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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter army life and camp drill (search)
would if they were composed of anything but pork. January 21, 1863 Being so near Georgia, I have thought it best to be provided with the summer costume attributed to Georgians — a shirt collar and a pair of spurs; and have accordingly purchased both those articles. January 23 saw Colonel Higginson in command of three vessels, bound on a foraging trip up the St. Mary's River. This expedition was fully described in Army life. After his return he wrote: . . . Do you know at Fernandina I tea'd with three schoolmistresses and it is quite bewildering; I had forgotten that there were so many women in the world. . . . Here I never see a white woman, save two Irish lieutenantesses. Camp Saxton, February 24 Our army does not seem to me as vivacious as many suppose, but slouchy and slovenly, ill-kept and ill-handled. In this respect the navy is far superior to it; there is a universal neatness and discipline which forms a refreshing contrast. Water is a cleaner element, t
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, The woman's rights movement and its champions in the United States. (search)
usiness, she took the post of assistant editor of an agricultural paper in Columbus, Ohio; but as the breaking out of the war soon destroyed the circulation of the paper, and four of her sons had gone into the army, her thoughts turned to the scenes of conflict in the Southern States. The suffering freedmen and the boys in blue appealed alike to her loving heart for kindness and help; and, without appointment or salary, she went to Port Royal in 1862. She remained in Beaufort, Paris, and Fernandina thirteen months, ministering alike to the soldiers and freedmen, as opportunity offered. Pages might be written on the heroism of Mrs. Gage and her daughter Mary during this period. Oppressed with the magnitude of the work to be accomplished there, she returned North, to give her experiences acquired among the freedmen, hoping to rouse others, younger and stronger than herself, to go down and teach those neglected people the A B C of learning and social life. During this year she trav
policy of the Confederates throughout the war was to abstain from all serious attempts to retake points within reach of the salt water, where the navy held control, but rather to let go what was lost and confine themselves to interior lines, where they were strong. They were willing to have it understood that they menaced such points, and New Orleans most of all, but there is no reason to suppose that they had any serious purpose of retaking it, any more than of recapturing Port Royal or Fernandina. It appears from the Confederate correspondence in Official War Records that there were from time to time propositions of this kind from hot-headed officers, as Gens. John M. Huger and David Ruggles, but that these were uniformly repressed by General Beauregard on the simple ground that the gunboats made it absolutely impossible. So long as the enemy has command of the river with his gunboats, the recovery of New Orleans must depend upon our taking St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, Wash
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, chapter 2 (search)
many islands, thickly peopled, of which I took possession, without resistance, in the name of our most illustrious Monarch, by public proclamation and with unfurled banners. To the first of these islands, which is called by the Indians Guanahani, I gave the name of the blessed Saviour (San Salvador), relying upon whose protection I had reached this as well as the other islands. To each of these I also gave a name, ordering that one should be called Santa Maria de la Concepcion; another, Fernandina; the third, Isabella; the fourth, Juana; and so with all the rest respectively. As soon as we arrived at that, which, as I have said, was named Juana, Cuba. I proceeded along its coast a short distance westward, and found it to be so large, and apparently without termination, that I could not suppose it to be an island, but the continental province of Cathay. Or Tartary. Seeing, however, no towns or populous places on the seacoast, but only a few detached houses and cottages, with w
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, I. List of officers from Massachusetts in United States Navy, 1861 to 1865. (search)
, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Ensign. Apr. 7, 1864.Actg. Ensign. Childs, Calvin C.,Mass.Mass.Apr. 5, 1862.Actg. Master.Fernandina.South Atlantic.Oct. 30, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Master. Childs, John D.,Mass.Mass.Mass.Dec. 20, 1861.Actg. Master.Vy 17, 1865.Resigned.Mate. Hines, Richard B., Credit. Boston.Mass.Mass.Mass.Feb. 6, 1862.Actg. Master's Mate.Sebago; Fernandina; Vermont.South Atlantic.Feb. 7, 1866.Hon. discharged.Actg. Master. May 26, 1862.Actg. Master. Officers from Massacssissippi.Oct. 10, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Asst. Surgeon. Sawyer, Charles,Mass.Mass.Mass.Aug. 29, 1864.Actg. Ensign.Fernandina.East Gulf.Dec. 25, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Ensign. Scott, William,-Mass.Mass.Aug. 8, 1863.Actg. Gunner.Cambridge.NoSeamans, Henry G., Credit, Boston. See enlistment, Feb. 26, 1862.Norway.Mass.Mass.Oct. 24, 1862.Actg. Master's Mate.Fernandina; Kingfisher. Lehigh; Catskill; Oleander.East Gulf. South Atlantic.Aug. 12, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Ensign. July 1,
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
titution and elected General John McIntosh governor. Colonel Ashley was appointed commander of the military forces. The patriots, as they were called, aided by American gunboats, demanded from Don Jose Lopez the surrender of Amelia Island and Fernandina. The capitulation was made March 17, 1812, to General John McIntosh, who claimed to be governor of the independent State of Florida. March 19th, General McIntosh, as governor of Florida, surrendered the post to General Matthews. Lieutenant Ridgely, of the United States army, with a force of United States troops, was placed in command. Fernandina had been for some time past a depot for neutral trade and a port for smugglers avoiding the commercial restrictions. The patriot army, numbering about 300 men, now marched to attack St. Augustine. Here they were repulsed by Governor Estrada and retreated to the St. Johns. When these proceedings became known at Washington, the Spanish and British ministers protested against them. The Un
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
om the armies had returned, new recruits had come in, the short term regiments had re-enlisted, and the general spirit of the army and the people improved. One event scarcely known, however, throughout the Confederacy, was the enforced abandonment by the direction of the war department, of all lower Florida. The State had enjoyed a general exemption from invasion until the naval expeditions under Dupont resulted in the capture of the towns on the Atlantic side with little resistance. Fernandina, Jacksonville and St. Augustine fell into the hands of the United States. Finally the entire coast of Florida was under Federal control. The war department removed munitions from the State and transferred the troops to Tennessee. A singular scheme for the armed colonization of this State is described by a Federal authority of that date and is here reproduced to show the extent to which it was then supposed that the United States government might exercise the power of subjugation. A s
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
is A. and Theo H. (Chisholm) Beckham. His father was a planter and served in the legislature of the State. Major Beckham was educated at the Citadel academy, Charleston, and then became the representative of a Charleston shipping company at Fernandina, Fla. Returning to his home in 1860 on the occasion of his father's death, he remained on account of the exciting war spirit, and enlisted in the Calhoun Guards, a company of the Sixth volunteer regiment. After duty at Charleston harbor and on th medical examiners, is now chairman of the State board of health, and was a member of the conference at Montgomery, Ala., of yellow fever experts, of 1889. He was city dispensary physician during the yellow fever epidemic of 1871-73, served at Fernandina during the scourge of 1877, and at Memphis in the following year, and was medical director pro tem. of the Howard medical corps. His contributions to medical literature, especially in the fields of sanitation and quarantine, are of great valu
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ntenable, and the guns were disabled. The island of Hilton Head was abandoned, the Georgia battery losing its guns. Fort Beauregard was also evacuated, and the enemy thus gained a permanent base for naval action. Tattnall, however, brought off his mosquito fleet in safety. The Federal light-draught gunboats were soon flitting through the passages of the island-fringed coast of Georgia, and expeditions were sent through Ossabaw, Warsaw, St. Helena and Cumberland sounds, as far down as Fernandina, rapidly gaining possession of the whole coast line except the entrance to Savannah harbor. These scouting vessels did not venture to attack Fort Pulaski, but landed a force of men on Tybee island on the 24th of November, after shelling the martello tower and battery, which had been abandoned some two weeks before. Captain Read, with a detachment of his command, crossed over to the island after dark to burn the hospital, but found the enemy too numerous. Learning that the Federals were
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
ate his resources for defense, General Lee authorized General Mercer, in command at Brunswick, to remove the batteries from St. Simon's and Jekyl islands, if he considered those positions difficult to maintain, and forward the heavy guns to Savannah. It appeared that there were now no inhabitants at Brunswick, and the planters on the island had removed their property to the interior. On February 16th General Mercer reported that he had moved the guns and was shipping them to Savannah and Fernandina. The Fourth Georgia battalion was then stationed at Brunswick, as was also Col. Cary W. Styles' command, the Twenty-sixth regiment, but both were at once withdrawn. General Mercer also urged that he be given orders to burn the town of Brunswick, for the moral effect it would produce upon the enemy, as evidencing our determination to continue the present contest with unconquerable determination and at every sacrifice. At this critical moment, while the chief seaport of the State was
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