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ing at Norfolk. 9. James Longstreet, Alabama, Army of Potomac. 10. John B. Magruder, Virginia, commanding at Yorktown. 11. Thomas J. Jackson, Virginia, commanding Northwestern Virginia. 12. Mansfield Lovell, Virginia, commanding Coast of Louisiana. 13. Edmund Kirby Smith, Florida, Army of Potomac. 14. George B. Crittenden, Kentucky, commanding East Tennessee. Brigadier-Generals in the Provisional army. 1. Milledge L. Bonham, South Carolina, Army of Potomac. 2. John B. Floyd, Virginia, commanding Army of Kanawha. 3. Henry A. Wise, Virginia, waiting orders. 4. Ben McCulloch, Texas, Missouri. 5. Those having a * affixed are dead, or have resigned since the commencement of the war. Henry R. Jackson, Georgia, resigned. 6. Those having a * affixed are dead, or have resigned since the commencement of the war. Robert S. Garnett, Virginia, killed in action. 7. Those having a * affixed are dead, or have resigned since the commencement of the war. Wi
ut., U. S. N., D. 73 Bryce, —, Col., D. 37 Buchanan, James, President of U. S., D. 7; receives Hayne of S. C., D. 14; notice of, D. 59; correspondence with Floyd, Doc. 10; correspondence with the South Carolina Commissioners, Doc. 11; recommendation for a fast, Dec. 14, 1860, Doc. 17; agitated at the surrender of Federal arordinance of secession D. 18; authorities of, seize the U. S. schooner Dana, D. 14; act of the Legislature of, defining treason, D. 19; troops of, D. 29 Floyd, John B., resigns, D. 7; cause of his resignation, D. 7; New York Journal of Commerce's apology for, P. 11; banquet to, at Richmond, D. 13; indicted at Washington, D. Jones, Thomas, Gen., D. 39 Jones, William, Capt., hung, P. 38 Jouett, James E., Lt. U. S. N., P. 21 Journal of Commerce, (N. Y.,) its apology for J. B. Floyd, P. 11 Julia Mildred, P. 65 Junkin, Dr., President of Washington College, Ky., resigns, P. 99 K Kallman, Colonel, D. 105 Kane, Marshal, r
a meeting of the general officers, called by Gen. Floyd, it was unanimously determined to give the en. Grant's do. K — Rebel Batteries. G--Gen. Floyd's Brigade. L--Gen. Davidson's Brigade. icer had a right to cause such a sacrifice. Gen. Floyd and Maj. Gilmer I understood to concur in the, he would surrender if placed in command. Gen. Floyd said he would turn over the command to him iTo this Gen. Buckner consented. Thereupon General Floyd turned the command over to me. I passed it was from passing over the battle-field with Gen. Floyd in the evening immediately after the battle.nd it is asserted by many that he was killed. Floyd some time since proved himself a thief, and noeenth Mississippi advanced to make a charge, Gen. Floyd rode up, and, raising himself in his stirrupef at Nashville, that fully five thousand of Gen. Floyd's division were safe. What became of the caapitulated to the enemy on their own terms. Floyd, Pillow, and Buckner fought like heroes. They[20 more...]
e and no gunboats and no Federal army from Kentucky. Gen. Johnston left for the South, placing Gen. Floyd in command, assisted by Generals Pillow and Hardee. The apprehensions of the near approach of the enemy having been found groundless, it was determined by Gen. Floyd that the destruction of the stores was premature, and an order was sent to close the warehouses, and a force detailed to collecfully protected and amply remunerated. R. B. Cheatham, Mayor. February 26, 1862. Of course, Floyd, Pillow and Co., long ere the National troops had possession, were long miles away from the viciway Fort Donelson was holding out. It was better located, and stronger in men and guns. Pillow, Floyd, and Buckner were there. Pillow had said, Let come what might, he never would surrender the plae enemy out of it. For Tennesseeans are resolved that the enemy shall not rest on their soil. Gen. Floyd and staff left Thursday morning, and it was understood that Capt. John H. Morgan, with his com
A private in battery F, Fourth U. S. artillery, writes the following epitaph for John B. Floyd: Floyd has died and few have sobbed, Since, had he lived, all had been robbed: He's paid Dame Nature's debt, 'tis said The only one he ever paid. Some doubt that he resigned his breath, But vow he has cheated even death. If he is buriFloyd has died and few have sobbed, Since, had he lived, all had been robbed: He's paid Dame Nature's debt, 'tis said The only one he ever paid. Some doubt that he resigned his breath, But vow he has cheated even death. If he is buried, oh! then, ye dead, beware, Look to your swaddlings, of your shrouds take care, Lest Floyd should to your coffins make his way, And steal the linen from your mouldering clay. 's paid Dame Nature's debt, 'tis said The only one he ever paid. Some doubt that he resigned his breath, But vow he has cheated even death. If he is buried, oh! then, ye dead, beware, Look to your swaddlings, of your shrouds take care, Lest Floyd should to your coffins make his way, And steal the linen from your mouldering clay.
On Saturday night, before the surrender, a council of war was called. Pillow, Floyd, Buckner, and a number of brigadiers, composed this body. There was much confud some did not. It was midnight, and no definite understanding was come to. General Floyd, seeing this, dismissed the council, requesting Pillow and Buckner to remaiire, to ponder over the sad aspect of affairs. A long silence ensued. At last Floyd said: Well, gentlemen, it remains with us to decide this matter, and we mshed enough blood already to no purpose, said Buckner. Well, gentlemen, said Floyd, I see you are still divided; and as I have the casting vote, I will settle the the fireplace, and seated himself without saying a word. After a few moments, Floyd said: Well, Colonel, have you any thing important to communicate, that yockets also, and there is no danger to be feared. Yes; but, Colonel, said General Floyd, my scouts have reconnoitred the entire river, and an officer who arrived n
The Keeper of the Richmond Bastile.--Capt. T. D. Jeffress, C. S. A., has been assigned to the command of the confederate States military prison, known as the Libby, corner of Twentieth and Cary streets. Capt. Jeffress was attached to the Fifty-sixth Virginia regiment, and was with Gen. John B. Floyd in Western Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee, and also served in the battles of Gaines's Mills and Frazier's Dam, around Richmond, where for gallant and meritorious service he received honorable mention in the brigade report.--Richmond Examiner, October 3.
moment Donelson was held by eighteen thousand men under the command of General John B. Floyd, late Secretary of War in the cabinet of Buchanan. Next to him were Gies or wherever they could find a little protection from the wintry blasts. General Floyd, knowing that Grant's army was much River gunboats. Lying at anch the inmates but surrender or slaughter on the morrow. A council was held by Floyd, Pillow, and Buckner. Buckner, who was a master in the art of warfare, declareold his position for half an hour in the morning. The situation was hopeless. Floyd was under indictment at Washington for maladministration in the Buchanan cabineape after the flotilla of gunboats had once appeared in the river, although General Floyd, its senior commander, the former Secretary of War under President Buchananllow, and Pillow, declaring that he too would escape, passed it on to Buckner. Floyd and Pillow with their men made good their escape; so did Colonel Forrest, the c
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
llas, Mo. Losses: Union 2 killed. September 2, 1861: dry wood or Ft. Scott, Mo. Losses: Union 4 killed, 9 wounded. September 10, 1861: Carnifex Ferry, W. Va. Union, 9th, 10th, 12th, 13th, 28th, and 47th Ohio. Confed., Gen. J. B. Floyd's command. Losses: Union 17 killed, 141 wounded. Confed. No record found.. September 11, 1861: Lewinsville, Va. Union, 19th Ind., 3d Vt., 79th N. Y., 1st U. S. Chasseurs, Griffin's Battery, detachment of Cavalry. Confed., 1ded. Confed. 106 killed (estimate). October 26, 1861: Romney or Mill Creek Mills, W. Va. Union, 4th and 8th Ohio, 7th W. Va., Md. Volunteers, 2d Regt. of Potomac Home Guards and Ringgold (Pa.) Cav. Confed., Va. Vols. commanded by Gen. J. B. Floyd. Losses: Union 2 killed, 15 wounded. Confed. 20 killed, 15 wounded, 50 captured. October 26, 1861: Saratoga, Ky. Union, 9th Ill. Confed., Capt. Wilcox's Cavalry. Losses: Union 4 wounded. Confed. 8 killed, 17 wounde
ashington, April 28, 1905. Army of Kanawha The Confederate forces assigned to operate in the Kanawha valley, West Virginia, were placed under the command of Brigadier-General John B. Floyd on August 11, 1861, and denominated the Army of the Kanawha. This force and one under Brigadier-General Henry A. Wise were its chief constituents. The troops took part in the engagement at Carnifex Ferry. The strength of the command was about thirty-five hundred. Some of the troops were sent with Floyd to the Central Army of Kentucky, early in 1862, and formed one of its divisions. Several of the regiments were captured at Fort Donelson when this post capitulated to General Grant. Confederate generals--no. 1 Alabama This is the first of 25 groups embracing representative general officers of 14 States. On preceding pages of this volume appear portraits of all generals and lieutenant-generals, all generals killed in battle, also commanders of armies and army corps. Many appea
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