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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 10: forecast (search)
e thing the larger public is likely to do. It is a fortunate fact that popular judgment, even at the time, is apt to fix upon some one poem by each poet, for instance, and connect the author with that poem inseparably thenceforward. Fate appears to assign to each some one boat, however small, on which his fame may float down towards immortality, even if it never attains it. This is the case, for instance, with Longfellow's Hiawatha, Lowell's Commemoration Ode, Holmes's Chambered Nautilus, Whittier's Snow-bound, Mrs. Howe's Battle Hymn, Whitman's My Captain, Aldrich's Fredericksburg sonnet, Helen Jackson's Spinning, Thoreau's Smoke, Bayard Taylor's Song of the Camp, Emerson's Daughters of time, Burroughs's Serene I Fold my hands, Piatt's The morning Street, Mrs. Hooper's I slept and dreamed that life was beauty, Stedman's Thou art mine, Thou hast given thy word, Wasson's All's well, Brownlee Brown's Thalatta, Ellery Channing's To-morrow, Harriet Spofford's In a summer evening, Lanier'
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
te only (1871) ; As strong as a bird on Pinions free (1872) ; Specimen days, and collect (1883); November Boughs (1888) ; Sands at seventy (1888) ; and a collective edition entitled Complete poems and prose (1889). Died Mar. 26, 1892. Whittier, John Greenleaf Born in Haverhill, Mass., Dec. 17, 1807. The Quaker poet had slender means, and by shoe-making and a term of school teaching earned money to attend the Haverhill Academy for two terms. At the age nineteen he had contributed verse anonymously to the Free press, edited by W. L. Garrison, who encouraged the poet and became his life-long friend. Later, Whittier edited the American Manufacturer, the Haverhill Gazette, and the Hartford, Conn., New England weekly Review, also contributing to John Neal's magazine, The Yankee, and afterward editing the Pennsylvania Freeman. He at first contributed most of his literary work to the National era of Washington, D. C., an important anti-slavery paper, but after the establishment of t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
ott (London), 1887. S. T. Pickard's Life and letters of John Greenleaf Whittier, 2 vols., Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1894. T. W. Higginson's Whittier, in English men of letters series, 1901. J. T. Morse's Life and letters of Oliver Wendell Holmes, 2 vols., Houghton, Mifflin &n & Co., are the authorized publishers of the works of Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes, Lowell, Hawthorne, Emerson, and Thoreau. The standard. W. E. Channing's Discourses, reviews, and Miscellanies. 1831. Whittier's Legends of New England. 1833. Poe's Ms. Found in a Bottle. 1849. George Ticknor's History of Spanish literature. 1849. Whittier's Voices of freedom. 1850. Hawthorne's Scarlet letter. 1850.sination of Lincoln. 1865. Lowell's Commemoration Ode. 1866. Whittier's Snow-bound. 1866. Howells's Venetian days. 1868. E. E. Hal85. Howells's Rise of Silas Lapham. 1891. Lowell died. 1892. Whittier and Whitman died. 1893. World's Fair at Chicago. 1894. Holme
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
iam, 187. Autocrat of the breakfast table, Holmes's, 157, 158. Bancroft, George, 87, 111, 117, 143. Barclay of Ury, Whittier's, 147. Barlow, Joel, 38. Battle of the Kegs, Hopkinson's, 55. Baudelaire, 208. Beauclerc, Lady, Diana, 168. ark Twain, 236, 245, 246-247. Marmion, Scott's, 37. Marshes of Glynn, Lanier's, 264. Massachusetts to Virginia, Whittier's, 152. Masson, David, 165. Mather, Cotton, 12, 15, 18-20, 269. Merry wives of Windsor, 1. .Metamonphoses, Ovid's, 90, 103. Sky Walk, Brown's, 70. Smith, Capt., John, 7. Smith, Joseph, 69. Smoke, Thoreau's, 264. Snow-bound, Whittier's, 264. Society of Friends, 146. Song of the broad-axe, Whitman's, 229. Southey, Robert, 258. Sparkling and BrigWhite, Blanco, 263. White, Maria, 161. Whitman, Walt, 220, 221, 223, 227-234, 264. Whittier, Elizabeth, 240. Whittier, John Greenleaf, 128, 136, 137, 145-153, 197, 264. Whittier, Thomas, 147. Wieland, Brown's, 70. Wigglesworth, Michael, 14,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 13: Whittier (search)
England and made a home for himself on the shores of the Merrimac River. The substantial oak farmhouse which, late in life, he erected for his large family near Haverhill, is still standing. Descended from him in the fourth generation, John Greenleaf Whittier, the poet, was born in this house, 17 December, 1807. This is the homestead described with minute and loving fidelity in Snow-Bound, and it is typical of the many thousands of its sort that dotted the New England country-side, rearing in the old Puritan tradition a sturdy pioneer stock that was to blossom later in the fine flower of political and ethical passion, of statesmanship and oratory and letters. Though Whittier's family tree was originally Puritan, a Quaker scion was grafted upon it in the second American generation, when Joseph Whittier, the youngest son of the pioneer, married Mary Peaslee, whose father had been an associate and disciple of George Fox. The descendants in this line remained faithful to the doctrines
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
orth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell, N. P. Willis, Fitz-Greene Halleck, Donald Grant Mitchell, George H. Boker, Bayard Taylor, T. W. Parsons, Epes Sargent, J. G. Saxe, James T. Fields, Charles Godfrey Leland, George William Curtis, Park Benjamin, Rufus W. Griswold, Richard Henry Stoddard, C. F. Briggs, and many more; and among other contributors of the early time were Miss Sedgwick, James Gates Percival, Richard Henry Wilde, Mrs. Sigourney, William Gilmore Simms, J. G. Whittier, Horace Greeley, and James Fenimore Cooper. The importance of The Knickerbocker magazine may be judged by this list of names; yet in dignity of tone and especially in the quality of its humour it was somewhat below the standard of several of its successors. New York, like Boston, saw many ambitious attempts at literary periodicals. Only the special student of bibliography and literary biography will follow in detail the amalgamations and kaleidoscopic changes of such ventures as The
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
had sent forth volumes of verse; the latest to appear (in 1888) was aptly entitled Before the Curfew,—as Longfellow had called his final volume In the Harbor and Whittier had felicitously styled his last book At Sundown. On 7 October, 1894, Holmes died at the ripe age of eighty-five, unusual even among the long-lived American po and amenity, its lack of all acerbity or acridity, its total freedom from the rennet of meanness which curdles the milk of human kindness. In a letter which Whittier wrote for a celebration of Holmes's seventy-fifth birthday, the Quaker poet singled out for praise the Boston bard's genial nature, entire freedom from jealousy type from the major poets, the sport of their frolicsome moods, and no adequate anthology would fail to include Bryant's Robert of Lincoln, Emerson's Humble-Bee, Whittier's In School days and Longfellow's Catawba wine. From Lowell the examples would be half a dozen at least, with Auf Wiedersehen and Without and within as the fir
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 24: Lowell (search)
se has that obvious unity of effect which characterizes the work of so many nineteenth century writers. His work does not recall, even in the minds of its admirers, a group of impressions so distinct and fixed as those summoned by the poetry of Whittier, Poe, or Whitman, or by that of Swinburne, Morris, or Browning, or by the prose of Thoreau or Emerson, of Ruskin or Arnold. His work, indeed, does not have the marks of a dominant or of a peculiar personality; nor does it add to literature a nering the first twenty years of Lowell's life, American literature had taken a bulk and character which might risk comparison with the literature of any European nation during that period. In his teens he was reading Emerson, Longfellow, Holmes, Whittier, Hawthorne, and Prescott, and most of these men were his neighbours and ready to welcome and direct his first attempts at letters. There is a sense of an intellectual and imaginative dawn to be found in Lowell's essays and verse, a dawn that is
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
ons and felt pulses throbbing beneath the rude exterior of American life. Of such were Lowell, Whittier, Whitman, and various more ephemeral writers who felt the stirring times. To them it was not sThe Biglow papers, confirming his right to be called the great American satirist in verse; and Whittier, See also Book II, Chap. XIII. already, like Lowell, no uncertain voice speaking against sln in How old Brown took Harper's Ferry, Brownell in The battle of Charlestown, fiercely ironic, Whittier in Brown of Ossawatomie, and, above all, the anonymous author (he may have been Charles Spragueia loyal. The advance of Lee to Antietam, his repulse there, and his retreat found a record in Whittier's Barbara Frietchie, Melville's The Victor of Antietam, Boker's The crossing at Fredericksburg,ly be matched for pungency and pregnancy of matter by any other American poem for an occasion. Whittier, who had already hailed Fremont's action in freeing the slaves of secessionists in Missouri in
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
my literary craft—I will win my bread and water; by my poems I will live or I will starve. In 1872 he brought out a volume of Legends and lyrics; in 1875 The Mountain of the lovers and other poems; and in 1882, a complete edition of his poems. Two or three of his best poems were written in his last years, notably A Little While I Fain Would Linger Yet, and In Harbor. While Hayne did not strike a deeply original note, he cultivated faithfully the talents with which he was endowed. His best poems are characterized by delicacy of feeling, conscientious workmanship, and a certain assimilation of the best qualities of other poets. His magnanimous spirit after the war, as revealed in his tributes to Whittier and Longfellow, his revelation of the picturesqueness of the Southern landscapes and especially of the pine forests of Georgia, are the substantial features of his poetry. As a connecting link between Simms and Lanier he has a permanent place in the literary history of the South
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