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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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February 20th, 1746 AD (search for this): chapter 11
ed wool for spinning, and had lathes for turning wood. His house, of two stories, which he built, stood about six rods north-east from his mill. The mill stood more than forty years, and was once used for the manufacture of pomatum and starch. 1746: This year the tidemill, near Sandy Bank, was built; and it was the first of the kind in that part of the town. As it is now standing, it may be worth while to state a few facts touching its origin. Articles of agreement were concluded, Feb. 20, 1746, between Richard Sprague, cooper, Samuel Page, yeoman, Simon Tufts, Esq., physician, John Willis, yeoman, Stephen Hall, trader, Stephen Bradshaw, yeoman, Simon Bradshaw, leather-dresser, and Benjamin Parker, blacksmith, on the one part, all of Medford, and owners of land; and, on the other part, Stephen Hall, Samuel Page, and Stephen Willis, of Medford, husbandmen, and Benjamin Parker, of Charlestown, housewright, as undertakers. They, of the first part, give the portions of land they o
ntinue it. The second period of trade in Medford reached (to speak in round numbers) from 1650 to 1750, during which time the manufacture of bricks was the most important and lucrative business pursue stage-coaches, no good roads. Must not trade have been small? The third period extended from 1750 to 1805. It began to be understood that Medford could furnish the staple articles of iron, steelbuilding, and distilling, we have little to record. Wooden heels were made by Mr. Samuel Reeves, 1750; and specimens of his work are yet among his great-grandchildren in Medford. Candles and hogsheansive and profitable business was carried on in these yards for many years. At a later date, say 1750, bricks were made on land directly north of Dr. Tufts's house. The steep bank now in front of Mrn Rock Hill and the Lowell Railroad Bridge. In that yard, Samuel Francis made bricks as early as 1750, and sold them at ten shillings per thousand (lawful money). Mr. Brooks carried on the manufactur
October 16th, 1629 AD (search for this): chapter 11
Chapter 10: trade. Medford having for its friend the richest merchant belonging to the Company of the Massachusetts Plantation, its trade was great at first. Oct. 16, 1629: The General Court ordered that the company's joint stock shall have the trade of beaver and all other furs in those parts, solely, for the term of seven years from this day. May 18, 1631: It is ordered that every plantation within the limits of this patent shall, before the last day of June next, provide common weights and measures, which shall be made by some which the governor hath already sealed, and by which also all others that will have weights and measures of their own are to be made. 1635: Voted that beaver-skins shall pass for ten shillings per pound. Sept. 6, 1638: Mr. Cradock's accounts were audited in Boston. Mr. Cradock's large outlay here, for all the accommodations requisite in building schooners and carrying on an extensive fishing business, made this region a trading centre. Th
April 1st, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 11
s 1845. The tonnage of the vessels built here in that year, says Mr. Baker, was nine thousand seven hundred and twelve tons; and their aggregate, as they left our yards, about half a million of dollars. The shortest space in which a vessel was ever built in the town was twenty-six days. Her name was The Avon, a ship of four hundred tons, which, with two others built here about the same period, served as privateers in the last war with the mother country. In the five years preceding April 1, 1837, sixty vessels were built in this town, which employed two hundred thirty-nine workmen, and of which the measurement was twenty-four thousand one hundred and ninety-five tons, and the value one million one hundred and twelve thousand nine hundred and seventy dollars. All those constructed in the county, except eleven, were built here. The value of these sixty was about one-sixth of all the shipping built in the Commonwealth during the same period. In the year preceding April 1, 1845, t
erwards in a yard on land opposite the Malden Alms-house, just on the borders of East Medford. The bricks used for the construction of the six tombs first built in the old burying-ground were made in a yard owned by Thomas Brooks, Esq. That yard was near Mystic River, about half-way between Rock Hill and the Lowell Railroad Bridge. In that yard, Samuel Francis made bricks as early as 1750, and sold them at ten shillings per thousand (lawful money). Mr. Brooks carried on the manufacture in 1760, and sold them at fifteen shillings. Mr. Stephen Hall was the next occupant of that yard, which has been discontinued since 1800. In 1795, the price was four dollars. Captain Caleb Brooks made bricks on the land occupied by the second meeting-house. The banks remain visible at this time. A bed of clay was opened, in 1805, about forty rods east of the Wear Bridge, on land belonging to Spencer Bucknam, lying on the north side of the road. Only one kiln was burned there. Fountain-yar
September 6th, 1638 AD (search for this): chapter 11
aver and all other furs in those parts, solely, for the term of seven years from this day. May 18, 1631: It is ordered that every plantation within the limits of this patent shall, before the last day of June next, provide common weights and measures, which shall be made by some which the governor hath already sealed, and by which also all others that will have weights and measures of their own are to be made. 1635: Voted that beaver-skins shall pass for ten shillings per pound. Sept. 6, 1638: Mr. Cradock's accounts were audited in Boston. Mr. Cradock's large outlay here, for all the accommodations requisite in building schooners and carrying on an extensive fishing business, made this region a trading centre. This first state of things continued till the withdrawal of Mr. Cradock's property, a few years after his death. The fishing business had been unsuccessful, and no one would continue it. The second period of trade in Medford reached (to speak in round numbers) from
January 24th, 1641 AD (search for this): chapter 11
, who required houses and food within the town. The origin of the name of schooners is thus given in the Massachusetts Historical Collection. Mr. Andrew Robinson, of Gloucester, Mass., built and rigged a small vessel having two masts. At the moment of launching, a bystander cried out, Oh, how she scoons! Robinson instantly replied, A schooner let her be. And thus they named her. The first bark built in Plymouth colony was built by private subscription; and the paper bears date of January 24, 1641. It was about fifty tons, and cost two hundred pounds. That modelling is the difficult point in ship-building, is proved by the fact that science has so slowly approached that form which will safely carry the largest burden in the shortest time. From Noah's ark, which was not built for sailing, to the last improved clipper of our day, the science of modelling has produced strange results. How far the ark was a life-preserver of the arts of the antediluvians, we know not; but we ca
knives, spring-locks, brass-ware, tin, and pewter; of groceries, every thing but good tea and coffee; of dry goods, Kent linen, cotton, Irish stockings, Turkey mohair, red serge, broadcloth, muffs, ribbons, lace, silks, combs, napkins, yellow taffety, thread-lace, gloves, &c. Barter was the most common form of trade; and the exchanges were made with about half the care and selfishness so active at this day. Pitch, tar, and turpentine were brought from the interior at an early date; but, in 1755, it became an active business. Casks for them were made in Medford; and the vote of the town required that each cask should be examined by a committee, and, if well made, then marked with a double M. Coopering now became an extensive and profitable branch of business. It was begun, before the Revolution, by the agency of Mr. Benjamin Hall. Charles Henley, of Boston, was his foreman, and superintended it till 1802. Andrew Blanchard, Joseph Pierce, and James Kidder were apprentices in Mr. Ha
March 3rd, 1768 AD (search for this): chapter 11
finny adventurers, or when filth and poisons had not made their highways dangerous. We think it will be found that several species of fish will have periodic returns to places which they have left for many years. Acts of legislation have not been wanting by our town or State; but the fish care nothing about votes. The first mention of specific action by the town, as such, is dated Jan. 18, 1768, when it was voted to petition the General Court concerning the fishery in this town. March 3, 1768: Mr. Benjamin Hall and others petition the General Court for liberty to draw with seines, at two different places in Mistick River, three days in a week. This petition was not acted upon for some years. The next act of the General Court, touching this prolific trade in Medford, was in Feb. 16, 1789, and was as follows:-- An act to prevent the destruction of fish called shad and alewives in Mystic River, so called, within the towns of Cambridge, Charlestown, and Medford, and for re
ces, has these words: Ships, without either ballast or lading, may float down this (Mystic) river; otherwise, the oyster-bank would hinder them, which crosseth the channel. This oyster-bank is one of those unfortunate institutions whose fate it has been to be often run upon, and on which the draughts have been so much greater than the deposits that it long ago became bankrupt; yet, like an honest tradesman, it has never despaired; and, within our memory, has made some good fat dividends. In 1770, the sludge from the distilleries was supposed to have poisoned these shell-fish. Lobsters have not frequented our river in great numbers; but, in 1854, they came up in large companies as far as Chelsea Bridge; and, in the warm month of October, more than two thousand, of prime quality, were taken from that bridge! The names of all the fishermen in Medford cannot be recovered; but, among them, there have been men of that great energy which secures success. The fish found their market
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