hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 286 results in 195 document sections:

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
nt lost during service 30 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 24 Enlisted men by disease. Total 54. 201st Pennsylvania Regiment Infantry. Organized at Harrisburg August 29, 1864. Moved to Chambersburg, Pa., September, and duty there till September 28. Company H at York, Pa., September 17. Companies F and G to Bloody Run September 17. Company E to Scranton September 18. Rest of Regiment guard Manassas Gap Railroad till November. At Camp Slough, Alexandria, November 13. Company G moved to Pittsburg May 24, 1865. Regiment moved to Fort Delaware May 26. Mustered out June 21, 1865. Regiment lost during service 1 Enlisted man killed and 15 Enlisted men by disease. Total 16. 202nd Pennsylvania Regiment Infantry. Organized at Harrisburg September 3, 1864. Moved to Chambersburg, Pa., September 10. Attached to Dept. of the Susquehanna to October, 1864. District of Alexandria, 22nd Corps, to November, 1864. 1st Separate Brigade, 22
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Tennessee Volunteers. (search)
Operations against Breckenridge in East Tennessee November 4-17. Russellville November 11. Bull's Gap November 11-13. Russellville November 14. Strawberry Plains November 16-17. Flat Creek November 17. Stoneman's Saltsville (Va.ns against Breckenridge's advance into East Tennessee November 4-17. Russellville November 11. Bull's Gap November 11-13. Russellville November 14. Strawberry Plains November 16-17. Flat Creek November 17. Stoneman's Saltsville Raid 27. Morristown and Russellville October 28. Operations against Breckenridge November 4-17. Bull's Gap November 11-13. Morristown November 13. Russellville November 14. Strawberry Plains November 16-17. Duty in East Tennessee tilNovember 13. Russellville November 14. Strawberry Plains November 16-17. Duty in East Tennessee till March, 1865. Stoneman's Expedition from East Tennessee into Southwest Virginia and Western North Carolina March 21-April 25, 1865. Wytheville April 6. Martinsville April 8. Shallow Ford and near Mocksville April 11. Saulsbury April
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Vermont Volunteers. (search)
, 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to July, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac and Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to June, 1865. Service. Camp at Arlington Heights till September 14, 1862. March to Seneca Locks, Md., September 14-17, and guard duty along the Potomac from Edward's Ferry to Muddy Branch till October 11 and at Seneca Creek till November 13. At Offutt's Cross Roads till December 21. Moved to Poolesville December 21, and duty at White's Ford (Cos. C, E, H and I ); at mouth of the Monocacy (Cos. A, F and D ); at Conrad's Ferry (Cos. B, G and K ) till April 19, 1863. At Poolesville, Md., to June 24. Moved to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., June 24-26, thence to Frederick, Md., June 30, and to Monocacy July 2. Pursuit of Lee July 6-23. Wapping Heights July 23. At Routt's Hill August 1-September 15. At Culpeper
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, West Virginia Volunteers. (search)
ville May 12 Fayetteville May 18-20. Scout on Big and Little Coal Rivers June 18-19. Loup Creek June 26 (Cos. B and I ). Raleigh July 4. Expedition from Fayetteville to Wytheville July 13-25. Shady Springs July 14. Wytheville July 18-19. Fayetteville July 28. Cold Springs Gap August 5 (Detachment). Scouts from Camp Piatt September 11-13. Smythe County September 14. Scout to Boone Court House October 21-22. Expedition from Charlestown to Lewisburg November 3-13. Little Sewell Mountain November 6. Capture of Lewisburg November 7. Muddy Creek November 7. Near Union November 8. Scammon's Demonstration from the Kanawha Valley December 8-25. Meadow Bluff December 11. Lewisburg and Greenbrier River December 12. Scout in Cabell and Wayne Counties March 16-18, 1864. Averill's Raid on Virginia & Tennessee Railroad May 5-19. Princeton, Grassy Lick Cove, near Wytheville, Wytheville, Ingle and Cove Gap May 10. Salt Pond and Pond
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
e of Vicksburg, Miss., May 18-July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22. Expedition to Mechanicsburg and Satartia June 2-8. Mechanicsburg, Satartia, June 4. Expedition to Richmond June 14-16. Richmond June 15. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 4-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Camp at Bear Creek till September 26. Expedition to Canton October 14-20. Bogue Chitto Creek October 17. At Big Black River Bridge till November 7. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., November 7-13. Duty there, at LaGrange and at Salisbury till January 27, 1864. Expedition to Pocahontas December 2-4, 1863. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., January 27-February 3. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 2. Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson's Hill March 21. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. About Cloutiersville April 22-24. At Alexandria April 26-May 13. Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Pursuit to Booneville May 30-June 12. Duty at Corinth till September. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Hatchie River October 5-12. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central Railroad November 2, 1862, to January 10, 1863. Duty at Corinth, Miss., till May, 1863, and at Memphis, Tenn., till October. Movement to Prospect, Tenn., October 18-November 13. Duty there and at Decatur, Ala., till April, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. Battle of Resaca May 13, 14 and 15. Battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 9-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Ruff's Mills July 3-4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of At
enty-eighth he attacked and captured a force of the enemy at Egypt, and destroyed a train of fourteen cars; thence, turning to the south-west, he struck the Mississippi Central railroad at Winona, and destroyed the factories and large amounts of stores at Bankston, and the machine-shops and public property at Grenada, arriving at Vicksburg January fifth. During these operations in Middle Tennessee, the enemy, with a force under General Breckinridge, entered East Tennessee. On the thirteenth of November, he attacked General Gillem, near Morristown, capturing his artillery and several hundred prisoners. Gillem, with what was left of his command, retreated to Knoxville. Following up his success, Breckinridge moved to near Knoxville, but withdrew on the eighteenth, followed by General Ammen. Under the directions of General Thomas, General Stoneman concentrated the commands of Generals Burbridge and Gillem near Bean's station, to operate against Breckinridge, and destroy or drive him
ring, nothing of importance occurred from the third to the fifteenth December. In the meanwhile I was preparing to take the offensive without delay; the cavalry was being remounted under the direction of General Wilson as rapidly as possible, and new transportation furnished where it was required. During these operations in Middle Tennessee, the enemy, under Breckinridge, Duke, and Vaughn, was operating in the eastern portion of the State against Generals Ammen and Gillem. On the thirteenth November, at midnight, Breckinridge, with a force estimated at three thousand, attacked General Gillem near Morris-town, routing him and capturing his artillery, besides taking several hundred prisoners; the remainder of the command, about one thousand in number, escaped to Strawberry Plains, and thence to Knoxville. General Gillem's force consisted of fifteen hundred men, composing three regiments of Tennessee cavalry, and six guns, belonging formerly to the Fourth division of cavalry, Army
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Dr. W. T. G. Morton (search)
ed in him as the man of the hour, deserve the highest commendation. Doctor Warren had invited Doctor Jackson to attend this critical experiment with sulphuric ether at the Massachusetts Hospital; but he declined with the trite excuse that he was obliged to go out of town. This has been generally interpreted by the medical profession as a lack of courage on Jackson's part to face the music, but it may also have been owing to his jealousy of Morton. This happened October 16th, and on November 13th, Dr. C. T. Jackson wrote to M. Elie de Beaumont, a member of the French Academy, this remarkable letter: I request permission to communicate through your medium to the Academy of Sciences a discovery which I have made, and which I believe important for the relief of suffering humanity, as well as of great value to the surgical profession. Five or six years ago I noticed the peculiar state of insensibility into which the nervous system is thrown by the inhalation of the vapor of pu
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
slowly, and am quite cheerful in view of my approaching end, being fully persuaded that I am worth inconceivably more to hang than for any other purpose. God Almighty bless and save you all. Your affectionate brother, John Brown. P. S. Nov. 13.-Say to my poor boys never to grieve for one moment on my account; and should many of you live to see the time when you will not blush to own your relation to Old John Brown, it will not be more strange than many things that have happened. I fod and Saviour of you all. Farewell, till we meet again. Your friend, in truth, John Brown. Letter to his wife. Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., 16th Nov., 1859. My dear Wife: I write you in answer to a most kind letter, of November 13, from dear Mrs.--. I owe her ten thousand thanks for her kindness to you particularly, and more especially than for what she has done, and is doing, in a more direct way for me personally. Although I feel grateful for every expression of kind
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...