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way to enlist soldiers, P. 81; of Quaker proclivities, P. 83; a rebel fragment concerning his cabinet, P. 83; see Abe's Saturday. P. 96; compared with Jeff. Davis, P. 128; his foreign relations in the confederate army, P. 42, 131 Lindsay, John, the first citizen of Independent Virginia, P, 99 Littell, J. S., letter of Gov. R. K. Call, of Florida. to, Doc. 416 Little Bethel, Va., battle of, D. 98 Little Rhody, P. 87 Little Rock, Ark., arsenal at, D. 17 Liverpool, Eng., rebel flag in, P. 114 Liverpool Times, article on United States, D. 38; on affairs in America, Doc. 132 London News, protest of. against The recognition of a Southern confederacy, D. 19; Doc. 41; article in the., defining the positions of the United States and the Southern Confederacy, D. 66; article from, on the war tn America, D. 85; Doc. 311 London Times, article on the disunion movement, D. 16; Doc. 25; Russell, the correspondent of, D. 87 Loomis, A. W., D.
Doc. 26.-the Sumter at sea: the Captains she captured. Liverpool, Eng., February 4, 1862. On Sunday night last, the Spanish steamer Duero arrived in Liverpool from Cadiz, having as passengers on board three gentlemen, late in command of different American ships, all of which had been captured by the Confederate steamer Sumter, and burned at sea. The captains are Minott, late of the Vigilant, Smith, of the Arcade, and Hoxie, of the Eben Dodge. They were the prisoners of Capt. Semmes,Liverpool from Cadiz, having as passengers on board three gentlemen, late in command of different American ships, all of which had been captured by the Confederate steamer Sumter, and burned at sea. The captains are Minott, late of the Vigilant, Smith, of the Arcade, and Hoxie, of the Eben Dodge. They were the prisoners of Capt. Semmes, who, when the Sumter visited Cadiz recently, put them on shore there, whence they have been forwarded to this port by the American Consul there, and hence they propose returning to America by the Canadian steamer Bohemian. They describe the Sumter as a very indifferent screw propeller of about five hundred tons. She is armed with four short thirty — two--pounder guns and one sixty — eight-pounder pivot-gun. She is amply provided with small arms, has abundance of ammunition, and abundance of
The London papers of the twenty-ninth of January published the following monster hoax, under the heading Rumored Confederate victory at Port Royal : The Asia has brought intelligence from New-York of a battle having been fought on the twelfth of January on the main land, in the vicinity of Port Royal, between Gen. Lee's forces and the Federal troops, resulting in the total defeat of the latter, with a loss of one thousand seven hundred killed and wounded. The Washington Government, we are informed, had taken steps to suppress the news of this reverse, which, nevertheless, has reached a highly respectable party in Liverpool, through a private channel.
The Southern States of America.--The representative of a Liverpool house has engaged a number of engravers, lithographers, and copper-plate printers, to proceed to the Southern States of America. They have been engaged for three years, and are to receive each from three to six pounds per week. So secret was the whole affair managed, that none of them knew how they were to be conveyed to their destination, nor what particular business they were to carry out, nor who were the real employers. All they were informed was that they were to be ready to start on Friday night last, and that a certain firm in Liverpool would guarantee their wages and expenses, they having power to break the bargain at the end of any of the years. Is is surmised that they are to be employed in a confederate states government printing-office, to print paper-money. North-British Mail, Feb. 1862.
For Liverpool direct. the A 2 very fast steamer Nashville, two thousand one hundred tons burthen, Pegram master, having been thoroughly repaired and put in complete running order, has commenced her regular trips between Beaufort, N. C., and Liverpool, Eng. For freight or passage apply to the Captain on board, or to Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Washington, D. C., April 1, 1862. --Boston Traveller, April 1.
lone were to be driven out. After an explanation of this sort, many withdrew their applications. The Sixth Connecticut regiment, and Eighth Maine, to-day left Beaufort, to relieve the negro regiments at Jacksonville, and will hold that place while Colonel Higginson presses on further into the heart of the State. You have already been informed of the capture of a rebel naval officer named Beville, by his own men, who deserted while on picket-duty, and brought him off with them. Yesterday, a flag of truce was sent down from Savannah, with a package of clothing and one hundred dollars in gold, to meet Beville's necessities, and a draft for two hundred and fifty dollars more, upon Mr. Washington Durbrow, of Hanover street, New-York, made payable to him in Liverpool, was also forwarded for the same purpose. I understand that an effort will be made to exchange Beville for Lieut. Rush, the signal-officer who was captured by the rebels last week, from Spanish Wells Station. J. H. W.
g copy of despatch no. 302 of the United States Consul at Liverpool. Department of State, Washington, July 6, 1864. swith, a despatch, No. 302, of the United States Consul at Liverpool, announcing the destruction of the pirate Alabama by the s, Secretary of the Navy. Despatch of U. S. Consul at Liverpool. No. 302.] United States Consulate, Liverpool, July 2Liverpool, July 21, 1864. sir: The pirate Alabama has at last met the fate she deserves. She was sunk by the United States steamer Kearsarg last, after a fight of one hour. We only have, here at Liverpool, the confederate account of the action. I send you slips cut from the London Times, Liverpool Courier, Daily Post, and Mercury of to-day, giving all that is known about it. . . . service, or be less decisive than the last Sunday's. Liverpool courier account. When the meagre telegrams from Cherbo rumor without the slightest foundation in fact. Indeed, Liverpool people were very reluctant to give credence to the report
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.6 (search)
Finally, another aunt came to visit us from Liverpool; and, therewith, the first phase of my futurAs the little packet-steamer bore us towards Liverpool, and the shores of Wales receded from view, rehend what this sight could mean. Was this Liverpool, this monstrous aggregation of buildings, an I could answer the question satisfactorily, Liverpool was all around me: it had grown, unperceivedscommon Street. My precious box, with its Liverpool outfit, was carried into the house, and a seittle more than tramp through the streets of Liverpool from Everton to the Docks, with Teddy Morris that, had a later comer questioned me about Liverpool, I should doubtless have expressed the convid he would cite numerous instances of men in Liverpool, who, beginning at the lowest step, had risese and similar questions. There were real Liverpool boys about me, who were not unwilling to imp go. There is no chance of doing anything in Liverpool ; and, though he was not of a yielding dispo[5 more...]
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.7 (search)
ung regarded the fiery mate from the corners of their eyes. Five days from Liverpool there suddenly appeared on deck three stowaways,--two Irish boys of about fousmile that he had been least hurt. Harry expressed his opinion that he was a Liverpool rat, who would certainly end his days in the State's prison. Curiously enover having chosen the Windermere to escape from the miseries inseparable from Liverpool poverty. Before many minutes Nelson was dancing about me, and wounding me inst have appeared like a starry sky to him. Labouring under the notion that Liverpool sailors needed the most ferocious discipline, our two mates seldom omitted a ians at sea, and sweet as molasses near port. On the fifty-second day from Liverpool, the Windermere anchored off one of the four mouths of the Mississippi River,ity and independence that made each face so different from what I had seen in Liverpool. These people knew no master, and had no more awe of their employers than th
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.8 (search)
you hail from? You are not an American. I came from Liverpool, sir, less than a week ago, by a packet-ship. I shipped for their variety of produce, and that no city, not even Liverpool, could exhibit such mercantile enterprise, or such a smarde me weep on leaving St. Asaph, Ffynnon Beuno, Brynford, Liverpool, and even the Windermere, made me cling to my attic room n finding that the boy was English, and just arrived from Liverpool, I assented to her arrangement. My intended bed-fellowhimself Dick Heaton, and described himself as having left Liverpool in the ship Pocahontas, as a cabin-boy. He also had been he said that it was a finer sight than even the docks of Liverpool. After a cup of coffee and some sugared waffles, we proc told me was as follows: She had been born at Everton, Liverpool, and, since she had begun to walk, she had lived with a sing as of a nightmare on me. My unhappy experiences at Liverpool had not been without their lessons of prudence. My only
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