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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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ng our men may be employed in harbor, or upon the Bank. If you send ships to fish on the Bank, and expect them not to return again to the plantation, &c. By this it appears that those vessels which had caught a cargo of fish on the Bank were expected to take them thence to London. Sept. 3, 1635, the General Court chose a committee of six for setting forward and managing a fishing trade. That fishing was profitable, we have the following early record: Thirty-five ships sailed this year (1622) from the west of England, and two from London, to fish on the New England coasts; and made profitable voyages. Through the instrumentality of our fishing interest, the General Court passed the following order. May 22, 1639: For further encouragement of men to set upon fishing, it is ordered, that such ships and vessels and other stock as shall be properly employed and adventured in taking, making, and transporting of fish according to the course of fishing voyages, and the fish itself, sha
May 16th, 1636 AD (search for this): chapter 11
River, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. There is a tradition that it was built on the north shore of the river, and therefore within the limits of Medford. The record concerning it is as follows: July 4, 1631. The governor built a bark at Mistick, which was launched this day, and called the blessing of the Bay. Aug. 9, the same year, the governor's bark, being of thirty tons, went to sea. It cost one hundred and forty-five pounds. The owner said of it, May 16, 1636, I will sell her for one hundred and sixty pounds. There was something singularly prophetic in the fact that the first vessel built at Mistick should have so increased in price after five years of service. Our day has seen the prophecy fulfilled; as it is no marvel now for a Medford ship to command a higher price after having had a fair trial at sea. The second year (1632) witnessed another vessel built by Mr. Cradock on the bank of the Mystic, whose register was a hundred tons. I
May, 1793 AD (search for this): chapter 11
d from a legislature, with tolls regulated by law. The enterprising citizens of Medford were among the first movers of the project, and the steadiest helpers of the work. It contributed so much to the wealth of our town, by inducing ship-builders to settle and work among us, that a notice of it belongs to our records. I find the following statistics in an Historical Sketch of the Middlesex Canal, gathered by their faithful agent, Caleb Eddy, Esq., and dated 1843:-- In the month of May, 1793, a number of gentlemen associated for opening a canal from the waters of the Merrimac, by Concord River, or in some other way, through the waters of Mystic River, to the town of Boston. There were present at this meeting the Hon. James Sullivan, Benjamin Hall, Willis Hall, Ebenezer Hall, Jonathan Porter, Loammi Baldwin, Ebenezer Hall, jun., Andrew Hall, and Samuel Swan, Esq. After organizing, by the choice of Benjamin Hall as chairman, and Samuel Swan as clerk, the Hon. James Sullivan,
June 22nd, 1793 AD (search for this): chapter 11
ice of Benjamin Hall as chairman, and Samuel Swan as clerk, the Hon. James Sullivan, Loammi Baldwin, and Captain Ebenezer Hall, were chosen a committee to attend the General Court, in order to obtain an act of incorporation, with suitable powers relating to the premises. In conformity with this vote, a petition was presented to the General Court, and a charter obtained ( incorporating James Sullivan, Esq., and others, by the name of the Proprietors of the Middlesex Canal ), bearing date June 22, 1793; and on the same day was signed by his excellency John Hancock, Governor of the Commonwealth. By this charter, the proprietors were authorized to lay assessments, from time to time, as might be required for the construction of said canal. At the first meeting of the proprietors, after the choice of James Sullivan as moderator, and Samuel Swan as clerk, the following votes were passed; viz., That the Hon. James Sullivan, Hon. James Winthrop, and Christopher Gore, Esq., be a comm
June 17th, 1775 AD (search for this): chapter 11
by his genius and fidelity. Mr. George Bryant Lapham was among the earliest comers connected with ship-building here. By patient industry, sound judgment, and unobtrusive merit, he won confidence, and commanded respect. Of others we should be glad to speak, did our limits allow. Of the pioneer in this eventful movement of ship-building, we may take the liberty of stating a few facts, as they belong to the history of the town. Thatcher Magoun, Esq., was born in Pembroke, Mass., June 17, 1775,--that red-letter day in Freedom's calendar. He early chose the trade of a ship-carpenter, and served his time with Mr. Enos Briggs, at Salem, where he worked five years. He was fond of being in the mould-room, and soon showed good reasons for his predilection. From Salem, he went to Mr. Barker's yard, in Charlestown (the present Navy Yard), where he worked and studied two years, and assisted in modelling. There he made the model of the first vessel he built, which was the Mount Aetna
g, if none can be found elsewhere. Col. Baldwin Lade a lengthy and able report on the twelfth day of May, 1794. Among other things, he says he has engaged Mr. Weston to make the survey of the route in the month of June, and closes his report as follows: I consider the prospects before us, in this undertaking, much more flattering in respect to the execution of the work, ill proportion to the extent, than any I have seen in tile Southern States, tile Washington Canal excepted. About the 15th of July, Mr. Weston arrived; and a committee, consisting of Loammi Baldwin and Samuel Jaques, was appointed to attend him during his survey and observations relating to the canal. The survey was completed, and a full report made by Mr. Weston, on the second day of August, 1794. Agents were immediately appointed to carry on the work, to commence at Billerica Mills, on Concord River, and first complete the level to the Merrimac, at North Chelmsford. The season having so far advanced, but little
July 4th, 1631 AD (search for this): chapter 11
nth, he makes the following record: Went up Mistick River about six miles. To this heroic and Christian adventurer belongs the honor of building the first vessel whose keel was laid in this part of the Western World; and that vessel was built on the bank of Mystic River, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. There is a tradition that it was built on the north shore of the river, and therefore within the limits of Medford. The record concerning it is as follows: July 4, 1631. The governor built a bark at Mistick, which was launched this day, and called the blessing of the Bay. Aug. 9, the same year, the governor's bark, being of thirty tons, went to sea. It cost one hundred and forty-five pounds. The owner said of it, May 16, 1636, I will sell her for one hundred and sixty pounds. There was something singularly prophetic in the fact that the first vessel built at Mistick should have so increased in price after five years of service. Our day has see
October 7th, 1641 AD (search for this): chapter 11
Rome, Sesostris those of Egypt, Semiramis those of Babylon, and Hezekiah those of Jerusalem; but we think that no good art in ship-architecture has ever been lost; and we believe that the Medford model of this year has never been surpassed. The speed and safety of our ships are proofs of our remark. The Arbella, of four hundred tons, which brought Governor Winthrop, was sixty-five days on its passage,--a period in which a Medford sailing ship now can cross the Atlantic four times. Oct. 7, 1641: General Court.--Whereas the country is now in hand with the building of ships, which is a business of great importance for the common good, and therefore suitable care is to be taken that it be well performed; it is therefore ordered, that, when any ship is to be built within this jurisdiction, it shall be lawful for the owners to appoint and put in some able man to survey the work and workmen from time to time, to see that it be performed and carried on according to the rules of their a
June 6th, 1639 AD (search for this): chapter 11
ume that the seine, being a net sent to fish with, was the first seine ever drawn in its waters, and the first drawn on this continent. This was probably in 1631; and the first draught was doubtless an event of liveliest interest, of raw wonder, and exceeding joy. If any web or filament of that pioneer seine had come down to us, it would be fitting for the town, in the year 1881, to parade it as the banner, and under it to unite in celebrating the fifth fishermen's jubilee on the river. June 6, 1639: It is ordered that all wears shall be set open from the last day of the week, at noon, till the second day in the morning. Johnson, in his Wonder-working Providence, says, The Lord is pleased to provide for them great store of fish in the spring-time, and especially alewives, about the bigness of a herring. Many thousands of these they use to put under their Indian corn. Had Mr. Cradock's letters to his agents in Medford been preserved, we should certainly have in them a complete
wind cheaper than one driven by water: nevertheless, the water-power here was sufficient, and so convenient that it soon became serviceable. April 20, 1659: Thomas Broughton sold to Edward Collins, for six hundred and fifty pounds, his two water-mills, which he built in Mistick River. They were then occupied by Thomas Eames. There was a mill a short distance below the Wear Bridge; but who built it, and how long it stood, we have not been able to discover. The place is yet occupied. In 1660, Edward Collins conveyed a gristmill on the Menotomy side to Thomas Danforth, Thomas Brooks, and Timothy Wheeler. This mill was previously occupied by Richard Cooke. There was a mill at the place now called the Bower, about one mile north of the meeting-house of the first parish, carried by the water of Marble Brook. The banks, race, canal, and cellar are yet traceable. This was used for grinding grain and sawing timber. It was on land now owned by Mr. Dudley Hall. The remains of an
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