hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Garnett 137 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 124 0 Browse Search
Macon (Georgia, United States) 102 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 90 0 Browse Search
Augusta (Georgia, United States) 80 0 Browse Search
Albany (New York, United States) 72 0 Browse Search
I. Across Sherman 62 0 Browse Search
Elzey 54 50 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 42 0 Browse Search
Albert Bacon 40 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865. Search the whole document.

Found 984 total hits in 240 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
Gardiner Montgomery (search for this): chapter 3
and government officials. How strange all this seems for dear, quiet little Washington! It must be delightful there, with all those nice army officers. I am going back home as soon as I can decently change my mind. I have been at the rear all during the war, and now that I have a chance, I want to go to the front. I wish I could be here and there, too, at the same time. We were fairly besieged with visitors till time to dress for the party. Miss Pyncheon dined with us, and Gardiner Montgomery is staying in the house, and I can't tell how many other people dropped in. It was all perfectly delightful. Capt. Hobbs and Dr. Pyncheon offered themselves as escorts, but we had already made engagements with Albert Bacon and Jim Chiles. We gave Miss Pyncheon and Dr. Sloane seats in our carriage, and we six cliqued together a good deal during the evening, and had a fine time of it. I never did enjoy a party more and never had less to say about one. I had not a single adventure dur
y to be anything else-but she says he has a wife living; poor thing. We met Gen. Graves Father of John Temple Graves, the Georgia orator. at the schoolhouse andGraves, the Georgia orator. at the schoolhouse and he rode back with us. We took to the woods and jumped our horses over every log we came to, just to see what he would do. March 4, Saturday . . . I had just finished writing some letters when Gen. Graves and Mr. Baldwin This name, for obvious reasons, is fictitious. were announced and I went to the parlor. The generat last we reached home, the servants told us that Mr. and Mrs. Warren, with Gen. Graves, Mr. Baldwin, and Clint Spenser and Joe Godfrey from Albany, had come over teven, between showers, and got to the Warrens' just before the storm burst. Gen. Graves, Mr. Baldwin, Joe Godfrey, Albert Bacon, and Jim Chiles were the only ones twas due. At the depot in Albany, Albert Bacon, Joe Godfrey, Mr. Baldwin, and Gen. Graves were waiting for us. We drove by the post office to get the mail, and there
sients, if father was keeping a hotel-friends, acquaintances, and strangers whom the tide of war has stranded in little Washington. Mrs. Gairdner's husband was an officer in the English army at Waterloo, and a schoolmate of Lord Byron, and her sons are brave Confederates--which is better than anything else. Mary Day had typhoid fever in Augusta. She is too weak to make the journey from Mayfield to Macon, and all non-combatants have been ordered to leave Augusta, so mother invited her to Haywood. Oh, that dear old home! I know it is sweeter than ever now, with all those delightful people gathered there. One good thing the war has done among many evils; it has brought us into contact with so many pleasant people we should never have known otherwise. I know it must be charming to have all those nice army officers around, and I do want to go back, but it is so nice here, too, that we have decided to stay a little longer. Father says that this is the best place for us now that Kil
Julia Toombs (search for this): chapter 3
ters are beginning to subside, but the roads are terrible. We have had a mail at last, too, and a long letter from home giving us carte blanche as to future movements; as dear old father expressed it: Go where you please, when you please, do what you please and call on Mr. Farley or Mr. Butler for all the money you need. That is the way I like to be treated. I think now we will go to Chunnennuggee by way of Eufaula and the Chattahoochee. The river trip would be pleasant, and Jenny and Julia Toombs are with their aunt in Eufaula, who has invited us to meet them there. However, our movements are so uncertain that I don't like to make engagements. We will stop a few days in Cuthbert with the Joyners, anyway. March 21, Tuesday. Albany Pouring down rain again, but the carriage had to go to Albany anyway, to meet sister, and Mecca was hurried home by news of the death of her aunt, so I rode in to the station with her. The roads are horrible-covered with water most of the way,
French Yankee (search for this): chapter 3
hat to do with themselves. Even the Lancers are tame in comparison with a waltz or a galop. I love the galop and the Deux Temps better than any. We kept it up till two o'clock in the morning, and then walked home. While going our rounds in the morning, we found a very important person in Peter Louis, a paroled Yankee prisoner, in the employ of Capt. Bonham. The captain keeps him out of the stockade, feeds and clothes him, and in return, reaps the benefit of his skill. Peter is a French Yankee, Everybody that fought in the Union army was classed by us as a Yankee, whether Southern Union men, foreigners, or negroes; hence the expressions Irish Yankee, Dutch Yankee, black Yankee, etc., in contradistinction to the Simon-pure native product, the Yankee par excellence. a shoemaker by trade, and makes as beautiful shoes as I ever saw imported from France. My heart quite softened towards him when I saw his handiwork, and little Mrs. Sims was so overcome that she gave him a huge s
ld mammy, Aunt Lizzie. She lives in a pretty little cottage on a corner of the lot, and is more petted and spoiled than any of his children. The day Cousin Bolling was first expected in Americus with his bride, Flora went to town to put the house in order for them, and asked Aunt Lizzie to cook dinner for the newly married pair. What you talkin‘ ‘bout, chile? was the answer. I wouldn't cook fur Jesus Christ to-day, let alone Dr. Pope. Poor, down-trodden creature! what a text for Mrs. Stowe! She has relented since then, however, and Cousin Bessie says often sends her presents of delicious rolls and light bread. She took me into favor at once, told me all about her rheumatiz, and de spiration of her heart, and kissed my hand fervently when I went away. Capt. Rust was so afraid of being left again that he would not wait for the omnibus, but trotted me off on foot an hour ahead of time, although it was raining. We met Mr. Wheatley and Maj. Daniel on our way to the depot, and
and I are to spend next week in Albany with Mrs. Sims, if we are not all water-bound in the meantiuld seem to favor the Baptists just now. Mrs. Sims almost made me cry with her account of poor . The rain held up about dinner time and Mrs. Sims determined to return to Albany, in spite of ers. There was no service at St. Paul's, so Mrs. Sims kept Metta and me in the line of duty by rea. We spent the morning making calls with Mrs. Sims, and found among the refugees from South Carre busy returning calls all the morning, and Mrs. Sims, always in a hurry, sent us up to dress for l our escorts came for us at nine o'clock. Mrs. Sims is one of these fidgety little bodies that i Jim Chiles home with me. I took dinner with Mrs. Sims and met several friends, whom I invited to osoon as Mecca and I were safely deposited at Mrs. Sims's. The train was not due till three, and ourer. She was very tired and went directly to Mrs. Sims's, but Mecca and I walked down Broad street [10 more...]
aving me to enjoy life with Mrs. Meals and Hannah More. The Edwin Bacons and Merrill Callaway and his bride were invited to spend the evening with us and I found it rather dull. I am just sick enough to be a bore to myself and everybody else. Merrill has married Katy Furlow, of Americus, and she says that soon after my journey home last spring she met my young Charlestonian, and that he went into raptures over me, and said he never was so delighted with anybody in his life, so it seems the ae. I pretended a great deal of curiosity and asked what sort of poetry it was. Mr. Bacon then repeated some of my own ridiculous rhymes to me. It is a capital thing, he said, shaking with laughter, only a little hard on Hobbs. It is just like Merrill, said I; but I am sorry the captain found out I didn't send it before mailing his reply. I am going to tell them better in a few days and let them see how royally they have been fooled. Feb. 17, Friday We had expected to bring Miss Pync
long on the way. We found sister busy with preparations for Julia's birthday party, which came off in the afternoon. All the children in the neighborhood were invited and most of the grown people, too. The youngsters were turned loose in the backyard to play King's Base, Miley Bright, &c., and before we knew it, we grown people found ourselves as deep in the fun as the children. In the midst of it all a servant came up on horseback with a letter for sister. It proved to be a note from Capt. Hines bespeaking her hospitality for Gen. Sam Jones and staff, and of course she couldn't refuse, though the house was crowded to overflowing already. She had hardly finished reading when a whole cavalcade of horses and government wagons came rattling up to the door, and the general and one of his aides helped two ladies and their children to alight from an ambulance in which they were traveling. When they saw what a party we had on hand, they seemed a little embarrassed, but sister laughed
Brown Ayres (search for this): chapter 3
a brand new bride from beyond the blockade, with trunk loads of new things, but curiosity got the better of us, and so we agreed to go home with him. He is occupying Col. Maxwell's house while the family are on the plantation in Lee county. When we reached the house with Cousin Bolling, Mrs. Pope-or Cousin Bessie, as she says we must call her now, made us feel easy by sending for us to come to her bedroom, as there was no fire in the parlor, and she would not make company of us. She was a Mrs. Ayres, before her marriage to Cousin Bolling, a young widow from Memphis, Tenn., and very prominent in society there. She is quite handsome, and, having just come from beyond the lines, her beautiful dresses were a revelation to us dowdy Confederates, and made me feel like a plucked peacock. Her hair was arranged in three rolls over the top of the head, on each side of the part, in the style called cats, rats, and mice, on account of the different size of the rolls, the top one being the lar
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...