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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 2 0 Browse Search
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ent of supplies to Amelia Court House, 570-72. Report on commissary after Lee's surrender. 578-79. St. Lawrence (frigate), 165, 166. St. Louis (gunboat), 25. Sallie (ship), 237. San Francisco (steamer), 266. Santissima Trinidad (ship), 234. Satellite (gunboat), 188. Savannah, Ga. Harbor defense, 172. Investment and evacuation, 484-85. Savannah (ship), 9, 494. Schade, Louis, 418. Schenck, General, 97. establishment of martial law in western Maryland, 389. Schofield, General, 475, 488, 489, 534, 537, 540, 548, 592, 613, 618, 619, 621. Schopf, —, 16, 17, 18, 19. Scott, Colonel, 37, 95. Gen. Winfield, 15, 104, 495, 515. Sea King (ship), 221. Secession, 3. Division of Southern sentiment, 4. Sectional rivalry, 12. Acquisition of power by one section, cause of trouble, not slavery, 136-37. Seddon, J. A., 339, 345, 418, 474. Sedgwick, General, 309, 310, 435-36. Selma (gunboat), 173. Semmes, General, 301, 307, 377. Admiral Raphael, 210, 235, 55
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
lle, where Thomas commanded, with an inferior force under Schofield, holding the country to the south. Pres. Davis had not iders of Gen. Cheatham, commanding one of Hood's corps. Schofield had taken position on the north side of Duck River, opposs crossing. Hood left Lee's corps to demonstrate against Schofield, while he threw a pontoon bridge across the river three m marched to Spring Hill on the Franklin pike, 12 miles in Schofield's rear, arriving about 3 P. M. This place was held by thestaff-officers, which also failed of effect. The head of Schofield's infantry arrived about nine o'clock and passed unmolese death-blow to Hood's army. On the next day, Nov. 30, Schofield took a strong position at Franklin to protect his wagon-tity of the campaign at Spring Hill the night before. For Schofield was now within a day's march of Nashville. He ordered thy withdrew from the field, leaving his dead and wounded. Schofield's losses were: killed, 189; wounded, 1033; missing, 1104;
he was afraid of him. His object now was to put himself in communication with Schofield, who had landed at Wilmington and at Newbern with a large force, and establi sea, and upon Porter's gunboats. He effected the contemplated junction with Schofield, at Goldsboroa, North Carolina, on the 21st of March. He had not touched anynt's lines, and he took no further part in the campaign. His junction with Schofield had not been effected without disaster. At Kinston, Bragg gained a victory over Schofield, utterly routing him, and taking 1500 prisoners; and at Bentonsville, Johnston checked, and gained some advantage over Sherman. As the reader is suppol now stick a pin in the point representing Goldsboroa, and throw Sherman and Schofield out of view. In the latter part of March, Sheridan, having overrun Early's cavalry. Grant's army was thus swollen to 160,000 men. Adding Sherman's and Schofield's forces of 100,000, we have 260,000. In the meantime, Lee's half-starved, r
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Arkansas Volunteers. (search)
862. Unattached Army of the Frontier, Dept. Missouri, to June, 1863. District Southwest Missouri, Dept. Missouri, to June, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Frontier Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Arkansas, to February, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. Arkansas, February, 1865. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. Arkansas, to August, 1865. Service. Regiment organizing at Cassville, Mo., till July 1, 1862. Moved to Springfield, Mo., July 1. Schofield's Campaign in Missouri and Arkansas August to December. 1st Battalion with Gen. Blunt and engaged near Newtonia September 15. Skirmish at Cassville September 21. Near Newtonia October 13 (1st Battalion). 2nd Battalion joins Army of the Frontier October 3. 1st and 2nd Battalions lead advance of Army during October. Stationed at Elkhorn Tavern and Cassville October 20 as outpost for 2nd and 3rd Divisions, Army of the Frontier. Huntsville November 5. Yocum Creek, Mo., No
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
, to August, and Dept. of the Gulf, to June, 1864. District of LaFourche, Dept. of the Gulf, to February, 1865. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 16th Army Corps (New), Military Division Dept. West Mississippi, to August, 1865. Dept. of Mississippi to January, 1866. Service. Fremont's advance on Springfield, Mo., September 22-November 3, 1861. Duty at Sedalia, Mo., guarding Pacific Railroad till July, 1862. Near Shiloh, Mo., April 11 (Detachment). Moved to Springfield, Mo. Schofield's campaign and operations in Southwest Missouri till December. Occupation of Newtonia October 4. Advance on Fayetteville October 11-December 3. March to relief of Gen. Blount December 3-6. Battle of Prairie Grove, Ark., December 7. At Fayetteville till December 27. Expedition over Boston Mountains to Van Buren, Ark., December 27-29. Capture of Van Buren December 29. Duty at various points in Southwest Missouri till June. Ordered to Vicksburg, Miss., June 3. Si
, United States Forces, Texas, Dept. of the Gulf, to August, 1864. United States Forces, Mobile Bay, Dept. of the Gulf, to September, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 19th Corps, Dept. of the Gulf, to December, 1864. 4th Brigade, Reserve Corps, Military Division Dept. West Mississippi, to February, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Reserve Corps, February, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 13th Army Corps, Military Division Dept. West Mississippi, to July, 1865. Service. Schofield's Campaign in Southwest Missouri October, 1862, to January, 1863. Occupation of Newtonia October 4. Battle of Prairie Grove, Ark., December 7. March over Boston Mountains to Van Buren, Ark., December 27-31. March to Huntsville, Ark., January 2-18, 1863, to Elk Creek January 22-February 15, and to St. Louis, arriving April 24. Guard Arsenal till May 15. (Cos. A and F at Defence of Cape Girardeau.) At Pilot Knob till June 3. Moved to St. Genevieve June 3, and to Vicksbur
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
ed at St. Louis, Mo., November 1, 1861. Assigned to Curtis Horse, 5th Iowa Cavalry, as Company M, December, 1861. Schofield's Hussars. See 13th Missouri State Militia Cavalry, Company I. Soboleski's Independent Company Rangers. Organid to Jefferson City August 16, to Sedalia August 18, and to Springfield August 26. Action at Lone Jack August 16. Schofield's Campaign in Southwest Missouri October, 1862, to January, 1863. Occupation of Newtonia October 4, 1862. Battle at St. Louis, Mo., till January, 1862, when disbanded. Battery reorganized October, 1862, by assignment of Battery A, Schofield's Light Artillery. Attached to 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Army of the Frontier, Dept. of Missouri, to June, 1863. service see that Battery. Pfenninghaussen's Battery Light Artillery See Landgraeber's Battery Light Artillery. Schofield's Battery a, Light Artillery Organized at St. Louis, Mo., July 25, 1862. Attached to Dept. of Missouri to October
eral Sickles. 8. General Heintzelman. 9. General Sherman. 10. General Rosecrans. 11. General Logan. 12. General Howard. 13. General Slocum. 14. General Robert McCOOK. 15. General McCLERNAND. 16. Lieutenant-General Scott 17. General Halleck. 1S. General Dix. 19. General Casey. 20. General Franklin. 21. General Buell. 22. General shields. 23. General McCLELLAN. 24. General Foster. 25. General Terry. 26. General Sykes. 27. General Gillmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. Gene
eral Sickles. 8. General Heintzelman. 9. General Sherman. 10. General Rosecrans. 11. General Logan. 12. General Howard. 13. General Slocum. 14. General Robert McCOOK. 15. General McCLERNAND. 16. Lieutenant-General Scott 17. General Halleck. 1S. General Dix. 19. General Casey. 20. General Franklin. 21. General Buell. 22. General shields. 23. General McCLELLAN. 24. General Foster. 25. General Terry. 26. General Sykes. 27. General Gillmore. 28. General Wallace. 29. General Garfield. 30. General Schofield. 31. General Sheridan. 32. General Kilpatrick 33. General Custer 34. General Buford 35. General Merritt 36. General Averill 37. General Torbert. 38. General Sedgwick. 39. General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. Gene
Kilpatrick's command, and when General Sherman reached Cheraw, was sent to carry despatches to Wilmington which was then occupied by the Union troops under Generals Schofield and Terry. The journey was a perilous one, as he descended Cape Fear river from the mouth of Rockfish creek, a distance of more than a hundred miles, in anaving reached Wilmington in safety and delivered his despatches, he was immediately requested to carry despatches also to Newbern and Kinston, where he found General Schofield. Three hours after the delivery of these, General Schofield entrusted him with a despatch for General Sherman which he wished taken across the country. He sGeneral Schofield entrusted him with a despatch for General Sherman which he wished taken across the country. He started immediately, and after a long and somewhat dangerous tramp (for he could only go on foot in safety), he reached the general near Faison's depot. After the battle of Bentonville he applied for and received his discharge, having been in the service seven months over the time for which he had enlisted, and on the 1st of April,
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