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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 59. battles of Spottsylvania, Va: battle of Sunday, May 8, 1864. (search)
lled and new lines were formed, to which was added that of the Sixth corps; General Wright's division, if I remember correctly, forming on the right, and the remaininart of the previous night Hancock's corps advanced, connecting on the left with Wright's division of the Sixth corps, which connected in turn with Warren, pushing hisas advanced and strengthened, from time to time, without a general battle. General Wright's division of the Sixth corps, posted Sunday on Warren's right, was now movrom the right and sent out on the left of the Sixth corps (now commanded by General Wright) to take and hold a strong position thus weakened. Fighting began in the ebattles up to that night, had lost over five thousand killed arid wounded. General Wright s old division, now commanded by General Russell, had lost nearly one thouswn from the right, joined Ewell and threw his divisions into the struggle. General Wright moved up from the right, supporting Hancock, to meet the surge. Longstreet
ith a portion of their commands, were in Martinsburg. General Wright with the Sixth corps, and General Emory with the Ninet West Virginia army were place under the command of Major-General Wright, then at Poolesville. By this order General Huntersferring the West Virginia troops to the command of Major-General Wright was only intended to be temporary in its effect, anto Winchester, his main body lying around Berryville. General Wright followed him as far as the gap. On the eighteenth Gene from Berryville toward Front Royal and Strasburg, and General Wright, with the Sixth and Nineteenth corps, returned to Washthe utmost could hardly be supposed; the withdrawal of General Wright's forces without a decisive action was therefore regresident was received, asking if, since the departure of General Wright, General Hunter had force enough to hold the enemy, sh canal, and menacing both Cumberland and Chambersburg; General Wright at Monocacy, with the Sixth corps, and General Emory c
the enemy's strong rear guard by Burnside and Wright, which was handsomely done. From all present n breaking his skirmish line in one place; but Wright opened a heavy artillery fire upon them, whichvelop our actual force left. During the night Wright withdrew; Hill did the same, and the works of e casualties are said to be very numerous, and Wright has taken a large number of prisoners. TheIn this situation, our right, the Sixth corps (Wright), fell back near Hanover Court-house; our leftSheridan was compelled to await the arrival of Wright and Smith, then on their way up. While write of his point of starting, was the utmost General Wright could possibly do. Operations along therlow's and Gibbon's divisions, and the left of Wright's corps. It was these very troops that in the barely regained the position lost yesterday. Wright found nothing before him but pickets. He advaant of his culture. Yesterday afternoon General Wright, with the Sixth corps, made a movement to [23 more...]
Motley House, May 22. The headquarters of the Ninth corps were established here at daylight. The corps is about leaving, and will proceed to-day to Bethel Church, seven miles beyond. The Sixth corps is now passing down the road in the direction taken by the Fifth corps last evening. The affair last night, indicated by the cannonading, was the holding in check of the enemy's strong rear guard by Burnside and Wright, which was handsomely done. From all present indications we will have no battle this side of the line of the North Anna river.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25-- (search)
s still held by such portions of our front as the corps of Burnside (Ninth) and Wright (Sixth) covered. At four P. M. of Saturday, Burnside, who held position on the fancying that the Sixth also was retiring, left the works, came up directly in Wright's front and attacked. They succeeded in breaking his skirmish line in one place; but Wright opened a heavy artillery fire upon them, which checked their advance. Hill committed an error in making the attack in front, for had he crossed the rivuncovered by the withdrawal of Warren, and would have had an enfilading fire on Wright, which it would have been difficult to withstand. In addition to this the assaas probably designed simply to develop our actual force left. During the night Wright withdrew; Hill did the same, and the works of Spottsylvania ceased to be the obe point d'appui for both flanks. Early yesterday the whole of the Sixth corps (Wright's) filed over at this point, took position in rear of the Fifth, and a portion
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, in the field, near Hanovertown, Va. Tuesday, May 31. (search)
of the Bucktails, who captured the battle-flag of the Fifteenth Georgia, at Gettysburg, was wounded and made prisoner. When the attack was made upon Warren, Hancock was ordered, at eight o'clock last evening, to make a diversion in his favor. The order was vigorously executed; and after a couple of hours' of heavy cannonade was kept up on the rebel position by several batteries and six mortars, this morning finds our line in much the same formation as it had yesterday. The Sixth corps (Wright's) holds the right, then the Second (Hancock's); the Fifth (Warren's); and then the Ninth (Burnside's), which holds our left. The only portion of our force thus far, engaged to-day, is Hancock's corps, from whose front I have just returned. The divisions of Birney on the right, and Barlow on the centre, advanced about six hundred yards, carrying the enemy's first line, which was held by a strong skirmish force. Birney captured forty prisoners, who proved to belong to Breckinridge's comm
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Army of the Potomac, June 1--P. M. (search)
d then strike with the rapidity of lightning! Evening.--A desperate fight took place this afternoon near Cold Harbor. Wright has been heard from. He formed a junction with Smith at Cold Harbor, when both corps attacked the enemy's right. The battle commenced at five P. M. and continued until after dark. Wright is said to have captured and held the enemy's advanced works, but Smith was not so fortunate. His men fought with great spirit, and captured a line of rifle-pits on the enemy's froseveral attempts to force a general engagement, but did not succeed. Each of the above corps was attacked in turn, while Wright was fighting on the left, but each attack was successfully repulsed. The enemy is not driven from his position on our lelly repulsed. The enemy is not driven from his position on our left. He yet holds his strongest works, and I think he will prove very troublesome there. The casualties are said to be very numerous, and Wright has taken a large number of prisoners.
Monday, June 6--8 A. M. No battle yesterday, but constant firing across from one line of works to the other as soon as any portion of a man's body could be seen. The casualties during the day, all from sharp-shooters and intermittent artillery, are not less than four hundred. To these must be added between one hundred and two hundred during the night. A little after eight o'clock a furious blast rang a fierce, discordant metre from the left, where lay Hancock's corps. Judging by the powder burned, it was more than a usually desperate night assault. Soon the following despatch is received: Half-past 8 O'clock, P. M.--They at first attacked Wright, but are now rushing down upon me. Apparently no damage. Hancock.
s way up to Goldsboroa. Yet such judicious use was made of these, and such industry displayed in the railroad management by Generals Easton and Beckwith, and Colonel Wright and Mr. Van Dyne, that by the tenth of April our men were all reclad, the wagons reloaded, and a fair amount of forage accumulated ahead. In the meantime Mthe seventeenth at noon, provided the position of the troops remained statu quo. I was both willing and anxious thus to consume a few days, as it would enable Colonel Wright to finish our railroad to Raleigh. Two bridges had to be built and twelve miles of new road made. We had no iron except by taking up that on the branch frneral Sherman. (See his General Orders No. 1). Four days later, April twenty-sixth, he reports to the Secretary that he has ordered Generals Meade, Sheridan, and Wright, to invade that part of North Carolina which was occupied by my command, and pay no regard to any truce or orders of mine. They were ordered to push forward, reg
Forks, orders were sent to Generals Parke and Wright to open their batteries and press the enemy's successful. On the second of April, Major-General Wright attacked at four A. M., carrying everyteting the head of the Twenty-fourth corps, General Wright retraced his steps and advanced on the Boyks immediately around the city. Major-General Wright deployed his corps confronting their works, inwith the enemy posted on Sailor's creek.Major-General Wright attacked with two divisions, and complethe position of Humphreys, orders were sent to Wright to cross and attack in support. By great exere. As soon as the road was in our possession, Wright was directed to push General Seymour on, the elellan and Lieutenant-Colonel Franklin, of General Wright's staff, had successively been sent forwarrps in coming up, and on the arrival of Major-General Wright he reported his corps to me, and from tr, and General Meade had communicated with General Wright, the latter declined to make his report to[7 more...]
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