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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 8 (search)
n order to reap the fruits of our victory the pursuit should be most vigorous. I must urge you then again to press on his rear, rapidly and steadily. We must lose no more time or he will escape us entirely. This note had also a postscript which will be quoted presently in another connection. Magruder had only brought into action two brigades,— Kershaw's and Semmes's, —and a half of Barksdale's. The force engaged against him had been Sumner's corps, and Smith's division of Franklin's. Heintzelman's corps had also been present in the morning, but in the afternoon it had crossed White Oak Swamp at Brackett's Ford. The remaining nine Federal brigades were, doubtless, too heavy a task for Magruder with only six, but had Jackson with his 14 brigades been present in the morning, the enemy should have been routed. Doubtless Magruder should have employed twice the force he did engage, and taken chances. His two and a half brigades were overmatched, though they fought until dark, losing
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 10: Cedar Mountain (search)
able lines of retreat of our opponents and leave our own to take care of themselves. . . . Success and glory are in the advance. Disaster and shame lurk in the rear. . . . The arrogance of this address was not calculated to impress favorably officers of greater experience in actual warfare, who were now overslaughed by his promotion. McDowell would have been the fittest selection, but he and Banks, both seniors to Pope, submitted without a word; as did also Sumner, Franklin, Porter, Heintzelman, and all the major-generals of McClellan's army. But Fremont protested, asked to be relieved, and practically retired from active service. Meanwhile, after the discomfiture of McClellan, Mr. Lincoln felt the want of a military advisor, and, on July 11, appointed Gen. Halleck commander-in-chief of all the armies of the United States, and summoned him to Washington City. Ropes's Story of the civil War thus comments upon this appointment: — It is easy to see how this unfortunate sel
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 11: second Manassas (search)
n his place, might have cut loose from his base and marched upon Richmond, leaving Lee to wreck his army on the fortified lines around Washington, but Pope was no Napoleon. When he realized the situation, however, his first orders were very judicious, a safer play if less brilliant than a Napoleonic advance upon Richmond would have been. He ordered the two corps of Mc-Dowell and Sigel, with Reynolds's division, about 40,000 men, to Gainesville. In support of them, to Greenwich, he sent Heintzelman with three divisions. Hooker was sent to Bristoe to attack Ewell, with Porter marching to support him. Banks, in the rear, protected the trains. The best part of all of these orders was the occupation of Gainesville with a strong force, for Gainesville was directly between Jackson and Longstreet. It behooved Pope to prevent any possible junction between these two, and now on the night of the 27th at Gainesville he held the key to the whole position. But, unfortunately for Pope, as y
mmand. 3. A third department, called the Department of Pennsylvania, will include that State, the State of Delaware, and all of Maryland not embraced in the forgoing departments. Major-General Patterson to command; Headquarters at Philadelphia, or any other point he may temporarily occupy. 4. Brevet-Colonel C. F. Smith having been relieved by Colonel Mansfield, will repair to Fort Columbus, N. Y., and assume the duties of Superintendent of the Recruiting Service, to which he was assigned in Special Orders No. 80, of March 15. Major Heintzelman, on being relieved at Fort Columbus, will repair to this city, and report for duty to the Department Commander. 5. Fort Adams, Rhode Island, is hereby placed temporarily under the control of the Secretary of the Navy, for the purpose of the Naval Academy now at Annapolis, Md. The necessary transfer of property will be made by the departments interested. By order. L. Thomas, Adjutant-General. --National Intelligencer, May 1.
the lines, to be ready to move at a moment's notice. At a very early hour in the morning of the 21st, Hunter's and Heintzelman's divisions of McDowell's army, over sixteen thousand strong, moved forward from Centreville by the Warrenton turnpikesue, which thus nerved and animated one and all to stand unawed and unshrinking in such extremity. Two brigades of Heintzelman's division, with Ricketts's light battery of six 10-pounder rifled guns, now opened fire on Imboden's command, which ht-equipped men that ever took the field —according to their own history of the day—was formed of Colonels Hunter's and Heintzelman's divisions, Colonels Sherman's and Keyes's brigades of Tyler's division, and the formidable batteries of Ricketts, Grut still afford us data for an approximate estimate. Left almost in the dark in respect to the losses of Hunter's and Heintzelman's divisions— first, longest, and most hotly engaged—we are informed that Sherman's brigade, Tyler's division, suffere
at it was not immediately removed by the appearance of the field. I judged so, at least, from his first words, while we were shaking hands: How has the battle gone? In Alfriend's Life of Jefferson Davis it is asserted (p. 305) that the President reached the battle-field while the struggle was still in progress; that to the troops his name and bearing were the symbols of victory; that while the victory was assured, but by no means complete, he urged that the enemy, still on the field (Heintzelman's troops, as subsequently appeared), be warmly pursued, as was successfully done (p. 313). These are fancies, says General Johnston. He arrived upon the field after the last-armed enemy had left it, when none were within cannon-shot, or south of Bull Run, when the victory was complete as well as assured, and no opportunity left for the influence of his name and bearing. General Beauregard, in his report, also alludes to the arrival of Mr. Davis on the battle-field of Manassas, just
f two strong brigades, was in the advance, followed immediately by another division under Colonel Heintzelman, of three brigades and seven companies of Regular cavalry, and twenty-four pieces of artited one and all to stand unawed and unshrinking in such extremity. The Federal brigades of Heintzelman's division were now brought into action, led by Pickett's superb light battery of six 10-pounry, four companies of marines, and twenty pieces of artillery. See official reports of Colonels Heintzelman, Porter, and Burnside. Against this odds, scarcely credible, our advance position was stiield, according to their own official history of the day, was formed of Colonels Hunter's and Heintzelman's divisions, Sherman's and Keyes's brigades of Tyler's division, and of the formidable batterr an approximate estimate. Left almost in the dark, in respect to the losses of Hunter's and Heintzelman's divisions—first, longest, and most hotly engaged— we are informed Sherman's brigade, Tyler'
for Washington, D. C., June 5. Attached to Howard's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeastern Virginia, to August,ivision of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Sedgwick's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade,for Washington, D. C., June 20. Attached to Howard's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeastern Virginia, to August, 1861. Heintzelman's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Sedgwick's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the PotomaHeintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Cfor Washington, D. C., June 26. Attached to Howard's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeastern Virginia, to August, 1861. Heintzelman's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1862. Slocum's Brigade, Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac, to
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
ervices to the government April 15, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., April 21, and there mustered in for three months May 1. Moved to Alexandria, Va., May 25. Duty at Camp Andrew till July 16. Attached to Franklin's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21. Battle of Bull Run July 21. Ordered to Boston July 29, and there mustered out August 1, 1861. Lost during service 9 Enlisted men killed and moounded and 1 Officer and 55 Enlisted men by disease. Total 190. 11th Massachusetts Regiment Infantry. Organized at Readville and mustered in June 13, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., June 24. Attached to Franklin's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia, to August, 1861. Hooker's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. 1st Brigade, Hooker's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Army
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
., May 13. Occupation of Arlington Heights, Va., May 24. Attached to Willcox's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeast Virginia. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. Richardson's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Richardson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps61. Richardson's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861, Richardson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 3rd Army CorpsJune 20, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., June 26. Attached to Wilcox's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, McDowell's Army of Northeastern Virginia, to August, 1861. Sherman's Brigade, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., September 11. Attached to Richardson's Brigade, Heintzelman's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Berry's 3rd Brigade, Kearny's 3rd Divisio
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