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The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 1 1 Browse Search
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enius, we must look far and wide through our land, and through our age, to find any who have equalled him in this loyalty of conviction,—this sublime tenacity of righteousness. For this, as he lies to-day in the Capitol of his grand old State, he is mourned and honored. For this, to-morrow, the overshadowing regret of a nation, and the tears of an emancipated race, will follow to the grave of Charles Sumner. Rev. O. B. Frothingham—the author of that noble Biography of a noble life—Theodore Parker's: Charles Sumner was a statesman who knew what statesmanship was meant for. He kept before him all the time the idea of the State. He did not wish to put his hand into the treasury; he did not seek or ask to be sent to the Senate because he might have an independent fortune, for the reputation of a public man, complimented and flattered by his countrymen. He felt himself a servant of the public. He was a man who carried his consciousness so far that he seemed to be visionary, a <
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
Boston, having been only eight hours on the journey. . . . Dear brother Henry was at the depot, and clapped his hand H. E. Benson. upon my shoulder as soon as I put my foot upon the soil, giving me quite a brotherly welcome. We then rode to Miss Parker's In Hayward Place. The Mays boarded with her. President Boston Fem. (where I am to remain), and were just in season to take tea. A. S. Soc. It was quite refreshing to see familiar faces once more. Mr. and Mrs. May sat at my right hand, Benson. in good style and fine fellowship-one of us upon a sofabed-stead, and two upon settees, which are not quite so soft, to be sure, as ours at Brooklyn. I have had invitations to stay with friends Fuller, Southwick, and Shattuck, and at Miss Parker's, but prefer to be independent. The arrangements for the Liberator are not yet definitely made, but I think all past affairs will soon be settled. Our friend Sewall's intended, Miss Winslow, is now in the S. E. Sewall. city, and was at
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
t on Wednesday, the 2d of March, and, in company with S. J. May, proceeded on that day as far as Providence. W. L. Garrison to his Wife, at Brooklyn. Boston, March 5, 1836. Ms. . . . At 8 o'clock, next morning, we left for Boston in the stage-coach, (on runners), the rail-cars being obstructed by the ice. Arrived safely at 3 o'clock P. M. Mr. May was delighted to find his wife and his little one in prosperous health. A very kind reception was given to me by all the friends at Miss Parker's. Called immediately upon Mrs. Chapman, who was exceedingly glad to see me again in the city, especially at this crisis. In the course of the afternoon, our Board of Managers held a meeting at Mr. Sewall's office, with reference to the defence that we should make the next day before the Legislative Committee. It was finally arranged that Mr. May should open the defence by stating the prominent facts respecting the rise and progress of the abolition cause, and the object and motives of
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
arrison's thoughts, so far from being driven in and concentrated upon the one abolition reform, were taking a wider range, among subjects upon which much light remains to be thrown, and which are of the utmost importance to the temporal and eternal welfare of man. In this he was but sharing the spirit of the age—a spirit of almost universal ferment, which perhaps exhibited its greatest activity and its greatest moderation in Massachusetts. As Mr. Frothingham well says, in his Life of Theodore Parker, all institutions and all ideas P. 125. went into the furnace of reason, and were tried by fire. Church and state were put to the proof, and the wood, hay, stubble—everything combustible—were consumed. The beginning of this period may be sought as far back Goodell's Slavery and Anti-Slavery, p. 387. as 1825, R. W. Emerson refers this era of activity, this schism between the party of the Past and the party of the Future: the Establishment and the Movement, to 1820 and the twenty y<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
with Lib. 10.135. littleknown Second-Adventists and Come-outers. The Rev. Theo. Parker. Non-Resistance Convention was next in order, being the Lib. 10.159, 180bove-named and of the Rev. Wm. H. Channing (a nephew of Dr. Channing), the Rev. Theodore Parker, the Rev. Robert F. Wallcut, A graduate of Harvard College in the cies. Among the interested but passive spectators Lib. 10.194. Weiss's Life of Parker, 1.158. were Dr. Channing, who, as Theodore Parker reports, doubted the proprieTheodore Parker reports, doubted the propriety of the Convention, since it looks like seeking agitation, and [he] fears the opinion of Garrison, Quincy, and Maria W. Chapman; and R. W. Emerson, who has left the, the Rev. N. Colver, the Rev. John Pierpont, the Rev. Samuel Osgood, the Rev. Theodore Parker, and others, and did not prevail with the meeting. Garrison, neverthe Phelps, Colver, &c., took the affirmative of the Sabbath question; Garrison, T. Parker, and Rev. A. A. Phelps. others the negative. Phelps was ingenious though so
peal, 167; after Harrison's election, 428. Frothingham, Octavius Brooks, Rev. [b. 1822], Life of G. Smith, 1.300, of T. Parker, 2.143 Fry, Elizabeth [1780-1845], portrait, 1.359; meets G., 2.384, 385. Fugitive-slave cases, in 1828, 1.112, iodges him, 84; presides at Ladies' A. S. Convention, 131; letters from S. M. Grimke, 134; at Penn. Hall, 217. Parker, Theodore, Rev. [1810-1860], befriended by F. Jackson, 1.454; at Groton Convention, 2.421, at Chardon St., 422, 424-426; Life, 144.—Portrait (best for this period) in Frothingham's Life of Parker. Parkman, Daniel, commits G. to jail, 2.24, 28, protects him against mob, 25, 26, kindness, 29; talk with Knapp, 40. Parmenter, William [1789-1866], 2.287. Parrish, Joseph, Jdebt, 269; church quarrel, 454; at Chardon St. Convention, 2.425.—Portrait in Harper's Monthly, Jan., 1880. Pillsbury, Parker [b. Hamilton, Mass., Sept. 22, 1809], Acts of A. S. Apostles, 2.289. Pinckney, Henry Laurens [1794-1863], gag resoluti
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: transcendentalism (search)
ey. Brook Farm. the Dial. Margaret Fuller. Parker. abolitionism. the relations of European ando joined the group at later meetings were Theodore Parker, Margaret Fuller, Orestes A. Brownson, Elnterprise and that while Emerson, Alcott, Theodore Parker, and Margaret Fuller were interested and the literary critic of transcendentalism, Theodore Parker (1810-1860) is its theologian and reformer. Parker was a graduate of Harvard and of the Harvard Divinity School, and held pastorates near orut in the development of American theology. Parker, though his nature was not lacking in qualitieh in 1860. These anti-slavery activities of Parker came, of course, after the crest of the transcinto a phase of social or political activity. Parker's life reveals with special clearness the linkism of Ripley and the other Brook Farmers. In Parker it takes on particularly the form of extreme ts! even Alcott planting aspiring vegetables), Parker risking reputation and life in the anti-slaver
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
quis, 343 Othello, 225 Otis, James, 30 Otis, James, Jr., 125,126, 127, 128, 129, Otway, 116, 117 Ouabi, or the virtues of nature, 178 Over-soul, the, 336, 352 Ovid, 16 Owen, Robert, 339 Owen, Robert Dale, 225 P Paine, Robert Treat, Jr., 178-179 Paine, Thomas, 74, 77, 91, 99, 102, 123, 140 1, 142, 4, 144, 67 Pamela, 64, 284 Pamphlets on the Constitution, 148 n. Papers on literature and art, 343 Paradise lost, 265, 274 Pardey, Henry 0., 230 Parker, Theodore, 333, 340, 344-345, 347 Parkinson, Richard, 190, 206 Parks, William, 117 Parmenius, Stephen, 3 Parnassus, 276 Parnell, Thomas, 177 Partisan, the, 314, 315 Partisan leader, 312 Past, the, 270 Pathfinder, the, 209, 303 Patriot's appeal, 167 Paul and Alexis, 231 Paul Jones, the, 183 Paulding, James Kirke, 208, 238-239, 240, 247, 262, 278, 307, 308, 310, 311, 319 Pauw, 188, 207 Payne, John Howard, 220, 224, 231 Peabody, Elizabeth, 333, 341 Peabody, Soph
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, Biographical sketch of Wendell Phillips. (search)
els of his riper life. For many years he was a popular lecturer, appearing on the platform in most of the Northern cities. His lecture on The lost arts, which was rather a series than a single work, and which was ever changing form and seeking new truths, was one of the most finished productions of the modern type of mind. Among his other subjects, winning for him constant admiration, may be mentioned Street life in Europe, Toussaint l'ouverture, Daniel O'Connell, and his eulogies on Theodore Parker and John Brown. Among his published writings, the following are noteworthy-The Constitution a pro-slavery Contract, 1844; Can Abolitionists vote or take office? 1845; Review of Spooner's Unconstitutionality of Slavery, 1847; Addresses, 1850; Review of Webster's seventh-of-march speech, 1850; Review of Kossuth's course, 1851; Defence of the Anti-slavery movement, 1851. All of these productions were received with approbation by the followers of his doctrines, but with bitter condemna
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 7 (search)
es such a course. But I cannot ask of a poor, friendless, broken-hearted fellow-creature such a momentous sacrifice. I do say, in private, to every one that comes to me, But one course is left for you. There is no safety for you here, there is no law for you here. The hearts of the judges are stone, the hearts of the people are stone. It is in vain that you appeal to the Abolitionists. They may be ready, may be able, ten years hence. But the brace of Adamses, to which our friend [Theodore Parker] alluded this morning, if they had mistaken 1765 for 1775, would have ended at the scaffold instead of the Declaration of Independence and the treaty of 1783. We must bide our time, and we must read, with anointed eyes, the signs of our time. If public opinion is wrong, we want to know it; know it, that we may remodel it. We will ourselves trample this accursed Fugitive Slave Law under foot. [Great cheering.] But we are a minority at present, and cannot do this to any great practical
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