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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1759 AD or search for 1759 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Watson, Sir Brook 1735- (search)
Watson, Sir Brook 1735- Military officer; born in Plymouth, England, Feb. 7, 1735; entered the naval service early in life, but while bathing in the sea at Havana in 1749 a shark bit off his right leg below the knee, and he abandoned the sea and entered upon mercantile business. He was with Colonel Monckton in Nova Scotia in 1755, and was at the siege of Louisburg in 1758, having in charge Wolfe's division, as commissary. In 1759 he settled as a merchant in London, and afterwards in Montreal. Just before the Revolutionary War he visited several of the colonies, with false professions of political friendship for them, as a Whig. A friend of Sir Guy Carleton, he was made his commissary-general in America in 1782, and from 1784 to 1793 he was member of Parliament for London. He was sheriff of London and Middlesex, and in 1796 was lord mayor. For his services in America, Parliament voted his wife an annuity of $2,000 for life. From 1798 to 1806 he was commissary-general of En
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webber, Samuel 1759-1810 (search)
Webber, Samuel 1759-1810 Educator; born in Byfield, Mass., in 1759; graduated at Harvard College in 1784; entered the ministry; and became a tutor in Harvard in 1787; was Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy there in 1789-1804, and then became president. He was one of the commissioners appointed to settle the boundary-line between the United States and the British provinces; vicepresident of the American Academy; author of System of Mathematics; Eulogy On President Willard; a1759; graduated at Harvard College in 1784; entered the ministry; and became a tutor in Harvard in 1787; was Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy there in 1789-1804, and then became president. He was one of the commissioners appointed to settle the boundary-line between the United States and the British provinces; vicepresident of the American Academy; author of System of Mathematics; Eulogy On President Willard; and reviser of Jedidiah Morse's American universal geography. He died in Cambridge, Mass., July 17, 1810. Webster, Daniel
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whipple, Abraham 1733- (search)
Whipple, Abraham 1733- Naval officer; born in Providence, R. I., Sept. 16, 1733; went to sea in early life; commanded a ship in the West India trade, and in 1759-60 was captain of a privateer, capturing in a single cruise twenty-six French vessels. His vessel was called the Game Cock. In June, 1772, Whipple commanded the volunteers who burned the Gaspee in Narraganset Bay. In 1775 he was put in command of two armed vessels fitted out by Rhode Island, and was given the title of commodore. With these he drove Sir James Wallace, in command of the frigate Rose, out of Narraganset Bay. He was in command of a flotilla in the harbor of Charleston at the time of the siege and capture of that city in 1780. On March 21 of that year, the British marine force, under Admiral Arbuthnot, crossed the bar at Charleston. It consisted of one 54-gun ship, two 44-gun ships, four of thirty-two guns, and the Sandwich, also an armed ship. Whipple was in the outer harbor with a flotilla of small
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whipple, William 1730- (search)
Whipple, William 1730- A signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Kittery, Me., Jan. 14, 1730; became a sailor; removed to Portsmouth, N. H., in 1759, where he engaged in the West India trade and African slave-trade, in which he acquired a considerable fortune. He was a member of the Provincial Congress in 1775, and of the Continental Congress in 1776. He was brigadier-general of the New Hampshire troops at Saratoga in the Revolutionary War; signed the articles of capitulation with Burgoyne: was a member of Congress in 1778-79; financial receiver of the State of New Hampshire in 1782-84, and judge of the Superior Court from 1782 till his death, in Portsmouth, Nov. 28, 1785.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whittemore, Amos 1759-1828 (search)
Whittemore, Amos 1759-1828 Inventor; born in Cambridge, Mass., April 19, 1759; reared a farmer; became a gunsmith; and then, with his brother, a manufacturer of cotton and wool-cards, or card-cloth. He claimed to have invented a machine for puncturing the leather and setting the wires, which was patented in 1797. Before that time the work had been performed slowly by hand. The establishment of spinning machinery in New England (see Slater, Samuel) had made the business of card-making profitable, and so useful was Whittemore's machine that the patent was sold for $150,000. His brother Samuel afterwards repurchased it and carried on the business of making card-cloth. Amos died in West Cambridge, March 27, 1828. Whittier, John Greenleaf
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Winslow, John 1702-1774 (search)
Winslow, John 1702-1774 Military officer; born in Plymouth, Mass.. May 27, 1702; was the principal actor, under superior orders, in the tragedy of the expulsion of the Acadians from Nova Scotia in 1755. It is said that, twenty years afterwards, nearly every person of Winslow's lineage was a refugee on the soil from which the Acadians were driven. In 1756 Winslow was commander-in-chief at Fort William Henry, Lake George, and a major-general in the expedition against Canada in 1758-59. In 1762 he was appointed presiding judge of the court of common pleas of Plymouth, Mass., and councillor and member of the Massachusetts legislature during the Stamp Act excitement. He was an original founder of the town of Winslow, Me., in 1766. He died in Hingham, Mass., April 17, 1774. See Acadia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wisner, Henry 1725-1790 (search)
Wisner, Henry 1725-1790 Patriot; born in Goshen, N. Y., about 1725; was an assistant justice of the court of common pleas in 1768; representative from Orange county in the New York General Assembly in 1759-69; member of the Continental Congress in 1774, and of the Congress which adopted the Declaration of Independence. He studied powder-making and erected three powder-mills in Orange county, from which a great part of the powder used in the Revolutionary War was supplied. He also aided the patriot cause at the time of the war by having spears and gun-flints made, by repairing the roads in Orange county; and by erecting works and mounting cannon on the Hudson River. He was one of the committee that framed the first constitution of New York in 1777; was State Senator in 1777-82; and a member of the State convention of 1788, which ratified the national Constitution. He died in Goshen, N. Y., in 1790.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wolfe, James 1727- (search)
Wolfe, James 1727- Military officer; born in Westerham, Kent, England, Jan. 2, 1727; distinguished himself in the army when he was only twenty years of age; and was quartermaster-general in the expedition against Rochefort in 1757. At the secondcapture of Louisburg by the English, in 1758, he acquired such fame that Pitt placed him at the head of the expedition against Quebec in 1759, with the rank of major-general, though only thirty-three years of age. On the evening of Sept. 12, Wolfe, who had just recovered from a serious attack of fever, embarked with his main army on the St. Lawrence, above Point Levi, and floated up the river with the flood-tide. He was preparing for an attack upon the French the next day. The evening was warm and starlit. Wolfe was in better spirits than usual, and at the evening mess, with a glass of wine in his hand, and by the light of a lantern, he sang the little campaign song beginning: Why, soldiers, why Should we be melancholy, boys? Why,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wrangel, Charles Magnus von 1730-1786 (search)
Wrangel, Charles Magnus von 1730-1786 Clergyman; born in Sweden about 1730; educated at the University of Upsala; ordained Court preacher to the King of Sweden; settled in Philadelphia in 1759, and took charge of all the Swedish Lutheran bodies in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. After nine years of faithful and successful work he returned to Sweden. He died in Sala, Sweden, in 1786.
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