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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaties. (search)
ies and conventions of the United States with other powers. Foreign Power and Object of Treaty.Where Concluded.Date. Algiers: Treaty of Peace and amityAlgiersSept. 5, 1795 Treaty of Peace and amityAlgiersJuly 6, 1815 Treaty of Peace and amityAlgiersSept. 5, 1795 Treaty of Peace and amityAlgiersJuly 6, 1815 Treaty of Peace and amityAlgiersDec. 24, 1816 Argentine Confederation: Treaty of Free navigation of Parana and UruguaySan JoseJuly 10, 1853 Treaty of Friendship, commerce, navigationSan JoseJuly 27, Austria: Treaty of Commerce, navigationWashingtonAug. 26, 1829 TreatAlgiersJuly 6, 1815 Treaty of Peace and amityAlgiersDec. 24, 1816 Argentine Confederation: Treaty of Free navigation of Parana and UruguaySan JoseJuly 10, 1853 Treaty of Friendship, commerce, navigationSan JoseJuly 27, Austria: Treaty of Commerce, navigationWashingtonAug. 26, 1829 Treaty of Commerce and navigationWashingtonMay 8, 1848 Convention of ExtraditionWashingtonJuly 3, 1856 Austria-Hungary: Convention of Rights of consulsWashingtonJuly 11, 1870 Convention of NaturalizationViennaSept. 20, 1870 Convention of Trade-marksAlgiersDec. 24, 1816 Argentine Confederation: Treaty of Free navigation of Parana and UruguaySan JoseJuly 10, 1853 Treaty of Friendship, commerce, navigationSan JoseJuly 27, Austria: Treaty of Commerce, navigationWashingtonAug. 26, 1829 Treaty of Commerce and navigationWashingtonMay 8, 1848 Convention of ExtraditionWashingtonJuly 3, 1856 Austria-Hungary: Convention of Rights of consulsWashingtonJuly 11, 1870 Convention of NaturalizationViennaSept. 20, 1870 Convention of Trade-marksViennaNov. 25, 1871 Baden: Convention of ExtraditionBerlinJan. 30, 1857 Treaty of NaturalizationCarlsruheJuly 19, 1868 Bavaria: Convention of Abolishing droit d'aubaine and taxes on emigrationBerlinJan. 21, 1845 Convention of ExtraditionLondon
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
le; they cede 25,000 square miles......Aug. 3, 1795 Washington signs the Jay treaty......Aug. 14, 1795 Treaty with Algiers to ransom prisoners taken by corsairs, and to pay annual tribute of $23,000 to the Dey......Sept. 5, 1795 Treaty withelphia to the new capital, Washington......July, 1800 Frigate George Washington, Capt. William Bainbridge, carries to Algiers the Dey's tribute-money, and is required to carry the Dey's ambassador to Constantinople......September, 1800 Envoys . Ripley.] Non-intercourse and non-importation acts repealed......March 3, 1815 United States declares war against Algiers......March 3, 1815 Thirteenth Congress adjourns......March 3, 1815 General Jackson, at New Orleans, is fined $1,0ards; five killed and thirty-three wounded, two mortally......April 6, 1815 Commodore Decatur sails from New York for Algiers with the frigates Guerriere, Macedonian, and Constellation, one sloop-of-war, four brigs, and two schooners......May 19,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
se......March 1, 1869 Crescent City Live-stock and Slaughter-house Company, a monopoly in New Orleans which excited opposition, and was finally declared unconstitutional and restrained by perpetual injunction, was created by the legislature and went into operation......June 1, 1869 Legislature grants to the New Orleans, Mobile, and Chattanooga Railway Company $3,000,000 in 8-per-cent. State bonds, payable in four instalments......Feb. 21, 1870 Legislature unites Jefferson City and Algiers with New Orleans under one charter......1870 George M. Wickliffe, State auditor, impeached and convicted of extortion and fraud......March 3, 1870 A political contest between two factions of the Republican party. The State central committee — S. B. Packard, United States marshal at the head—call a convention to choose a State committee. The opposition, under Lieut.-Gov. Oscar J. Dunn (colored), meet in the custom-house. Governor Warmouth and P. B. S. Pinchback (colored) are refused
front of the city was no longer a great mart of commerce, piled with cotton bales, and supplies going back to the planter; densely packed with steamers, and thronged with a busy multitude. The long lines of shipping above the city had been greatly thinned, and a general air of desolation hung over the river front. It seemed as though a pestilence brooded over the doomed city, and that its inhabitants had fled before the fell destroyer. The Sumter lay on the opposite side of the river, at Algiers, and I crossed over every morning to superintend her refitment. I was sometimes detained at the ferry-house, waiting for the ferry-boat, and on these occasions, casting my eyes up and down the late busy river, it was not unfrequent to see it without so much as a skiff in motion on its bosom. But this first simoon of the desert which had swept over the city, as a foretaste of what was to come, had by no means discouraged its patriotic inhabitants. The activity of commerce had ceased, it
e cutter, and asked for the order of the Collector bringing her to New Orleans. The original was placed in my possession, of which the following is a copy. And here it may be proper to observe, that the order is written and signed by the Collector himself: Custom House, New Orleans, Collector's office, Jan. 15, 1861. Sir: You are hereby directed to proceed forthwith under sail to this city, and anchor the vessel under your command opposite the United States Marine Hospital, above Algiers. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, F. H. Hatch, Collector. To Captain J. G. Breshwood, United States Revenue Cutter McClelland, Southwest Pass, La. Defeated at New Orleans, Mr. Jones then took his way to Mobile, to look after the Lewis Cass. Her Captain (Morrison) could not be found, but Mr. Jones discovered in the cabin the following letter, which explains the surrender of that vessel: State of Alabama, Collector's office, Mobile, January 30, 1861. Sir: In obedien
ington Artillery were under the command of Capt. Harry Isaacson, and the infantry companies under Capt. Voorhies--all under command of Major J. B. Walton. The Continental Guards, Louisiana Grays, Chalmette Guards, Calhoun Guards, Sarsfield Rifles, De Soto Rifles, Delta Rifles, Southern Cadets, Second Company of Orleans Cadets, Bienville Rifles, and other companies, constituted the infantry of this brigade. The Bienville Guards, Bienville Rifles, and a splendid looking body of men from Algiers, (whose title we did not learn,) appeared in citizen's dress, their uniforms being not yet ready, though they had their guns, and they were none the less admirable for want of their uniforms. The Orleans Artillery battalion had eight brass pieces, each piece attended by a detachment, and the rest of the battalion marching as infantry. These and the Orleans Guard battallion, were the largest and the most splendid feature of the turn-out. The Orleans Guard turned out no less than 527 mus
weapon is very questionable. It is believed that this form of bayonet was first introduced in the French service among the Chasseurs de Vincennes, who used it in Algiers, in the Crimean campaign of 1854-55, and the Italian war of 1859. Bayonets. It is secured to the rifle by a ring in the guard and a spring-catch in the hilto maintain the concrete in place until set. This is an old Roman method, and was described by Vitruvius. It has also been used by the French in their works in Algiers. Blocks of 324 cubic feet were floated out and dropped from slings into their places. English recipe:— Puzzuolana12 Quicklime9 Sand 6 Stone spalls9 Iron h one or more mortars are mounted for naval bombardments. Mortar-vessels are said to have been invented by Reyneau, and to have been first used at the siege of Algiers in 1682. Bomb-lance. Bomb-lance. A harpoon which carries a charge of explosive material in its head. In the example, the head is charged with powder, an
Cami-on. A heavy dray for the transportation of ordnance. Camlet. (Fabric.) A cloak-stuff formerly made of camel's hair, alone or mixed with silk; since made of wool and silk or wool and flax. It was a fashionable cloak stuff in the days of our fathers and their fathers. It was rigid from close weaving, and nearly waterproof. It went out when indiarubber fabrics came in. Campanile. Cam-wheels. Cam harvester-wheel. Camel's-hair cloth is used for tent coverings in Algiers by the Kabyles and Berbers; in China for carpets; in Turkey for soldiers' coverlets; in Circassia for dreadnaught cloaks. Fine or coarse, its uses are great and various. Marco Polo refers to this manufacture at the city of Kalaka, in the province of Tangut, in the domain of the great Genghis Khan. After dinner, I put on my new camelott suit; the best I ever wore in my life, the suit costing me above £ 24 (Pepys's Diary, 1665). This was a rich silk. This night my new camelott riding
gue14.1 Cracow13.3 Brussels28.06 Paris22.64 Geneva31.07 Milan38.01 Rome30.86 Naples29.64 Marseilles23.4 Lisbon27.1 Coimbra Port118.8 Bordeaux34.00 Algiers36.99 St Petersburg17.3 Simpheropol, Crimea14.83 Kutais (E shore of Black Sea)59.44 Bakou (S of Caspian)13.38 Ekatherinburg, Ural Mts.14.76 Barnaoul, Siberiatherefor. In the summer of 1855, at a competitive trial of reapers about 40 miles from Paris, France, three machines were exhibited, from America, England, and Algiers. The following was the result in a field of oats:— The American machine cut an acre in22 minutes. The English machine cut an acre in66 minutes. The Algerianneous acid from wood-tar. RosinPinus palustris, etcNorth America, etcThe residue left after the distillation of oil of turpentine SandarachCallitris quadrivalvisAlgiersUsed in varnishes. When powdered, affords pounce. Incense. ScammonyConvolvus scammoniaAsia MinorUsed as a purgative in medicine. Shellac(See Lac.) StoraxStyra
r being mixed with water. Ordinary concrete and Beton (which see) are of this class. Terra-cotta, employed for architectural ornaments, statuary, etc., is in the nature of a fine brick. Cement stones have been largely employed for constructions in the sea, especially for harbor dams, breakwaters, and quay walling. We may cite the moles of Dover and Alderney, in England, of Port Vendre, Cette, La Ciotat, Marseilles, and Cherbourg in France, Carthagena in Spain, Pola in the Adriatic, of Algiers and Port Said in Africa, and Cape Henlopen at the mouth of the Delaware. For the break water at Cherbourg artificial stone blocks of 712 cubic feet each were immersed The fortifications before Copenhagen are made of a concrete of broken stone and hydraulic mortar. The sluice of Francis Joseph on the Danube, in Hungary, is built entirely of concrete. This work forms a reservoir, the bottom and the sides of which consist of one piece. Its length is 360 feet, and width 30 feet. Its cons
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