hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis 656 14 Browse Search
United States (United States) 252 0 Browse Search
Zachary Taylor 164 8 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 140 0 Browse Search
V. H. Davis 126 0 Browse Search
John C. Calhoun 115 1 Browse Search
John Davis 115 1 Browse Search
Sidney Webster 112 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 112 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 84 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 220 total hits in 76 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8
ucks were not, as now, going to join the buffaloes, the dodo, the roc, and the phoenix as extinct animals; so they were there in profusion. The perfume of the long-necked bottle of Rhine wine filled the room, which the Professor opened himself, there being no servants present, and the gentlemen pledged us and each other in a glass, and the quip and jest flew from one to another, and made of our suppers at the Coast Survey real noctes ambrosianae. When Professor Bache was domesticated with Humboldt, whither he went to investigate the school system of Germany, he learned to like these wines, and always imported them himself. Mr. Davis was the life of the party, and I never heard him advert but once with regret to a night there. He was one Christmas persuaded to sing an Indian song, and Dallas Bache put on a fur coat to personate Santa Claus, and gave the presents in the most truly dreadful doggerel. Six months afterward, one warm summer day, Mr. Davis exclaimed that he felt oppre
Chapter 22: the secret service fund--charges against Webster, 1845-46. Mr. Davis saw that he had been approved by Mr. Adams, and generally recognized as a personage in the House, without any one having an exact reason to assign for this distinction, and was subsequently brought more prominently into notice by an attack made upon Mr. Webster by Mr. Charles Jared Ingersoll in the House of Representatives. The hands of the public men of the time had been clean of plunder, or the imputation of dishonesty — it was not a day of personal investigations. Wall Street had no subterranean passage leading to the White House; and an imputation upon the honor of a senator startled his colleagues like a fire-bell in the night. Mr. Ingersoll astonished the House and Senate by moving an inquiry into Mr. Webster's conduct as Secretary of State. lie asked for the papers relating to the killing of Durpree, an American. In 1837, a party of Americans had made an effort to capture and occupy
Chapter 22: the secret service fund--charges against Webster, 1845-46. Mr. Davis saw that he had been approved by Mr. Adams, and generally recognized as a personage in the House, without any one having an exact reason to assign for this distinction, and was subsequently brought more prominently into notice by an attack made upon Mr. Webster by Mr. Charles Jared Ingersoll in the House of Representatives. The hands of the public men of the time had been clean of plunder, or the imputatiored. Mr. Webster called upon Mr. Davis and expressed in warm terms his sense of the manly manner in which he had defended him. Mr. and Mrs. Webster came to call upon me, and invited me most kindly to accompany them to Marshfield. It was in 1845 that the first Exposition of a general character took place. It was called then a National Exhibition. It was a very long, rough, clapboard room, with no pretention to any architectural merit. It occupied nearly two squares on C Street, and was
t day, except in the case of re-election, no ex-President considered it a dignified course to return to Washington, and ex-President John Quincy Adams's return to serve in the House had been much criticised and regretted by all parties; but the old man eloquent concerned himself very little with the standards of others; he enjoyed and took his own way. Mr. Tyler remembered Mr. Davis also, and was gracious enough to speak of the impression he had received when Mr. Davis was presented to him in 1836. Mr. Tyler accepted my husband's arm, and we walked slowly on, and then those two interesting gentlemen thoroughly succeeded in shuffling off the mortal coil of the childish young person who trotted beside them, ardently longing for a look at all the new and curious wares displayed; but perforce of the dignity and simplicity of their conversation was somewhat consoled for the personal sacrifice. However, our few outings generally ended in the same way. After a cursory view of the po
public men of the time had been clean of plunder, or the imputation of dishonesty — it was not a day of personal investigations. Wall Street had no subterranean passage leading to the White House; and an imputation upon the honor of a senator startled his colleagues like a fire-bell in the night. Mr. Ingersoll astonished the House and Senate by moving an inquiry into Mr. Webster's conduct as Secretary of State. lie asked for the papers relating to the killing of Durpree, an American. In 1837, a party of Americans had made an effort to capture and occupy Navy Island, a British possession, and Durpree had been one of them. The attempt was not successful, the invading party were captured, and Durpree killed in the melee. In 1840, two years after, McLeod, the man who killed him, related the circumstance in a boastful manner in New York. He was arrested and tried for murder. Mr. Fox, for the English Government, avowed the act and demanded McLeod's release. Mr. Ingersoll accuse
or startled his colleagues like a fire-bell in the night. Mr. Ingersoll astonished the House and Senate by moving an inquiry into Mr. Webster's conduct as Secretary of State. lie asked for the papers relating to the killing of Durpree, an American. In 1837, a party of Americans had made an effort to capture and occupy Navy Island, a British possession, and Durpree had been one of them. The attempt was not successful, the invading party were captured, and Durpree killed in the melee. In 1840, two years after, McLeod, the man who killed him, related the circumstance in a boastful manner in New York. He was arrested and tried for murder. Mr. Fox, for the English Government, avowed the act and demanded McLeod's release. Mr. Ingersoll accused Mr. Webster of using the contingent fund and his personal influence over Mr. W. H. Seward, Governor of New York, to secure McLeod's release; of expending public moneys in corrupting the press and the people, and of being himself a defaulte
... 3 4 5 6 7 8