is not only satisfactory, but gives evidence of sagacity and good conduct throughout, and of great efficiency on the part of his command. The result shows that the disposition made of these two commands was absolutely necessary. Jones' brigade was entirely out of reach, and Hampton was south of James river recruiting. That Stoneman with a large cavalry force was allowed to penetrate into the heart of the State, though comparatively harmless in results, is due to the entire inadequacy in numbers of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia. The enemy has confronted us with at least three divisions of cavalry, more or less concentrated, which we opposed with one division, spread from the Chesapeake to the Alleghany,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville--report of General R. E. Lee. (search)
orks behind which the enemy's artillery was posted. Three times were these works carried, and as often were the brave assailants compelled to abandon them — twice by the retirement of the troops on their left, who fell back after a gallant struggle with superior numbers, and once by a movement of the enemy on their right, caused by the advance of General Anderson. The left being reinforced, finally succeeded in driving back the enemy, and the artillery, under Lieutenant-Colonels Carter and Jones, being thrown forward to occupy favorable positions, secured by the advance of the infantry, began to play with great precision and effect. Anderson, in the mean time pressed gallantly forward, directly upon Chancellorsville, his right resting upon the plank road and his left extending around the furnace, while McLaws made a strong demonstration to the right of the road. As the troops advancing upon the enemy's front and right converged upon his central position, Anderson effected a juncti
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Samuel Jones of operations at Charleston, South Carolina, from December 5th to 27th, 1864. (search)
Report of Major-General Samuel Jones of operations at Charleston, South Carolina, from December 5th to 27th, 1864. [The following Is from the original Ms. kindly furnished us by the gallant soldier who prepared it, and never before published tols, I respectfully refer to the reports of subordinate commanders. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Samuel Jones, Major-General. To Colonel T. B. Ray, A. A. G., Department South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, Charleston, South Car-General, Charleston, South Carolina: Major — I have the honor to report that in obedience to instructions from Major-General Jones, I assumed command of all the troops between Bee's creek and Tulifinny trestle on the 8th of December, ultimo. Stringfellow, Assistant Adjutant-General, Charleston, South Carolina: Major — In obedience to instructions from Major-General Jones, dated Pocotaligo, December 6, 1864, directing me to attack the enemy early on the 7th, in his position near this
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of seven Pines-report of General James Longstreet. (search)
tment, kindly and untiringly devoted themselves to the wounded, They have none of the chances of distinction of other officers, but discharge the most important duties. I refer to his report for the conduct of the officers of his department. Detailed reports of the major-generals, brigadiers and other commanders and chiefs of staff have been called for, and will be forwarded as soon as received. Our loss invaluable officers and men has been severe. Colonels Giles, Fifth South Carolina; Jones, Twelfth Alabama; Lomax, Third Alabama, fell at the head of their commands, gallantly leading them to victory. Three hundred and forty-seven prisoners, ten pieces of artillery, five thousand small arms, one garrison flag and several regimental standards were taken. A rough estimate of the loss on this part of the field may be put at three thousand killed and wounded. The loss on the part of the enemy may be put at a much higher figure, inasmuch as he was driven from his positions, and so
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers at Gettysburg. (search)
Virginia in the spring, to wit: the Twenty-second Virginia of General Sam. Jones' command, the Twenty-fifth Virginia of Johnson's division, antomac, there being about 4,500 in the two brigades of Robertson and Jones. He further says that the losses in action in these three brigadesre it crossed the Potomac, and White's battalion, which belonged to Jones' brigade, did not exceed 200. 6,000, therefore, will cover all the n this estimate I do not include the cavalry brigades of Robertson, Jones and Imboden, which did not arrive in time to take part in the battlent at Gettysburg, without making any deduction for Robertson's and Jones' brigades. It is, however, when the Comte de Paris comes to estions and batteries of artillery, as will be seen by reference to Colonel Jones' roster, which is imperfect in not giving all the regiments we 4,000 in the three brigades with him, and 3,500 with Robertson and Jones? The Comte de Paris must not be surprised if he is suspected of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
ties for knowing whereof he affirms.] While the Army of Tennessee was in winter quarters at Dalton, Georgia, General Breckinridge was, early in February, 1864, ordered to the command of the Department of Southwestern Virginia. He repaired to Richmond about the middle of that month, and there remained nearly a fortnight in consultation with the President and War Department, gathering information and receiving instructions concerning his new command. On the 5th of March he relieved General Samuel Jones, and formally assumed command of the Department of Southwestern Virginia, with headquarters at Dublin station, a depot on the Virginia and East Tennessee railroad a few miles west of New river. His new command included all of East Tennessee occupied by the Confederate forces and all of Virginia west of the Blue Ridge. Its great extent of exposed front, with the small force for its protection, had always rendered it a precarious command, and it had proved disastrous to several of his
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