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T. Maccius Plautus, Bacchides, or The Twin Sisters (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 18 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Persians (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin). You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

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Isocrates, Areopagiticus (ed. George Norlin), section 66 (search)
Yes, and who of my own generation does not remember that the democracy so adorned the city with temples and public buildings that even today visitors from other lands consider that she is worthy to rule not only over Hellas but over all the world;In almost the same terms he praises Pericles for his adornment of Athens, Isoc. 15.234. while the Thirty neglected the public buildings, plundered the temples, and sold for destruction for the sum of three talents the dockyardsThe bitterest denunciation of the misrule of the Thirty is in the oration Against Eratosthenes, by Lysias (Lys. 12). At its close, he speaks of the sacrilege of the Thirty, particularly in selling off the treasures stored in the temples, and of their tearing down the dockyards of the Piraeus. upon which the city had spent not less than a thousand talen
Isocrates, Areopagiticus (ed. George Norlin), section 67 (search)
or when the Thirty took over the city, by vote of the Assembly,Under duress. See Xen. Hell. 2.3.2. they put to death fifteen hundred AtheniansThe same number is given in Isoc. 20.11. without a trial and compelled more than five thousand to leave Athens and take refuge in the Piraeus,Only those enjoyed the franchise under the Thirty who were in the catalogue of the approved “three thousand.” See Isoc. 18.17. whereas when the exiles overcame them and returned to Athens under arms, these put to dusand to leave Athens and take refuge in the Piraeus,Only those enjoyed the franchise under the Thirty who were in the catalogue of the approved “three thousand.” See Isoc. 18.17. whereas when the exiles overcame them and returned to Athens under arms, these put to death only the chief perpetrators of their wrongs and dealt so generously and so justly by the restCf. Plat. Menex. 243e. that those who had driven the citizens from their homes fared no worse than those who had returned from
Isocrates, Areopagiticus (ed. George Norlin), section 78 (search)
If we continue to govern Athens as we are now doing, then we are doomed to go on deliberating and waging war and living and faring and acting in almost every respect just as we do at the present moment and have done in the past; but if we effect a change of polity, it is evident by the same reasoning that such conditions of life as our ancestors enjoyed will come about for us also; for from the same political institutions there must always spring like or similar ways of life.
Isocrates, Areopagiticus (ed. George Norlin), section 80 (search)
Well then, the Hellenes felt such confidence in those who governed the city in those times that most of them of their own accord placed themselves under the power of Athens,Cf. Isoc. 8.76. while the barbarians were so far from meddling in the affairs of the Hellenes that they neither sailed their ships-of-war this side of the Phaselis nor marched their armies beyond the Halys River, refraining, on the contrary, from all aggression.See Isoc. 4.118 and note; Isoc. 12.59.
Isocrates, Areopagiticus (ed. George Norlin), section 81 (search)
Today, however, circumstances are so completely reversed that the Hellenes regard Athens with hatred and the barbarians hold us in contempt. As to the hatred of us among the Hellenes, you have heard the report of our generalsHe speaks as though addressing an actual assembly which had received reports from the generals and dispatches from the King of Persia. See Introduction, close. themselves, and what the King thinks of us, he has made plain in the letters which have been dispatched by him.Threatening dispatches sent to the Athenians because Chares had supported the cause of the rebel satrap Artabazus. See 8, note.
Isocrates, Areopagiticus (ed. George Norlin), section 83 (search)
But the greatest difference lies in the fact that in that day no one of the citizens lacked the necessaries of life nor shamed the city by begging from passers-by, whereas today those who are destitute of means outnumber those who possess them.An exaggeration, but Isocrates dwells upon the poverty of Athens in the Isoc. 8.also. And we may well be patient with people in such circumstances if they care nothing for the public welfare, but consider only how they may live from day to day.
Isocrates, Areopagiticus (ed. George Norlin), section 84 (search)
Now I have come before you and spoken this discourse, believing that if we will only imitate our ancestors we shall both deliver ourselves from our present ills and become the saviors, not of Athens alone, but of all the Hellenes;See General Introduction p. xxxii. but it is for you to weigh all that I have said and cast your votes according to your judgement of what is best for Athens.Now I have come before you and spoken this discourse, believing that if we will only imitate our ancestors we shall both deliver ourselves from our present ills and become the saviors, not of Athens alone, but of all the Hellenes;See General Introduction p. xxxii. but it is for you to weigh all that I have said and cast your votes according to your judgement of what is best for Athens.
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 6 (search)
s, which developed into the Athenian Empire. During the period of supremacy, which lasted from the close of the Persian Wars to the end of the Peloponnesian War, Athens frequently disciplined recalcitrant confederate states by expelling their citizens and settling Athenians on their lands. Such settlements were called cleruchies. When Athens formed the new naval confederacy in 378 B.C. it was expressly stipulated by her allies and agreed to by Athens that such abuse of power should not be repeated. But the jingoistic orators advocated nothing less than the restoration of the former empire with all its powers and practices. while the latter hold forth nAthens that such abuse of power should not be repeated. But the jingoistic orators advocated nothing less than the restoration of the former empire with all its powers and practices. while the latter hold forth no such hope, insisting rather that we must have peace and not crave great possessions contrary to justice,The state which seizes and holds foreign possessions is a robber. Isocrates throughout this discourse proposes to make the moral code within the state the basis of her foreign policy. but be content with those we haveA prover
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 14 (search)
m being done by the state.” and that, although this is a free government, there exists no ‘freedom of speech’The pride of Athens. See Hdt. 5.78; Eur. Hipp. 422. except that which is enjoyed in this Assembly by the most reckless orators, who care notoibles of the state. These comedies were given at the festival of Dionysus, when many visitors from other states were in Athens. Aristophanes himself says (Aristoph. Ach. 500 ff.) that he was attacked by Cleon for “abusing Athens in the presence ofAthens in the presence of strangers.” And, what is most outrageous of all, you show greater favor to those who publish the failings of Athens to the rest of the Hellenes than you show even to those who benefit the city, while you are as ill-disposed to those who rebuke and aAthens to the rest of the Hellenes than you show even to those who benefit the city, while you are as ill-disposed to those who rebuke and admonish youIsocrates resents their attitude towards himself in the opening remarks of the Antidosis (Isoc. 15). as you are to men who work inj
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 17 (search)
But if I leave off speaking at this point, I know that I shall appear to put Athens at a disadvantage, if, that is to say, the Thebans are to retain possession of Thespiae and PlataeaSee Isoc. 6.27, note. and the other citiesOrchomenus (Dio. Sic. 15.79), Oropus (Dio. Sic. 15.76). which they have seized contrary to their oaths,When they agreed to the Peace of Antalcidas. while we are to retire, under no compulsion to do so, from the territory which we now hold. But if you will only listen to me and give me your attention to the end, I believe that you will all impute extreme folly and madness to those who think that injustice is advantageous and who would hold in subjection by force the cities of others, failing to reckon with the disasters which result from such a
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