hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 1 1 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 561 results in 398 document sections:

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Douglass, Frederick, 1817- (search)
City; in 1871 was appointed assistant secretary of the commission to Santo Domingo; then became one of the Territorial Council of the District of Columbia; in 1876-81 was United States marshal for the District; in 1881-86 was n recorder of deeds there; and in 1889-91 was United States minister to Haiti. He we was author of NarraUnited States marshal for the District; in 1881-86 was n recorder of deeds there; and in 1889-91 was United States minister to Haiti. He we was author of Narrative of my experiences in slavery (1844); My bondage and my. Freedom (1855); and Life and times of Frederick Douglass (1881). He died near Washington, D. C., Feb. 20, 1895.United States marshal for the District; in 1881-86 was n recorder of deeds there; and in 1889-91 was United States minister to Haiti. He we was author of Narrative of my experiences in slavery (1844); My bondage and my. Freedom (1855); and Life and times of Frederick Douglass (1881). He died near Washington, D. C., Feb. 20, 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Durant, Henry Towle, 1822-1881 (search)
Durant, Henry Towle, 1822-1881 Philanthropist; born in Hanover, N. H., Feb. 20, 1822; graduated at Harvard College in 1841; admitted to the bar in 1846; and became connected with Rufus Choate and other celebrated lawyers in practice in Boston. Later he abandoned the practice of law to devote himself to the cause of religion and education. After a few years his plans for an institution where women might receive a higher education were realized, and Wellesley College was founded at a cost of $1,000,000. The institution was opened in September, 1875, and was maintained by him at an expense of $50,000 a year until his death, and afterwards was aided by his widow. He died in Wellesley, Mass., Oct. 3, 1881.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eads, James Buchanan, 1820- (search)
e kind in the world. Then he pressed upon the attention of the government his plan for improving the navigation of the mouth of the Mississippi by jetties. He was authorized to undertake it (and was very successful), for which the government paid him $5,125,000. At the time of his death, in Nassau, N. P., March 8, 1887, he was engaged in the promotion of a project he had conceived of constructing a ship railway across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. In 1881 he received the Albert medal from the British Society of Arts, the first American to be thus honored. The jetty system consists simply of a dike or embankment projecting into the water, whose purpose is to narrow the channel so that the natural action of the water will keep it clear of sediment or other obstruction. The Mississippi River is, at its mouth, 40 feet deep and 1 3/4 miles wide, and carries every minute 72,000,000 feet of water to the Gulf, which holds in solution nearly 20 per
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Electricity in the nineteenth century. (search)
lding teeth in saws, for making many parts of bicycles, and in tool making. An instance of its peculiar adaptability to unusual conditions is the welding of the iron bands embedded within the body of a rubber vehicle tire for holding the tire in place. For this purpose the electric weld has been found almost essential. Another branch of electric development concerns the storage of electricity. The storage battery is based upon principles discovered by Gaston Plante, and applied, since 1881, by Brush, by Faure, and others. Some of the larger lighting stations employ as reservoirs of electric energy large batteries charged by surplus dynamo current. This is afterwards drawn upon when the consumer's load is heavy, as during the evening. The storage battery is, however, a heavy, cumbrous apparatus, of limited life, easily destroyed unless guarded with skill. If a form not possessing these faults be ever found, the field of possible application is almost limitless. The wonder
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Evarts, William Maxwell, 1818-1881 (search)
Evarts, William Maxwell, 1818-1881 Statesman; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 6, 1818; graduated at Yale College in 1837; studied law, and was admitted to the bar, in the city of New York, in 1840, where he William Maxwell Evarts. afterwards resided and practised his profession. He was one of the ablest and most eloquent members of the bar, and held a foremost rank in his profession for many years. He was the leading counsel employed for the defence of President Johnson in his impeachment ore the Senate in 1868. President Hayes appointed Mr. Evarts Secretary of State in March, 1877, and in January, 1885, he was elected United States Senator, holding the seat till 1891. He died in New York City, Feb. 28, 1901. Bimetallism. In 1881, after the conclusion of his term of service in the cabinet, he went to Paris as delegate of the United States to the International Monetary Conference. He there made the following plea for the employment of both gold and silver in the money of t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Expositions, industrial. (search)
ity. The United States stands alone in maintaining four permanent expositions: one in the former Art Palace of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, now known as the Field Columbian Museum; another in the former Memorial Hall of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; and two, known as Commercial Museums, in Philadelphia. The following is a list of the principal industrial expositions of the world, to nearly all of which the United States has been a large contributor: London, 1851; Cork, 1852; New York, New Brunswick, Madras, and Dublin, each 1853; Munich, 1854; Paris, 1855; Edinburgh and Manchester, each 1857; London, 1862; Paris, 1867; Vienna, 1873; Philadelphia, 1876; Paris, 1878; Atlanta, 1881; Louisville, 1883; New Orleans, 1884-85; Paris, 1889; Chicago, 1893; Atlanta, 1895; Nashville, 1897; Omaha, 1898; Omaha and Philadelphia, each 1899; Paris, 1900; Buffalo and Glasgow, each 1901. For details of the most noteworthy of these expositions, see their respective titles.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fairfax, Donald McNeill 1822-1894 (search)
Fairfax, Donald McNeill 1822-1894 Naval officer; born in Virginia, Aug. 10, 1822; joined the navy in 1837; and served with the Pacific fleet during the war with Mexico. In 1862-63 he was with Farragut; was then given command successively of the Nantucket and the Montauk, with which he took part in a number of attacks upon the defences of Charleston Harbor; and in 1864-65 was superintendent of the Naval Academy. He was promoted rear-admiral in July, 1880; retired in 1881. He died in Hagerstown, Md., Jan. 11, 1894.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fargo, William George 1818-1881 (search)
Fargo, William George 1818-1881 Expressman; born in Pompey, N. Y., May 20, 1818; became the Buffalo agent of the Pomeroy Express Company in 1843; established the first express company west of Buffalo in partnership with Henry Wells and Daniel Dunning in 1844. The line was extended until it reached San Francisco, Cal. In 1868 Mr. Fargo became president of the corporation, which by the time of his death had 2,700 offices, over 5,000 employees, and a capital of $18,000,000. The city of Fargo, N. D., was named after him. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., Aug. 3, 1881. See pony express.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fearing, Benjamin Dana 1837-1881 (search)
Fearing, Benjamin Dana 1837-1881 Military officer; born in Harmar, O., Oct. 10, 1837; enlisted in the 2d Ohio Regiment at the outbreak of the Civil War; took part in the battles of Bull Run, Shiloh, Hoover's Gap, and at Chickamauga, where he was severely wounded. During Sherman's march to the sea he commanded a brigade and was again wounded at Bentonville. General Sherman spoke of him as the bravest man that fought on Shiloh's field. He died in Harmar, O., Dec. 9, 1881.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fields, James Thomas 1817-1881 (search)
Fields, James Thomas 1817-1881 Publisher; born in Portsmouth, N. H., Dec. 31, 1817; was educated in his native place; went to Boston and became a clerk in a book-store in 1834. Soon after he reached his majority he became a partner in the publishing firm of Ticknor, Reed & Fields, of which he remained a member till 1870. After retiring from the publishing business Mr. Fields became a lecturer on literary subjects. His published works include a volume of Poems; A few verses for a few friends; Yesterdays with authors; Hawthorne; and In and out of doors with Charles Dickens. James Thomas fields. He was editor of the Atlantic monthly in 1862-70, and afterwards (with Edwin P. Whipple) edited the Family Library of English poetry. He died in Boston, April 24, 1881.
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...