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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

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May, 1884 AD (search for this): chapter 3.29
accosted by Brigadier-General Pender: Oh, General, I hope you are not seriously wounded. I will have to retire my troops to re-form them, they are so much broken by this fire. But Jackson, rallying his strength, with firm voice said: You must hold your ground, General Pender; you must hold your ground, sir! and so uttered his last command on the field. The New Chancellor House. This picture is from a photograph taken at a reunion of Union and Confederate officers and soldiers in May, 1884. The original house (see p. 190) was set on fire by Confederate shells on Sunday, May 3d, shortly after Hooker was injured while standing on the porch. The picture faces south; Jackson attacked the Eleventh Corps from the left (west) by the Plank road, which passes in front of tie Chancellor House. The cross-road in the foreground leads northward to Ely's Ford and United States Ford. See map, p. 158.--editors. Again we resorted to the litter, and with difficulty bore it through th
nd began the disposition of his forces to attack Howard. Rodes's division, at the head of the column, was thrown into line of battle, with Colston's forming the second line and A. P. Hill's the third, while the artillery under Colonel Stapleton Crutchfield moved in column on the road, or was parked in a field on the right. The well-trained skirmishers of Rodes's division, under Major Eugene Blackford, were thrown to the front. It must have been between 5 and 6 o'clock in the evening, Saturday, May 2d, when these dispositions were completed. Upon his stout-built, long-paced little sorrel, General Jackson sat, with visor low over his eyes and lips compressed, and with his watch in his hand. Upon his right sat General Robert E. Rodes, the very picture of a soldier, and every inch all that he appeared. Upon the right of Rodes sat Major Blackford. Are you ready, General Rodes? said Jackson. Yes, sir! said Rodes, impatient for the advance. You can go forward then, said Jacks
pp. 198 and 202.--editors. A little show of earth-work facing the south was quickly taken by us in reverse from the west. Flying battalions are not Brigadier-General E. F. Paxton, commanding the Stonewall Brigade of Colston's division, killed May 3. from a Tintype. flying buttresses for an army's stability. Across Talley's fields the rout begins. Over at Hawkins's hill, on the north of the road, Carl Schurz makes a stand, soon to be driven into the same hopeless panic. By the quiet Wilcommand on the field. The New Chancellor House. This picture is from a photograph taken at a reunion of Union and Confederate officers and soldiers in May, 1884. The original house (see p. 190) was set on fire by Confederate shells on Sunday, May 3d, shortly after Hooker was injured while standing on the porch. The picture faces south; Jackson attacked the Eleventh Corps from the left (west) by the Plank road, which passes in front of tie Chancellor House. The cross-road in the foregro
thought I heard firing, and was beginning to think it was time some of you young fellows were coming to tell me what it was all about. Tell your good general that I am sure he knows what to do. I will meet him at the front very soon. It was Sedgwick who had crossed, and, marching along the river front to impress us with his numbers, was now intrenching his line on the river road, under cover of Federal batteries on the north bank. All day long we lay in the old lines of the action of December preceding, watching the operation of the enemy. Nor did we move through the next day, the 30th of April. During the forenoon of the 29th General Lee had been informed by General J. E. B. Stuart of the movement in force by General Hooker across the Rappahannock upon Chancellorsville; and during the night of Thursday, April 30th, General Jackson withdrew his corps, leaving Early and his division with Barksdale's brigade to hold the old lines from Hamilton's Crossing along the rear of Freder
ching his line on the river road, under cover of Federal batteries on the north bank. All day long we lay in the old lines of the action of December preceding, watching the operation of the enemy. Nor did we move through the next day, the 30th of April. During the forenoon of the 29th General Lee had been informed by General J. E. B. Stuart of the movement in force by General Hooker across the Rappahannock upon Chancellorsville; and during the night of Thursday, April 30th, General JacksonThursday, April 30th, General Jackson withdrew his corps, leaving Early and his division with Barksdale's brigade to hold the old lines from Hamilton's Crossing along the rear of Fredericksburg. By the light of a brilliant moon, at midnight, that passed into an early dawn of dense mist, the troops were moved, by the Old Mine road, out of sight of the enemy, and about 11 A. M. of Friday, May 1st, they reached Anderson's position, confronting Hooker's advance from Chancellorsville, near the Tabernacle Church on the Plank road. To
General Rodes? said Jackson. Yes, sir! said Rodes, impatient for the advance. You can go forward then, said Jackson. A nod from Rodes was order enough for Blackford, and then suddenly the woods rang with the bugle call, and back came the responses from bugles on the right and left, and the long line of skirmishers, through the wild thicket of undergrowth, sprang Stonewall Jackson's old Sorrel. This picture is from a photograph taken at the Maryland State Fair at Hagerstown, in 1884. At that time Old Sorrel was thought to be about thirty-four years old. At the fair, relic-hunters plucked away much of his mane and tail.--editors. eagerly to their work, followed promptly by the quick steps of the line of battle. For a moment all the troops seemed buried in the depths of the gloomy forest, and then suddenly the echoes waked and swept the country for miles, never failing until heard at the headquarters of Hooker at Chancellorsville — the wild rebel yell of the long Confed
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