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John Echols (search for this): chapter 1.1
edoes, not having come into play. Fort Sumter was the principal object of the attack, and to that garrison . . . special credit is due for sustaining the shock, and, with their powerful armament, contributing principally to the repulse. Major Echols, of the Corps of Engineers, in his report to Major Harris, Chief Engineer of the department, used this language: She [the Keokuk] sank off the south end of Morris Island at half-past 8 o'clock the following morning (April 8). Her smoke-stand the water, consequently, was as stable as that of a river; their guns were fired with deliberation, doubtless by trained artillerists. According to the enemy's statements, the fleet fired 151 shots. . . . Not more than thirty-four shots Major Echols's report puts the number at fifty-five, which it is conceded is the correct one.--G. T. B. took effect on the walls of Fort Sumter. . . . Fort Moultrie and our other batteries were not touched in a way to be considered, while in return they th
January 30th (search for this): chapter 1.1
ce to organize an expedition and have masked batteries erected at designated points on the banks of the Stono, near where the Federal gunboat habitually passed and occasionally remained overnight. The instructions were to allow her to steam by unmolested as far as she chose to go, then to open fire and cut off her retreat. The expedition was intrusted to Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph A. Yates, First South Carolina Artillery (regulars), and was most successfully conducted. On the evening of January 30th the Isaac Smith came up the Stono, and leisurely anchored just above our masked batteries. Fire was now opened upon her. She endeavored to make her escape, returning our fire as she passed, but was so roughly handled, and at such close range, that she dropped anchor and surrendered. Her armament consisted of one 30-pounder Parrott and eight 8-inch heavy Columbiads. Her crew was of 11 officers and 108 men. Upon examination the damage she had sustained was found to be slight. She was t
James C. Parrott (search for this): chapter 1.1
hly handled, and at such close range, that she dropped anchor and surrendered. Her armament consisted of one 30-pounder Parrott and eight 8-inch heavy Columbiads. Her crew was of 11 officers and 108 men. Upon examination the damage she had sustainandon their pieces,--three 8-inch navy shell guns, two 8-inch sea-coast howitzers, one rifled 24-pounder, one 30-pounder Parrott, one 12-pounder Whitworth, three 10-inch sea-coast mortars,--eleven in all, and fall back. Two companies of the 7th From a work which was called the Swamp Angel, because of the spot where it had been erected, the enemy, with an 8-inch Parrott rifle-gun, and before receiving my answer, did open fire upon the heart of the city. I have reason to believe, however,ess loss of the garrisons of both Wagner and Gregg. The enemy's sap had reached the moat of the former work. The heavy Parrott shells used against its parapets had breached them and knocked away the bomb-proofs. It had become impossible to repair
Horatio G. Wright (search for this): chapter 1.1
dier-General [H. W.] Benham on the 16th of June, 1862. I deem it necessary to place the facts of this attack in their proper light, because that is the reason assigned by Gillmore for not having attacked by James Island in July, 1863, when he attempted the Morris Island route. The truth of the matter is, that the point attacked by Generals Benham and I. I. Stevens near Secessionville The assault at Secessionville was made by Stevens's division of about 3500 men, supported by General H. G. Wright's division, numbering 3100. Wright's troops were not seriously engaged. The aggregate Union loss was 683, of whom 529 belonged to Stevens's division. According to the report of General David Hunter, who commanded the department, the attack was made by General Benham in violation of his instructions. The Confederate force engaged was commanded by General N. G. Evans, and sustained a loss of about 200.--editors. was the strongest one of the whole line, which was then unfinished an
George D. Wagner (search for this): chapter 1.1
r that another attempt was about to be made against Wagner, and it was made with no less vigor than obstinacy.n to retire, and the land forces advanced to attack Wagner. They displayed great determination. A portion ofhe mainland were unfinished, I had resolved to hold Wagner and Gregg to the last extremity. Every movement ofce, while the accurate firing of Sumter, Gregg, and Wagner continued seriously to interfere with the working prvals, spared no effort to effect the demolition of Wagner also. In spite of the ability and determination ofresult in the useless loss of the garrisons of both Wagner and Gregg. The enemy's sap had reached the moat ofthe fuses, however, the powder magazines of neither Wagner nor Gregg were exploded, although they had been litit is history to say that the defense of Sumter and Wagner are feats of war unsurpassed in ancient or modern tmber 7th, 9875, making in all 16,326. And yet only Wagner was taken. Sumter, though a mass of ruins, remaine
Charles Steedman (search for this): chapter 1.1
t 110 [in fact, 151 to 154.--G. T. B.], which were principally directed at Sumter. Her walls show the effect of fifty-five missiles — shot, shells, and fragments. . . . The casualties are slight. At Sumter five men were wounded by fragments of masonry and wood. . . . At Moultrie one man was killed by the falling of the flagstaff when shot away. At Battery Wagner an ammunition chest . . . exploded from the blast of the gun. killing three men, mortally wounding one, slightly wounding Lieutenant Steedman, in charge of the gun, and three men. G. T. B. [See also papers to follow.] In the communication sent by me to the War Department, dated May 24th, with regard to the attack of April 7th, I made the following statement: The action lasted two hours and twenty-five minutes, but the chief damage is reported by the enemy to have been done in thirty minutes. The Keokuk did not come nearer than nine hundred yards of Fort Sumter; she was destroyed. The New Ironsides could not stand t
Percival Drayton (search for this): chapter 1.1
the weight of his official name,--that the rope obstructions in the channel fouled the screws of the iron-clads, was entirely erroneous. Not one of the iron-clads ever approached nearer than 600 yards to any of these obstructions, with the exception of the Keokuk, which dropped in to about 300 yards of them before being able to get under way again. The first shot was fired at 3 o'clock P. M. It came from Fort Moultrie, and was aimed at the Weehawken. No heed was taken of it. Captain Percival Drayton, of the Passaic, second in line, reported that the opening shots came from Fort Moultrie and the batteries on Sullivan's Island, and that his vessel replied to them in passing and pushed on for Sumter.--editors. The turreted iron-clad kept on her way until within fourteen. hundred yards of Fort Sumter, when she paused a moment and opened fire on it. Fully two minutes elapsed, and then Sumter replied, firing by battery. The other monitors now steamed up, taking their respective posi
John R. Tucker (search for this): chapter 1.1
. N., and of Mr. C. H. Stevens, afterward brigadier-general in the Confederate army, and both from South Carolina, is attributable also the revolution in naval architecture and armaments by which iron-clad war vessels have entirely superseded the now almost obsolete wooden men-of-war.--G. T. B. There were two Confederate gun-boats (iron-clad rams) at that time in Charleston, the Palmetto State and the Chicora. Lieutenant-Commander John Rutledge, C. S. N., commanded the first, and Captain John R. Tucker, C. S. N., commanded the second. Besides these there were three small harbor steamers, to be used as tenders for them. The Palmetto State and the Chicora were, unfortunately, of too heavy a draught to be of much practical use in the defense of the harbor. They were also lacking in motive power, consequently in speed; and their guns, on account of the smallness of the port-holes, could not be sufficiently Castle Pinckney, Charleston Harbor. ciently elevated, and were of but very
H. G. Wright (search for this): chapter 1.1
June, 1862. I deem it necessary to place the facts of this attack in their proper light, because that is the reason assigned by Gillmore for not having attacked by James Island in July, 1863, when he attempted the Morris Island route. The truth of the matter is, that the point attacked by Generals Benham and I. I. Stevens near Secessionville The assault at Secessionville was made by Stevens's division of about 3500 men, supported by General H. G. Wright's division, numbering 3100. Wright's troops were not seriously engaged. The aggregate Union loss was 683, of whom 529 belonged to Stevens's division. According to the report of General David Hunter, who commanded the department, the attack was made by General Benham in violation of his instructions. The Confederate force engaged was commanded by General N. G. Evans, and sustained a loss of about 200.--editors. was the strongest one of the whole line, which was then unfinished and was designed to be some five miles in len
Ulric Dahlgren (search for this): chapter 1.1
all the iron-clads that were to take part in the engagement consisted of 33 guns of the heaviest caliber ever used in war up to that time, to wit, 15 and 11 inch Dahlgren guns and 8-inch rifled pieces. To oppose this formidable array of new, and it was thought invulnerable, floating batteries, prepared at such heavy cost and wig's Point Battery, under Lieutenant Henry R. Lesesne, with a detachment of regulars from Fort Sumter. Two guns were engaged: one 10-inch Columbiad and one 8-inch Dahlgren. The number of guns actually engaged on our side against the iron-clad fleet, on the 7th of April, was therefore 69, of which five were mortars. Two companierked, when they also were withdrawn. Our loss was slight both in men and materials, and the Federal victory was barren. In General Gillmore's dispatch to Admiral Dahlgren, dated September 7th, 5:10 A. M., he said The whole island is ours, but the enemy have escaped us.--G. T. B. I have dwelt somewhat at length upon the det
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