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ed to Stony Point, or Nineveh, while Emory and Wright were marched to the left, and went into camp b, on the morning of the seventeenth, Crook and Wright reached Winchester and resumed the march toward Clifton; Wright, who had the rear guard, getting only as far as the Berryville crossing of the Ope for convenience of movement, to report to General Wright on its arrival at Opequan creek. I followrks. On the evening of September twentieth, Wright and Emory went into position on the heights ofar creek, the cavalry to the right and rear of Wright, and Emory extending to the back road. This ning the twenty-first. On the same day I moved Wright and Emory up in the front of the rebel line, g Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. G. Wright, Major-General Commanding. To Lieutenant- Front Royal, October 16, 1864. Major-General H. G. Wright, commanding Sixth Army Corps: Genl, I trust, do full justice to all. Generals H. G. Wright, J. B. Ricketts, Grover, Duval, E. Upt[6 more...]
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 19: Grant's overland campaign against Richmond (search)
ng away from the battle in the Wilderness, and that General H. G. Wright had succeeded to the command of Sedgwick's corps. ncock's corps from the extreme right to a position between Wright and Burnside; his impetuous and successful assault of the nt and Meade with Warren; the night transfer of Warren and Wright to the left; the rumors of Lee's retirement; the prevalency fighting, had male good his hold on Cold Harbor; that if Wright had been there to support him, they might have dispersed ant and Meade were intensely disgusted with the failure of Wright and Warren; and finally that Meade says a radical change min time to enable him to perform the part assigned to him, Wright, Smith, Warren, and Hancock had all been engaged and had stive. The order of battle from left to right was Hancock, Wright, Smith, Warren (in single line), with Burnside massed in r Hancock reported that in his front it could not be done. Wright was decidedly of opinion that a lodgement could be made in
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 20: Confederate operations in Northern Virginia (search)
. while for the want of a general purpose and a general commander to direct and concentrate the whole, it all amounted to nothing but heavy loss to ourselves. Of course there are matters about which I cannot make inquiry, ... but I know that General Wright has said to a confidential friend that all of Meade's attacks have been made without brains and without generalship. Additional light is thrown on the state of affairs treated of above by certain private notes which Dana wrote me that weehe fact that no attack had been made on either Washington or Baltimore, it reiterated the statement that nothing can possibly be done towards cutting off the enemy for want of a commander, and added that Augur commands the defences of Washington, Wright the Sixth corps, Gillmore a part of the Nineteenth corps, and Ord the Eighteenth corps, but there is no head to the whole, and it seems indispensable that you should appoint one. It then called attention to the fact that Hunter will be the ranki
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
ford, 223, 435, 436. Wilson, Henry, 153. Wilson, J. H., 201, 207, 211, 220, 222, 224, 225, 229, 278, 279, 281, 283, 285-287, 294, 304-307, 342, 344, 345, 349, 355, 356, 361, 375, 377, 385, 405. Winchester, battle of, 344. Wood, General, 262, 264, 294. Woods, General, 246. Woodstock, 21, 22. Wordsworth, 56. Wright, Elizur, 59. Wright, General H. G., 319, 320. 322-324, 334. Wright & Company, George, 9. Y. Yates, Governor, 211. Yazoo Pass, 205, 207, 209, 215, 225, 230, 231. uford, 223, 435, 436. Wilson, Henry, 153. Wilson, J. H., 201, 207, 211, 220, 222, 224, 225, 229, 278, 279, 281, 283, 285-287, 294, 304-307, 342, 344, 345, 349, 355, 356, 361, 375, 377, 385, 405. Winchester, battle of, 344. Wood, General, 262, 264, 294. Woods, General, 246. Woodstock, 21, 22. Wordsworth, 56. Wright, Elizur, 59. Wright, General H. G., 319, 320. 322-324, 334. Wright & Company, George, 9. Y. Yates, Governor, 211. Yazoo Pass, 205, 207, 209, 215, 225, 230, 231.
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 11 (search)
. Sixth Corps. First Division, Brigadier-General H. G. Wright. First Brigade, Brigadier-Generaly the left of the Sixth Corps, the division of Wright forming the connection; but, owing to the thiclved the whole of Ricketts' division, and then Wright's. But, as has been seen, it had no serious ch afforded to sacrifice the best division. General Wright succeeded to the command. During the afhin the lines of Spottsylvania, Burnside's and Wright's corps on the Union side, and Hill's corps onfederate side. Burnside left that afternoon. Wright, with the Sixth Corps, prepared to follow. Hiunity to assume the offensive, made a sally on Wright's front, and opened an attack, which, however,ing fire. As it was, he succeeded in breaking Wright's line at one place; but a heavy artillery firbreast one face of this triangle; Warren's and Wright's corps were abreast the other face. Now, whe the passage of the Chickahominy: so that when Wright and Smith arrived, it was no longer the slight[2 more...]
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 12 (search)
anding on the left bank of the James. The corps of Wright and Burnside, by an exterior route, crossed at Jonith him much booty, but little glory. Next day General Wright began pursuit, but did not overtake the enemy t at this time, temporarily under the command of General Wright—Sheridan being absent at Washington. The posce was, however, to cover the general retreat which Wright now ordered, as the only practicable means of reunifirst good position between Middletown and Newtown, Wright was able to rally and reform the troops, form a coming the arrival of Sheridan have perhaps caused General Wright to receive less credit than he really deserves.n arrived; a compact line of battle was formed, and Wright was on the point of opening the offensive. Wright Wright certainly had not the style of doing things possessed by Sheridan, but no one who knows the steady qualities oetrieved whatever his troops had lost of honor. General Wright had already brought order out of confusion and
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 13 (search)
the Appomattox to Dinwiddie Courthouse, and was in the following order: Parke, Wright, Ord, Humphreys, Warren, Sheridan. In the morning Sheridan was to cut loose frvery five yards of front. Confronting this line were the Union corps of Parke, Wright, Ord, and Humphreys. But the point of dispute was nowhere along these locked lhe Union force to break directly through the Petersburg defences. Indeed, both Wright and Ord, ascertaining from their reconnoissances the comparative nakedness of tearning the success at Five Forks, ordered an attack to be made by the corps of Wright, Parke, and Ord, the following morning. Being apprehensive, however, that Leesault was opened, from the Appomattox to Hatcher's Run, by the troops of Parke, Wright, and Ord. Parke on the right, with the Ninth Corps, carried the outer line of iund holding an inner cordon of works, from which Parke could not force them. Wright, with the Sixth Corps, next on the left of the Ninth, assaulting at four A. M.,
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, Index. (search)
ick's Ford, General Garnett defeated and killed—West Virginia campaign ended, 39. Cedar Creek, the battle of, 561; General Wright commanding in Sherdan's absence, 561; retreat of the Union army beyond Middletown, 562; Sheridan arrives in front, 56y Swamps, the army among after Fair Oaks, 140. Circle of the Hunt, 565. Cold Harbor, the battle of, 481; success of Wright and Smith, 483; positions of the two armies, 484; the Union army repulsed at every point, 485; criticism on tactics of, 4nion left (Warren's), disposition of the, 588; Lee's centre and left still intact, 600; Lee's centre assaulted by Parke, Wright, and Ord, 601; Confederates pressed back to chain of works close around, 602; the defence of Fort Gregg, 602; evacuated bill (see also Sheridan), 558. Winthrop, Major, killed at Bethel, 32. Wistar's raid to Bottom's Bridge, 398. Wright, General, at battle of Cedar Creek, 561; credit due to at battle of Cedar Creek, 563. Yellow Tavern, Sheridan's victory at
orgia troops directly to Norfolk. Scott, on the 19th of April, ordered Capt. H. G. Wright, of the engineers, to proceed to the Gosport navy yard to aid the commodo are of very great importance, Fort Monroe is still more so to the Union. Captain Wright at once proceeded on the steamer Pawnee to Fort Monroe. One of the two regioard the Pawnee, which arrived at Norfolk on the night of the 20th. When Captain Wright reached the navy yard he found that all the ships there, except the Cumberlgate Cumberland in tow of the Pawnee and a steam tug lying at the yard. To Captain Wright and Commodore Rodgers was assigned the duty of blowing up the dry dock, a mlighting the matches to fire the mine and the buildings, which was done by Captains Wright and Rodgers. The lighted fires burned so rapidly that those officers had Portsmouth side and opened fire on the yard, the steamer, and the boat in which Wright and Rodgers tried to escape. They then rowed to the Norfolk side and delivered
mended by his superior officers for bravery under all circumstances and for efficient service in carrying orders and acting with great coolness under heavy fire. He was also commended by the chief of artillery for similar services at the battles of Second Bull Run, Crampton Pass and Antietam. His service was then with the First Battery from October, 1862, till October, 1864, when its term expired. In September, 1864, he was recommended for the command of a battery by generals Sheridan, H. G. Wright (commander of Sixth Corps), James B. Ricketts, David A. Russell, and Albion P. Howe (who wrote of their personal knowledge of his services in their divisions), by Gen. George H. Getty, and Col. Tompkins, Chief of Artillery, Sixth Corps. He received a commission in the Fourth Mass. Heavy Artillery but declined it as the regiment was in the defences of Washington and he preferred active service, but accepted a commission later as second lieutenant in the Tenth it the request of Captain Sle
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