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ent to support a hard-pressed part of the line. In many instances they assumed to be clothed with authority to order a regiment from its own brigade to another. The consequence was that in a few hours after the opening of the battle the efficiency of the troops was seriously affected, and some of them were made the victims of great injustice. The retirement to Corinth was made in good order. No pursuit was made or attempted. General Beauregard reports the Confederate loss at 10,699. Swinton fixes the loss of Grant and Buell in killed, wounded and captured, at 15,000. In May, 1862, Colonel Lowe, afterward brigadiergen-eral, commanding the Federal forces at Forts Henry and Heiman, sent out an expedition in the direction of Paris and Dresden, for the capture of medical supplies reported to have been forwarded from Paducah to the Confederate army. The expedition, consisting of three companies of cavalry, was commanded by Maj. Carl Shaeffer de Boernstein. Col. Thomas Claiborne,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
riotism that recked nothing of consequence. Our programme is not yet definitely arranged, but we are purposing another tour very soon, when we can ask nothing more than that we may meet with like treatment and success. Literary notices. Swinton's Army of the Potomac, revised by the author, and reissued by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. We are indebted to the publishers for this admirable edition of a book which has long been noted for its real ability, and whose author Presidention and death. Again and again they charged, until upon this little spot, it was like unto the fire of hell, and amid the crashing rain of leaden missiles, severing soul from body, the brave little garrison was overwhelmed and taken prisoners. Swinton says out of 200 souls in Gregg, but thirty lived to be taken, and the victory cost the Federals dear, as the defendants had killed three to one of the assailants, and our retreat began—marching, starving, hopeless, yet still fighting and keeping
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
Literary notices. Swinton's Army of the Potomac, revised by the author, and reissued by Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. We are indebted to the publishers for this admirable edition of a book which has long been noted for its real ability, and whose author President Davis justly pronounces the fairest and most careful of the Northern writers on the war. We expect to have hereafter a full review of the book, and to point out some very serious errors into which the author has fallen; but meantime we advise our friends to buy the book. The publishers, J. R. Osgood & Co., Boston, have sent us a copy of their beautifully gotten up memoir of Admiral John A. Dahlgren, by his widow, Mrs. M. V. Dahlgren. The book is largely autobiographical, as it quotes fully from the diaries, letters, etc., of the distinguished Admiral, and touches on many matters of deepest interest, and historic importance, to which we shall hereafter give attention. The Bivouac, Louisville, Ky., for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
Petersburg, was defended by 150 Mississippians, of Harris's brigade, and two guns of the Washington Artillery, under the intrepid McElroy. The Federals, 5,000 strong, under Gibbon, attacked, and were thrice driven back by our messengers of destruction and death. Again and again they charged, until upon this little spot, it was like unto the fire of hell, and amid the crashing rain of leaden missiles, severing soul from body, the brave little garrison was overwhelmed and taken prisoners. Swinton says out of 200 souls in Gregg, but thirty lived to be taken, and the victory cost the Federals dear, as the defendants had killed three to one of the assailants, and our retreat began—marching, starving, hopeless, yet still fighting and keeping the enemy at bay, till in the forenoon of April 9, our beloved commander, the glorious Lee, laid down his arms at Appomattox Courthouse. His simple words are graven on our hearts: Men, we have fought through the war together. I have done the best
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
again in his pathway, and continued to anticipate his movements until the lines of both armies crossed the famous field of Cold Harbor. Here, on June 3d, Grant having been joined by 16,000 or 18,000 of Butler's troops, made the most bloody and disastrous of his assaults upon the Confederate army. His assault was general, but he was everywhere repulsed with great slaughter, and at comparatively trifling cost to the Confederates. Nearly 6,000 Federal troops, according to General Humphreys (Swinton makes the loss twice as great), fell in this assault, while the Confederate loss was probably not as many hundreds. General Grant's Medical Director puts the Federal loss from the crossing of the Pamunkey to June 12th at over 14,000 men. So fearful was the carnage on June 3d that the Federal lines when ordered to renew the conflict refused to do it. This ended the campaign against Richmond from the north side of the James, and ten days later the Federal army was on its march to try the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
id not again see General Hill's body, which was brought to Venable's by a route still further to our rear, having, with the staff and couriers of the Third corps, been ordered to General Longstreet, who soon became very actively engaged. I learned that the ball struck the General's pistol hand and then penetrated his body just over the heart. Captain Frank Hill, aidede-camp (and nephew) to the General, in charge, and Courier Jenkins were of the party detailed to escort the body, with Mrs. Hill and her children, to a Mr. Hill's, near the banks of James river, in Chesterfield county, where the General's body was temporarily buried and afterwards removed to Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia. Thus closed the career of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill, of whom Swinton, in his excellent book, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, says: Who, in all the operations that from first to last filled up the four years defense of the Confederate capital, had borne a most distinguished part.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and the Monitor—Report of the Committee on Naval Affairs. (search)
n order to avert the damages of another attack from the enemy's iron-clad, they hastened to station several large vessels at the mouth of the James River, which were to board the Virginia (Merrimac) and sink her as soon as she should appear. Swinton, another authority referred to, in his Twelve Decisive Battles of the War, gives no facts which sustain the theory of this application. On page 249 he says: Even the Monitor's 11-inch ordnance, though it told heavily against the casemate ofA few well-depressed shots rang against the cuirass of the Merrimac, and the latter despairing of subduing her eager and obstinate antagonist, after four hours of fierce effort, abandoned the fight, &c. The gist of the whole argument which Mr. Swinton makes is, not that the Monitor had seriously injured the Merrimac, but that the latter, powerful as she had proven to be, was unable to penetrate the Monitor with her shots, or to seriously injure her with her prow. It is not denied that th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ceremonies connected with the unveiling of the statue of General Robert E. Lee, at Lee circle, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 22, 1884. (search)
aggregate engaged in the campaign to one hundred and ninety-two thousand men, while Lee had received but fourteen thousand reinforcement. Lee had so managed his inferior force as to confront his adversary at every halt and to be ready for battle whenever offered. Such skill had he displayed in the selection of his positions and the disposition of his troops that he repulsed every assault, won every battle and forced his adversary to retire from every field. According to the authority of Swinton, the Federal historian, Grant had lost sixty thousand men, a number nearly equal to the entire force of his opponent. And what had the Federal commander accomplished? He had reached a point on the James River, the water route to Richmond always open, where, in much less time and without the loss of a man, he might have established himself at the opening of the campaign. The siege of Petersburg! How shall I commemorate it? How shall I do justice to the heroism displayed in the defence
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First Maryland campaign. (search)
character as a commander, and by the sensitiveness of the Federal Government in regard to Washington. This expectation was defeated by the loss of the dispatch containing General Lee's plans, and, we believe, by this alone. General Longstreet seems to think that only Virginian writers consider this dispatch of great importance. We believe that Generals Longstreet and D. H. Hill are the only two people who refuse to see the decisive importance of the lost dispatch upon the campaign. (See Swinton, Comte de Paris, Palfrey, &c.) General Lee, we know, thought it the most important factor in the campaign. It changed all his plans and, as he believed, the result. A single day of delay on McClellan's part at South Mountain would probably have rendered the battle at this barrier unnecessary. Two days delay would certainly have relieved Lee from all necessity of defending the passes, and would have rendered possible the concentration of his army anywhere in the Hagerstown Valley in time
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Virginia division of Army of Northern Virginia, at their reunion on the evening of October 21, 1886. (search)
ern Virginia did even greater wonders after this conversation, for it fought through Grant's campaign of 1864 in which it placed hors de combat a number of the enemy equal to its entire numerical strength at the commencement of the campaign. Swinton says: Grant's loss in the series of actions from the Wilderness to the Chickahominy reached the enormous aggregate of sixty thousand men put hors de combat—a number greater than the entire strength of Lee's army at the opening of the campaign. etween Richmond and the Union army, and conscious of the terrible price in blood they had exacted from the latter, were in high spirit, and the morale of Lee's army was never better than after the battle of Cold Harbor. See Army of the Potomac, Swinton, pages 491, 492. Four Years with General Lee, Taylor, page 135. Southern Historical Papers, General C. M. Wilcox. page 75. But General Humphreys, in his Virginia Campaign of ‘64 and ‘65, putting our forces at 61,953 at the commencement of the<
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