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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The relation of a Voyage made by a Pilot called Nuno da Silva for the Vice-roy of new Spaine, the 20. of May, in the yere of our Lord 1579. in the citie of Mexico , from whence it was sent to the Vice-roy of the Portugall-Indies: wherein is set downe the course and actions passed in the Voyage of Sir Francis Drake that tooke the aforesayd Nuno da Silva at S. Iago one of the Islands of Cabo Verde, and caried him along with him through the Streights of Magellan, to the Haven of Guatulco in new Spaine, where he let him goe againe. (search)
ast, sayling Westward, taking the sayd frigate and her men with them, and having sailed two dayes, the tooke their men out of her, and set them in the pinnesse, among the which were foure sailers, that meant to sayle to Panama, and from thence to China , whereof one they tooke, with the letters and patents that hee had about him, among the which were the letters of the king of Spaine, sent to the governour of the Philippinas, as also the sea-cards wherewith they should make their voyage, and dirch they tooke certaine packes and other wares, but I know not what it was. They likewise tooke a Negro out of it, and three dayes after they both let the ship and men goe whether they woulde, setting therein the two saylers that should goe for China , which they had taken in the frigate, keeping onely one sailer to shewe them where they should find fresh water, to the which ende they tooke the emptie vessels with them to fill with water, and so kept on their course to the haven of Guatulco, w
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage intended towards China , wherein M. Edward Fenton was appointed Generall: Written by M. Luke Ward his Viceadmiral, and Captaine of the Edward Bonaventure, begun Anno Dom. 1582. (search)
The voyage intended towards China , wherein M. Edward Fenton was appointed Generall: Written by M. Luke Ward his Viceadmiral, and Captaine of the Edward Bonaventure, begun Anno Dom. 1582.THE second of April I departed with the Edward Bonaventure from Blackwall, and the 19 of the same arrived in Nettle roade at Hampton , where I found riding the Gallion Leicester: and so remaining there till the first of May, wee set saile thence in the forenoone, being of us in the whole fleete foure saile. 1vington and Ralph Crane Master. We spent by meanes partly of businesse, and partly of contrary windes, the moneth of May upon the coast, and then leaving the land wee put off to sea, and proceeded on our voyage intended by the grace of God for China : untill the moneth of August following, nothing fell out much worthy the knowledge of the worlde, which is not common to all navigants, but about the beginning of August aforesayd, being somewhat neere the coast of Guinie, upon the shooting off a
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse of the West Indies and South sea written by Lopez Vaz a Portugal , borne in the citie of Elvas , continued unto the yere 1587. Wherein among divers rare things not hitherto delivered by any other writer, certaine voyages of our Englishmen are truely reported: which was intercepted with the author thereof at the river of Plate, by Captaine Withrington and Captaine Christopher Lister, in the fleete set foorth by the right Honorable the Erle of Cumberland for the South sea in the yeere 1586. (search)
y were sought for. The Portugales therefore having first found and conquered the East Indies, and discovered the coast of China , with the Ilands of the Malucos, (all which places abound with gold, precious stones, silkes, and other rich commodities)Espanna called Don Luis de Velasco caused certaine ships to be built for the discovery of the Malucos and of the coast of China : which shippes in sayling thitherward found certaine Islands 80 leagues distant from the maine land, which the Spaniards, with a barbarous kind of people, they built a fort and a towne thereupon, from whence they have trade with the people of China . Unto these Islands they have foure great ships that usually trade, two of them continually going, and two comming: so thkes as the Portugals bring home out of the East Indies, the very same doe the Spaniards bring from these Islands and from China , for Mexico the chiefe citie of Nueva Espanna. The principall port-townes of the coast of Nueva Espanna are Guatulco, an
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The admirable and prosperous voyage of the Worshipfull Master Thomas Candish of Trimley in the Countie of Suffolke Esquire, into the South sea, and from thence round about the circumference of the whole earth, begun in the yeere of our Lord 1586, and finished 1588. Written by Master Francis Pretty lately of Ey in Suffolke, a Gentleman employed in the same action. (search)
om them, one Nicholas Roderigo a Portugall, who hath not onely bene in Canton and other parts of China , but also in the islands of Japon being a countrey most rich in silver mynes, and hath also ben and they have yeerely trafficke from Acapulco in Nueva Espanna, and also 20 or 30 shippes from China and from the Sanguelos, which bring them many sorts of marchandize. The marchants of China and China and the Sanguelos are part Moores and part heathen people. They bring great store of gold with them, which they trafficke and exchange for silver, and give waight for waight. These Sanguelos are men of mas done our Generall tolde him that hee and his company were Englishmen; and that wee had bene at China and had had trafique there with them, and that wee were come thither to discover, and purposed to would come unto them, they would warrant him to have all the Malucos at commandement, besides, China , Sangles, and the yles of the Philippinas, and that hee might be assured to have all the Indians
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Thomas Candish to the right honourable the Lord Hunsdon, Lord Chamberlaine, one of her Majesties most honourable Privy Councell, touching the successe of his voyage about the world. (search)
ooke at California , which ship came from the Philippinas, being one of the richest of merchandize that ever passed those seas, as the kings register and merchants accounts did shew: for it did amount in value to * in Mexico to be solde. Which goods (for that my ships were not able to conteine the least part of them) I was inforced to set on fire. From the cape of California , being the uttermost part of all Nueva Espanna, I navigated to the Islands of the Philippinas hard upon the coast of China ; of which countrey I have brought such intelligence as hath not bene heard of in these parts. The statelinesse and riches of which countrey I feare to make report of, least I should not be credited: for if I had not knowen sufficiently the incomparable wealth of that countrey, I should have bene as incredulous thereof, as others will be that have not had the like experience. I sailed along the Ilands of the Malucos, where among some of the heathen people I was well intreated, where our count
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certeine notes or references taken out of the large map of China , brought home by M. Thomas Candish 1588. (search)
Certeine notes or references taken out of the large map of China , brought home by M. Thomas Candish 1588.THE great kingdome of the Mogores is upon the Northwest, and falleth upon Tanassarin beyond Malaca , and joyneth upon Bengala: they are men of warre, and use no fight but on horsebacke: they go in their apparell like Portugals. 2 A city, wherein is captaine a Chinian, a man very deformed, having under him many men of warre: he maketh warre both against the Tartarians and the Mogores; lyingues broad, and hath great houses that doe pay tribute 1242135, and 339000 men of warre. 15 This lake lieth behinde Siam , and before Champa, and doth joyne with the Lappians, and from thence commeth all the water that serveth the kingdome of China : and the Indians & the Chinians doe report this lake to be the whole world, and so they paint the sea, the moone, and the starres within it. 16 The province of Cansay hath 13 cities, and a chiefe citie, and 73 townes and castles, and is 260 l
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The last voyage of the worshipfull M. Thomas Candish esquire, intended for the South sea, the Philippinas, and the coast of China , with 3. tall ships, and two barks: Written by M. John Jane, a man of good observation, imployed in the same, and many other voyages. (search)
The last voyage of the worshipfull M. Thomas Candish esquire, intended for the South sea, the Philippinas, and the coast of China , with 3. tall ships, and two barks: Written by M. John Jane, a man of good observation, imployed in the same, and many other voyages.THE 26. of August 1591, wee departed from Plimmouth with 3. tall ships, and two barkes, The Galeon wherein M. Candish went himselfe being Admiral, The Roebucke vice admirall whereof M. Cocke was Captaine, The Desire Rereadmirall whereof was Captaine M. John Davis (with whom and for whose sake I went this voyage) The Blacke pinnesse, and a barke of M. Adrian Gilbert, whereof M. Randolfe Cotton was Captaine. The 29. of November wee fell with the bay of Salvador upon the coast of Brasil 12. leagues on this side Cabo Frio, where wee were becalmed untill the second of December: at which time wee tooke a small barke bound for the River of Plate with sugar, haberdash wares, and Negros. The Master of this barke brought us unto an
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The letters of the Queenes most excellent Majestie sent in the yere 1596 unto the great Emperor of China by M. Richard Allot and M. Thomas Bromefield marchants of the citie of London, who were embarqued in a fleet of 3 ships, to wit, The Beare, The Beares whelpe, and the Benjamin; set forth principally at the charges of the honourable knight Sir Robert Duddely, and committed unto the command and conduct of M. Benjamin Wood, a man of approoved skill in navigation: who, together with his ships and company (because we have heard no certaine newes of them since the moneth of February next after their departure) we do suppose, may be arrived upon some part of the coast of China , and may there be stayed by the said Emperour, or perhaps may have some treacherie wrought against them by the Portugales of Macao, or the Spaniards of the Philippinas. (search)
man of approoved skill in navigation: who, together with his ships and company (because we have heard no certaine newes of them since the moneth of February next after their departure) we do suppose, may be arrived upon some part of the coast of China , and may there be stayed by the said Emperour, or perhaps may have some treacherie wrought against them by the Portugales of Macao, or the Spaniards of the Philippinas. ELIZABETH by the grace of God Queene of England , France, and Ireland , the most mightie defendresse of the true & christian faith against all that falsely professe the name of Christ &c. To the most high and soveraigne Prince the most puissant Governour of the great kingdome of China , the chiefest Emperour in those parts of Asia and of the Ilands adjoyning, and the great monarke of the orientall regions of the world; wisheth health, and many joyfull and happy yeeres, with all plenty and abundance of things most acceptable. Whereas our honest and faithfull subjects whi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
d I learned, on inquiry, that the fresh beef sent to the prison usually fell short from one thousand to twelve hundred pounds in each consignment. Of course when this happened many had to lose a large portion of their allowance; and sometimes it happened that the same man got bones only for several successive days. The expedients resorted to by the men to supply this want of animal food were disgusting. Many found an acceptable substitute in rats, with which the place abounded; and these Chinese delicacies commanded an average price of about four cents apiece — in greenbacks. I have seen scores of them in various states of preparation, and have been assured by those who indulged in them that worse things have been eaten — an estimate of their value that I took on trust. Others found in the barrels of refuse fat, which were accumulated at the cook-house, and in the pickings of the bones, which were cut out of the meat and thrown out in a dirty heap back of the kitchen, to be rem
secluded spot he was buried for three years. His chief business was to make a crop of Indian-corn, for bread for his family and forage for his work-animals; a crop of cotton, for the purchase of supplies; a small crop of sugar-cane; and an ample supply of all sorts of vegetables. To these ends he gave a good deal of hard labor in the field and garden, but he did not neglect the simple but delightful recreation of the flower-garden. His house was shaded by a grove of the fragrant pride of China, and the spacious yard contained towering live-oaks, pecans, and other beautiful native forest-trees. A hedge of Cherokee rose with its snowy bloom protected the inclosure; and an ample orchard of figs and peaches furnished its fruits for the table. When General Johnston went there, he was told leeks were the only vegetable that would thrive, but he soon proved that hardly any vegetable known to American gardens would fail under ordinary care. It is true that he was careful, patient, indu
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