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D. H. Hill (search for this): chapter 10
rs No. 191 he had a copy of it made and sent to Hill before starting for Harper's Ferry, which Hill Hill produced after the termination of the war, and his adjutant general made affidavit that no other ordas received at his office from General Lee. As Hill was to remain with Lee and not march with Jacks but how transmitted from Lee's headquarters to Hill's camp, and who was guilty of gross carelessness Gap, a small one to the south of Turner's. As Hill reached the top of the mountain on that Septembed to any one, and was both grand and sublime. Hill must have felt helpless with his five small bri his work at Harper's Ferry. The resistance of Hill's troops — from nine in the morning till half-pt later in the afternoon between Longstreet and Hill on the one side, and Burnside with the two corp men (three of his brigades were with Jackson), Hill says only four were seriously engaged. So the hat night between Generals Lee, Longstreet, and Hill, it was decided to withdraw the troops from tha
4, 1862, he had fifty thousand troops, while Pope, including his own army, had, with Reno's corps of Burnside's army and Reynolds's division of Pennsylvania reserves, about the same number, which two days later was increased to seventy thousand by tht day Jackson's command was still eating, sleeping, and resting at Manassas. McDowell, with his own, Sigel's corps, and Reynolds's division of Pope's army, was at Gainesville, fifteen miles from Manassas and five from Thoroughfare Gap, through whichew position a courier of the enemy was captured by the cavalry, who was conveying a dispatch from Mc-Dowell to Sigel and Reynolds, which disclosed Pope's intention to concentrate on Manassas. One of Jackson's division commanders writes that the messon Jackson's right, and ready for battle at twelve o'clock on the 29th. At daylight on that day, to Sigel, supported by Reynolds, was delegated the duty of attacking Jackson and bringing him to a stand, as Pope expressed it, until he could get up He
: Second battle of Manassas. The strategy of Lee was daring and dangerous, the conception brilli. At Gainesville, Stuart, with Robertson and Fitz Lee's brigades of cavalry, overtook Jackson, whos This enterprising officer, having executed General Lee's instructions and having torn up the railrJackson lay, being directly between Jackson and Lee, while Reno's corps and Kearny's division of He to defeat him before being re-enforced by General Lee. General Lee, with Longstreet's command, lep by a trail. At dawn on the 29th, much to General Lee's relief, Ricketts had marched away to joinPope, desiring to delay as long as possible General Lee's further advance on Washington, renewed thboroa during the night, and was directed by General Lee to remain there and retard as much as possi Shepherdstown in a perfect panic, and that General Lee had stated publicly the night before that h admit he had been shockingly whipped, and that Lee was reported wounded. Mr. Lincoln was well ple[17 more...]
B. W. Mitchell (search for this): chapter 10
t no other order was received at his office from General Lee. As Hill was to remain with Lee and not march with Jackson, another copy of this order was addressed to him, but how transmitted from Lee's headquarters to Hill's camp, and who was guilty of gross carelessness in losing it, has never been ascertained. The Twelfth Federal Army Corps stacked arms when they arrived at Frederick on the 13th, on the ground that had been previously occupied by General D. H. Hill's division; and Private B. W. Mitchell, of Company F, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteers, Third Brigade, First Division, found it on the ground wrapped around three cigars. Little did he think how his discovery would affect a great campaign! The knowledge of its contents had a marvelous effect upon McClellan. Lee had been informed by his cavalry of McClellan's reaching Frederick. He did not know that his designs had been disclosed to him, and therefore did not understand the sudden life infused into the legs of the Fed
Fitz John Porter (search for this): chapter 10
y thousand by the arrival of the corps of Fitz John Porter and Heintzelman. Lee proposed to hold ths four miles from Manassas, and Banks and Fitz John Porter at Warrenton Junction ten miles. On the naged his men by stating that McDowell and Fitz John Porter were marching so as to get in Jackson's re night was retired to its first position. Porter's inaction in front of Longstreet has been theongstreet, because, having nearly three men to Porter's one, he could easily defeat him. It is certain that when Pope ordered Porter at half past 4 o'clock in the afternoon to attack, Longstreet's whoeen in front of him for four hours and a half. Porter reported the enemy were in great force in frone so as to deceive the enemy, and according to Porter's dispatch, it had the desired effect. Stuarte impression that he had a large force in Fitz John Porter's front. The next day — the 30th-Pope, dshington, renewed the engagement. He advanced Porter, whom he had called to him during the night, s[2 more...]
s own, Sigel's corps, and Reynolds's division of Pope's army, was at Gainesville, fifteen miles from Manassas and five from Thoroughfare Gap, through which Lee's route to Jackson lay, being directly between Jackson and Lee, while Reno's corps and Kearny's division of Heintzelman's corps were at Greenwich, in easy supporting distance. Hooker at Bristoe Station was four miles from Manassas, and Banks and Fitz John Porter at Warrenton Junction ten miles. On the night of the 27th everything was favted by darkness. The battle of Oxhill, as it was called, was fought in the midst of a thunderstorm. Longstreet's troops came on the field toward its conclusion. The loss on both sides was heavy, the Federals losing two of their best generals, Kearny and Stevens. The former was a dashing officer of undoubted courage and great merit. Had he lived he might have been an army commander. He rode into the Confederate lines, thinking they were occupied by a portion of his troops. It was nearly d
Ambrose E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 10
y of Lee was daring and dangerous, the conception brilliant and bold. Self-reliant, he decided to separate his army into two parts. On August 24, 1862, he had fifty thousand troops, while Pope, including his own army, had, with Reno's corps of Burnside's army and Reynolds's division of Pennsylvania reserves, about the same number, which two days later was increased to seventy thousand by the arrival of the corps of Fitz John Porter and Heintzelman. Lee proposed to hold the line of the Rappaha the morning till half-past 3 in the afternoon-to the attack of Reno's corps reflected great credit upon the capacity of the commander and the courage of his men. The combat later in the afternoon between Longstreet and Hill on the one side, and Burnside with the two corps of Reno and Hooker on the other, was marked by great gallantry on the part of both. Of the nine brigades Longstreet had with him, whose strength he estimated at thirteen thousand men (three of his brigades were with Jackson),
Stephen D. Lee (search for this): chapter 10
he latter after first pounding the flanks of Pope's assaulting columns with artillery, under Stephen D. Lee, splendidly massed and served. Pope and Lee were of the same mind that day from their respeLee were of the same mind that day from their respective standpoints, for as the former was moving on Lee's center and left, the latter was marching to attack the Federal left. A bloody and hard-fought battle resulted, in which the Federal troops weLee's center and left, the latter was marching to attack the Federal left. A bloody and hard-fought battle resulted, in which the Federal troops were everywhere driven back, and when night put an end to the contest, Pope's line of communication was threatened by the Southern troops occupying the Sudley Springs road close to the stone bridge on Bull Run. He could stay in Lee's front no longer, for he had been badly defeated, and that night withdrew to Centreville, having lost, since he left the Rappahannock, in killed, wounded, and missingy-five thousand. The march of these troops and their junction with Pope had been reported to General Lee by the cavalry, under Fitz Lee, which, having left Manassas the day of Jackson's arrival ther
by General Lee. General Lee, with Longstreet's command, left the Rapidan on the 26th and followed Jackson's route. A little before dark on the 28th he reached and occupied the western side of Thoroughfare Gap with one brigade. At the same time Ricketts came up from Gainesville with his division and occupied the eastern side of the same pass. Longstreet describes this pass as rough and at some points not more than one hundred yards wide. A turbid stream rushes over its rugged bottom, on both were taken to prevent it. Hopewell was occupied, and through it three brigades under Wilcox were passed during the night, while Hood climbed over the mountain near Thoroughfare Gap by a trail. At dawn on the 29th, much to General Lee's relief, Ricketts had marched away to join McDowell. At 9 A. M. the head of Longstreet's column reached Gainesville on the Warrenton pike. The troops passed through the town and down the turnpike and were deployed on Jackson's right, and ready for battle at twe
Henry W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 10
my was posted on the heights of Centreville. Halleck telegraphed him on that day from Washington: ared the total destruction of the army; while Halleck, in a dispatch from Washington on August 29thy next day, however, at Centreville, he wires Halleck that his troops were in position there, thougtant-General Kelton, who had been sent out by Halleck, puts the number at thirty thousand. Much unsound of the firing of his men, and asked General Halleck on the night of the 30th of August for peuld stake his life to save the city, but that Halleck and the President said it would, in their jud had been assigned to take the field with it. Halleck had intimated that McClellan would not be all planned to show that McClellan was right and Halleck wrong, though it involved a change of his oriven o'clock on the night of the 13th informed Halleck that an order of General Lee's, addressed to mns arrived west of the mountains he informed Halleck that his enemy was making for Shepherdstown i[4 more...]
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