Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1780 AD or search for 1780 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 257 results in 222 document sections:

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hancock, John 1737- (search)
Declaration of Independence. In February, 1778, he was appointed first majorgeneral of the Massachusetts militia, and took part in Sullivan's campaign in Rhode Island in August following. He was a member of the Massachusetts State convention in 1780, and governor of the State from 1780 to 1785, and from 1787 till his death in Quincy, Oct. 8, 1793. He was president of the State convention that adopted the national Constitution. Hancock's residence was in a fine stone mansion on Beacon street1780 to 1785, and from 1787 till his death in Quincy, Oct. 8, 1793. He was president of the State convention that adopted the national Constitution. Hancock's residence was in a fine stone mansion on Beacon street, fronting the Common. It was built by his uncle, Thomas Hancock. In the autumn of 1789 President Washington made a tour through portions of the New England States. He arrived at Boston on Saturday, Oct. 24. Hancock, who was then governor, had invited the President to lodge at his house in Boston, which the latter declined. After Washington's arrival, Hancock sent him an invitation to come and dine with him and his family informally that day at the close of the public reception ceremonie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hand, Edward 1744- (search)
Hand, Edward 1744- Military officer; born in Clyduff, King's co., Ireland, Dec. 31, 1744; came to America in the 8th Royal Irish Regiment, in 1774, as surgeon's mate; resigned his post on his arrival, and settled in Pennsylvania for the practice of the medical profession. He joined a regiment as lieutenant-colonel at the outbreak of the Revolution, and served in the siege of Boston. Made colonel in 1776, he led his regiment in the battle on Long Island, and also at Trenton. In April, 1777, he was appointed brigadier-general; and in October, 1778, succeeded Stark in command at Albany. In Sullivan's campaign against the Indians, in 1779, he was an active participant. Near the close of 1780, Hand succeeded Scammnel as adjutant-general. He was a member of Congress in 1784-85, and assisted in the formation of the constitution of Pennsylvania in 1790. He (lied in Rockford, Lancaster co., Pa., Sept. 3. 1802.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hart, John 1708-1780 (search)
Hart, John 1708-1780 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Hopewell, N. J., in 1708; was a farmer, scantily educated, but a man of strong common-sense, patriotism, and moral excellence. He was in Congress from 1774 till 1777, and suffered much at the hands of the loyalists. He was compelled to flee from his home, and was hunted from place to place until the capture of the Hessians at Trenton (see Trenton, battle of). He was called honest John Hart. He died in Hopewell, in 17art, John 1708-1780 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Hopewell, N. J., in 1708; was a farmer, scantily educated, but a man of strong common-sense, patriotism, and moral excellence. He was in Congress from 1774 till 1777, and suffered much at the hands of the loyalists. He was compelled to flee from his home, and was hunted from place to place until the capture of the Hessians at Trenton (see Trenton, battle of). He was called honest John Hart. He died in Hopewell, in 1780.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hartford conventions. (search)
Hartford conventions. Two noteworthy conventions have been held in Hartford, Conn. The first was on Oct. 20, 1779, when the alarming depreciation of the Continental paper-money was producing great anxiety throughout the colonies. There were delegates from five of the Eastern States. They proposed a new regulation of prices, on the basis of $20 in paper for $1 in coin; and they advised a general convention at Philadelphia at the beginning of 1780, to adopt a scheme for all the colonies. Congress approved the suggestion of the convention, but urged the States to adopt the regulation at once, without waiting for a general convention. The second, politically known as the Hartford Convention, was convened on Dec. 15, 1814. Because the Massachusetts militia had not been placed under General Dearborn's orders, the Secretary of State, in an official letter to Governor Strong, refused to pay the expenses of defending Massachusetts from the common foe. Similar action, for similar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hayne, Isaac 1745- (search)
Hayne, Isaac 1745- Patriot; born in South Carolina, Sept. 23, 1745; was an extensive planter and owner of iron works; captain of artillery and State Senator in 1780. He was made a prisoner at the capture of Charleston, and returned to his home on parole. Early in 1781 he was ordered to take up arms as a British subject or go to Charleston a prisoner, his wife and children then being dangerously sick with small-pox. He went to Charleston, where he was required to bear arms in support of the royal government or suffer close confinement. On being assured that if he would sign a declaration of allegiance to the British crown he would not be required to bear arms against his countrymen, he did so, and hastened home to find his wife dying and one of his children dead. Finally he was summoned to take up arms against his people. This being in violation of his agreement, it dissolved all obligations, and he repaired to the American camp, received a commission as colonel, and was soo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Heath, William 1737-1814 (search)
Artillery Company of Boston, and was made its commander in 1770. He was also colonel of a Suffolk regiment; was a representative in the General Assembly; member of the committees of correspondence and safety; delegate to the Provincial Congress (1774-75), and was made a brigadiergeneral early in 1776 in the Continental army. He rose to major-general in August following. He was very serviceable in organizing the undisciplined troops at Cambridge before the battle of Bunker Hill, and went to New York with Washington in the spring of 1776. After the battle of White Plains he took post in the Hudson Highlands, and was stationed there in 1779. He had supervision of Burgoyne's captured troops, in 1777, at Cambridge. He went to Rhode Island on the arrival of the French forces in 1780. General Heath was State Senator in 1791-92; probate judge of Norfolk county in 1793, and declined the office of lieutenant-governor in 1806, to which he had been chosen. He died in Roxbury, Jan. 24, 1814.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Heyward, Thomas 1746-1809 (search)
Heyward, Thomas 1746-1809 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in St. Luke's parish, S. C., in 1746; studied law in England, made a tour in Europe, and on his return became a warm defender of the rights of the colonies. He was a member of the first General Assembly of South Carolina after the flight of the royal governor. He was also a member of the committee of safety, and a delegate in Congress from 1775 to 1778, when he was appointed a judge. He was also in active military service in South Carolina, and in 1780 was wounded. Captured at the fall of Charleston, he was sent a prisoner to St. Augustine. He retired from public life in 1799, and died in St. Luke's parish, March 6, 1809.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hinman, Elisha 1734-1807 (search)
Hinman, Elisha 1734-1807 Naval officer; born in Stonington, Conn., March 9, 1734; went to sea at the age of fourteen years, and was a captain at nineteen, sailing to Europe and the Indies. He entered the navy of the Revolution, under Hopkins, in 1776, and was one of the first captains appointed by Congress. He was a very active officer. Captured when in command of the Alfred, thirty-two guns, he was taken to England, whence he escaped to France, and cruised successfully after his return, in 1779-80. President Adams offered him the command of the Constitution in 1798, but on account of his age he declined. From that time until 1802 he was engaged in the revenue service. He died in Stonington, Aug. 29, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Holland. (search)
a successful application for a loan, which was a seasonable aid for the exhausted treasury of the colonies. The treaty was signed at The Hague by John Adams and the representatives of the Netherlands, and was ratified in January, 1783. Late in 1780 Great Britain, satisfied that the Netherlands would give national aid to the rebellious colonies, and desirous of keeping that power from joining the Armed Neutrality League, sought a pretext for declaring war against the Dutch. British cruisers had already depredated upon Dutch commerce in time of peace, and the British government treated the Netherlands more as a vassal than as an independent nation. The British ministry found a pretext for war in October (1780), when Henry Laurens, late president of the American Congress, was captured on the high seas by a British cruiser, and with him were found evidences of the negotiation of a treaty between the United States and the Netherlands, which had been in progress some time. On Dec. 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howard, John eager 1752-1827 (search)
Howard, John eager 1752-1827 Military officer; born in Baltimore county, Md., June 4, 1752; was a captain in Hull's regiment John eager Howard. at the battle of White Plains; became a major in the Continental army in 1777; and was distinguished in the battle of Germantown. He was in the battle of Monmouth (q. v.), and was made a lieutenant-colonel. In 1780 he was detailed, with the Maryland and Delaware troops, to serve in the Southern Department. In Gates's defeat, near Camden, he participared, and he led the Continental infantry in the battle of the Cowpens, at one time holding in his hands the swords of seven surrendered British officers. For his conduct there Congress voted him a silver medal. It was the first occasion during the Revolutionary War in which the bayonet was effectively used. He was distinguished in the battles of Guildford, Hobkirk's Hill, and Eutaw Springs, and was severely wounded in the latter engagement After the war he married a daughter of Chief-J
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...