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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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Garrett Davis (search for this): chapter 21
Chapter 20: military situation in Kentucky. General Johnston's arrival in Nashville. personal reminiscences, the defense of Tennessee. General Johnston's resources and theory. letter to President Davis. the Confederate line. Zollicoffer and Buckner. Buckner seizes Bowling Green. Federal alarm. Confederate advance. General Johnston's proclamation. considerations determining the line. the theatre of War. strength of armies. Johnston conceals his weakness, his memoranda. Federal plans. Johnston's staff. The command intrusted to General Johnston was imperial in extent, his discretion as to military movements was unlimited, and his powers were as large as the theory of the Confederate Government permitted. He lacked nothing, except men and munitions of war, and the means of obtaining them. His army had to be enlisted, before it could be led. Subsistence could be obtained, it is true, through his commissaries; but the country was already drained of material o
S. B. Buckner (search for this): chapter 21
General S. B. Buckner, as already stated. Buckner, after his resignation, and after some ineffean fiercer spirits; but the man who questions Buckner's integrity invites doubt of his own honesty confident you will be wanting in neither. Buckner moved on the 17th of September by rail, and ee, and arrested a whole plan of campaign. Buckner's movement produced an excitement out of all and that the enemy was on the watch for him, Buckner, who had already reached the suburbs of Eliza under Polk, 11,000 troops (estimated); under Buckner, 4,000 men; and under Zollicoffer, 4,000 mores a base of operations, and I had ordered General Buckner, in the first place, not to advance to thn the rear of any force at Muldrough's Hill. Buckner's force was small, was illy armed, had no traemy's forces increased much more rapidly than Buckner's; and the ratio of increase was fully preseree corps already mentioned: Polk at Columbus, Buckner at Bowling Green, and Zollicoffer at Cumberla[8 more...]
H. P. Brewster (search for this): chapter 21
Western Department, Columbus, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps.-First-Lieutenant Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant-General. The appointments of volunteer aides were made chiefly to secure intelligent advice on the political affairs of the department, each State of whic
George T. Howard (search for this): chapter 21
ll was announced as assistant adjutant-general and chief of staff. A little later, order no. 2, as follows, was issued: orders no. 2.headquarters, Western Department, Columbus, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps.-First-Lieutenant Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant-Gener
R. P. Hunt (search for this): chapter 21
tember, 1861, in orders no. 1, General Johnston assumed command of the department, and Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. MacKALLall was announced as assistant adjutant-general and chief of staff. A little later, order no. 2, as follows, was issued: orders no. 2.headquarters, Western Department, Columbus, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps
Nathaniel Wickliffe (search for this): chapter 21
s, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps.-First-Lieutenant Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant-General. The appointments of volunteer aides were made chiefly to secure intelligent advice on the political affairs of the department, each State of which was represented on the st
es to their Western foot-hills, and the creation of a disloyal and hostile section, severing the East from the West, and converting the Gibraltar of the South into a stronghold for its foes. a line from the mouth of the Big Sandy River, where West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky corner, to Bowling Green, roughly indicates the Western edge of this Union district. But a belt of country through Western Kentucky and Tennessee, from the Ohio River to the State of Mississippi, was also full of Unionists ; and, indeed, in all Western Kentucky county was set against county, and every house was divided against itself. The whole land was become a debatable ground. The chief Confederate element, however, was contained in a narrow district along the Ohio River, fifty or sixty miles wide, almost isolated from the South, and surrounded by hostile regions. Wealthy and slaveholding, this population was much demoralized by the course of events and by Federal military occupation; and no effectual
Colonel W. W. MacKALLall was announced as assistant adjutant-general and chief of staff. A little later, order no. 2, as follows, was issued: orders no. 2.headquarters, Western Department, Columbus, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps.-First-Lieutenant Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Ass
D. M. Haydon (search for this): chapter 21
assistant adjutant-general and chief of staff. A little later, order no. 2, as follows, was issued: orders no. 2.headquarters, Western Department, Columbus, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps.-First-Lieutenant Joseph Dixon. By command of General A. S. Johnston. W. W. Mackall, Assistant Adjutant-General. The appointmen
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 21
ive, and when its detached corps must be moved in unison, or be destroyed in detail. The occupation of Columbus by General Polk has already been related. This, and the simultaneous seizure of Paducah by General Grant, opposing two hostile armies have determined to occupy Bowling Green at once. Information I believe to be reliable has just been received that General Polk has advanced upon Paducah with 7,500 men. The indications are distinct leading to the conclusion that the enemy designnteers; and, with home Guards, probably over 40,000 troops. to oppose this force General Johnston had, available under Polk, 11,000 troops (estimated); under Buckner, 4,000 men; and under Zollicoffer, 4,000 more. The whole force in Zollicoffer'silroad, and East Tennessee. These four approaches were covered, as far as possible, by the three corps already mentioned: Polk at Columbus, Buckner at Bowling Green, and Zollicoffer at Cumberland Gap. The enemy was much the stronger, and was operat
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