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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
fight at Sharpsburg, and his flank move around Hooker, and that he had never blundered. Indeed, he ades, less than 8,000 men. In front of him was Hooker with 15,000, Mansfield with 10,000, and Sumnerer. The whole story has been too often told. Hooker, in command of what was called by the North, tdiers, Lee less than 58,000. Notwithstanding, Hooker was frightened at his own temerity in coming wn aide de camp of Jackson's, who reported that Hooker had crossed the river, Go back and tell Generace, undertook to throw his command entirely in Hooker's rear, which he accomplished with equal skilld me that he had intended, after breaking into Hooker's rear, to take and fortify a suitable positioness and intensity of Jackson on that march to Hooker's rear. His face was pale, his eyes flashing.nd told Jackson he could show him the whole of Hooker's army if he went with him to the top of a hilt, hopeful, relying on his cause and his God. Hooker's frightened, boastful, arrogant, vain-gloriou[3 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
the banks of the Opequan, we find the regiment being moved by rapid marches to meet the enemy at Fredericksburg. The part it took at Fredericksburg was not very prominent. After the death of Garland, the brigade was commanded by General Alfred Iverson, a Georgian. After the battle of Sharpsburg, and while around Fredericksburg, General Rodes commanded the division. At Chancellorsville the regiment was on the extreme left, and was conspicuous in turning the enemy's right and accomplishing Hooker's defeat. Its loss was heavy at Chancellorsville. Its Major, C. C. Blacknall, was wounded here, and fell into the hands of the enemy, was confined in the old Capitol prison at Washington, at the time the Confederate spy, Miss Belle Boyd, was there; but was exchanged in time to return to the army before Gettysburg. The loss in the 23d at Chancellorsville was officially reported by General Rodes, as 173 killed, wounded and missing. Among the killed was Captain James S. Knight, of Rockingha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
sustain. [Signed] A. P. Hill, Major-General. The regiment remained in camp until the 28th of April, 1863, when the command marched in the direction of Fredericksburg, and remained in camp below the city until the evening of May 1. On the morning of May 2 Jackson began to march upon Chancellorsville, and after a long and fatiguing journey the division was placed at right angles to the old turnpike road, Hill's Division being third in line, Rhodes' and Colston's being ahead of him. Hooker, having thrown up heavy works west, south and east, with the Chancellor house behind the center and with the dense thicket in front, was in a position almost impregnable. The flank movement was ordered about 6 o'clock in the afternoon. The Confederates rushed forward, cheering wildly, and in a few moments the enemy were completely demoralized and fled. On account of the thickets the lines had been mingled in confusion, and it was necessary to reform the lines. The third line (Hill's Divi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.31 (search)
but brilliant spectacular performance. If I learned at the time to what battery the guns belonged that fired these first shots at Sharpsburg, I have quite forgotten now. I hope some reader of the Dispatch, whose eye may fall on this article, may know. The information is earnestly sought by the Antietam Battlefield Board, of the War Department. General E. A. Carman, of that board, writes from Sharpsburg on June 5th: For some time I have been endeavoring to ascertain what force opposed Hooker's when he crossed the Antietam, on the afternoon of September 16th, and before he came in contact with Hood's division, but have been unable to get anything satisfactory. He was opposed by artillery, yet I can get no trace of any artillery within a mile of where he was first fired at. I have come to the conclusion that the gun, or guns, opposing him, must have been one or more of Pelham's, but I cannot verify my conclusion, nor can I communicate with any survivors of that battery. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
who was always in the most advanced line of battle, he who was always ready for a fight or a frolic, had been killed, his bright blue eyes looking into the very face of death without a quiver, and ready for the worst. His remains were brought to Richmond, and every eye was dimmed with tears as the soldiers bearing the body of their dead general marched down the street, while the band played Maryland, my Maryland. Only a few hours before that stalwart soldier himself had been singing Old Joe Hooker, will you come out of the Wilderness? and now he was cold in death, and never would we look upon his like again. Mrs. Semmes related with tears in her eyes how the news of Stonewall Jackson's death had been received in Richmond. Many refused to believe that this bravest Roman of them all was dead. She herself went out on the street to ascertain the truth, and as she approached the capitol she met some soldiers carrying a covered corpse and marching with bowed heads to the beat of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
hwestern Virginians, and was ordered to Petersburg. In April, 1863, by request of Stonewall Jackson, who had been for ten years his colleague in the faculty of the Virginia Military Institute, and knew him well, General Colston was assigned to the command of a brigade in Trimble's division, of Jackson's corps. At Chancellorsville, at 6 o'clock P. M., May 2, 1863, the hour when Stonewall Jackson ordered his corps of 26,000 men to disclose their presence in rear of the right flank of General Hooker's grand army, Jackson's command was formed, with Rodes' division in front, Trimble's division under Colston (Trimble being disabled), in the second line two yards in the rear, and A. P. Hill's division in supporting distance in column. At the word, the men burst with a cheer upon the startled enemy, and like a disciplined thunderbolt, swept down his line and captured cannon before they could be reversed to fire. Rodes, who led with so much spirit, said, that the enemy taken in flank an
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