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oyed. On Sunday last, a small party of Confederates, about fifty in number, succeeded in crossing the Cumberland river, on this side of the shoals, and three of the number were captured and brought in yesterday. They claim that the whole party deserted the rebel lines, and were making their way home. One prisoner was captured yesterday and four deserters came in. The latter report Hood as being about to make a movement of some sort. General Cooper's brigade, on the march from Johnsonville to Clarksville, were terribly harassed by guerrillas. Sixteen men of the One Hundred and Thirtieth Indiana were captured, and thirteen killed and wounded. Hostilities may be said to have ceased on account of the weather. Deserters who have come in say the rebels have strong entrenchments, with wires stretched around them. Colonel Lewis Johnson, instead of Colonel G. M. S. Johnson, commanding Forty-fourth colored infantry, has received from the general commanding the highest pr
little impaired, and trains are running up to Spring Hill; but two small bridges destroyed. Trains were to run to Murfreesboro' on Sunday. Telegraph communication is all right with all points; but two small trestles are destroyed on the Johnsonville road. Johnsonville itself was not destroyed. Hood has a pontoon above the shoals on the Tennessee river, where our gunboats cannot reach them. The correspondent of the Nashville Union also gives this account of what Hood intended toJohnsonville itself was not destroyed. Hood has a pontoon above the shoals on the Tennessee river, where our gunboats cannot reach them. The correspondent of the Nashville Union also gives this account of what Hood intended to do if General Thomas had not interfered with his plans: A few days since, General Hood and some of his staff, together with Cheatham, were at the house of a gentleman with whom I conversed to-day, and who was within their lines, and while there Hood stated that he had intended at first to assault Nashville; that while he felt confident he could do so with success, he had concluded that the sacrifice would be to great unless called upon to do so as a last resort. He proposed, instead, to-b
n and Davis. A letter from Nassau, dated January 16th, states that eighteen blockade-runners were taking in cargoes of arms, ammunition, clothing and medicines for Wilmington. Eight vessels left there between the 12th and 16th to run the blockade. One vessel took four 100-pounder Armstrong guns. There were over two and a half million pounds of bacon stored at Nassau awaiting a chance to be carried through the blockade. Much of the bacon is from the Northern States, sent there to run the blockade. There were also thirty thousand Enfield rifles stored in one ware-house, belonging to the rebel Government. Over one hundred and forty men, nearly all soldiers, were killed by the boiler explosion on board the steamboat Eclipse, in the Tennessee river, near Johnsonville, on last Thursday. North Carolina has been added to the department of Sherman, and Ohio to that of Thomas. The Charlotte, Blenheim and Stagg, all blockade runners, have been captured off Wilmington.
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