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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
257, volume I. In the harangue from that balcony in the evening, with a negro slave standing each side of him, each holding a candle that the people might distinctly see his face, the arch-conspirator addressed them as Brethren of the Confederate States of America, and assured them that all was well, and they had nothing to fear at home or abroad. See page 257, volume I. On the following morning we visited the State capitol, See page 248, volume I. on the second bluff from the river, uff. From the cupola of that Capitol, we had a very extensive view of the country around, the winding Alabama River, and the city at our feet; and from the portico, where Jefferson Davis was inaugurated Provisional President of the Confederate States of America, we could look over nearly the whole. of the town. Montgomery must have been a very beautiful city, and desirable place of residence, before the war. We spent a greater part of the day in visiting places of interest about Montgom
Plantersville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
destroyed the bridge over the Cahawba, at Centreville, and rejoined April 5, 1865. Wildon at Selma. Wilson pushed southward from Randolph with the brigades of Long and Upton, and at-Ebenezer Church, near Boyle's Creek, six miles north of Plantersville, he was confronted by Forrest who had five thousand men behind a strong barricade and abatis. Forrest was straining every nerve to reach and defend Selma, which was one of the most important places in the Confederacy, on account of its immens such vigor, that the Confederates were routed, and fled in confusion toward Selma, leaving behind them two guns and two hundred prisoners in the hands of Alexander, and one gun as a trophy for Long. Winslow's brigade followed them as far as Plantersville, nineteen miles from Selma, where the chase ceased, and the victors bivouacked. Forrest had been driven on that day April 1, twenty-four miles. Selma was now the grand objective of pursued and pursuers. Because of its importance, it ha
Sidney (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
wing up and removing the obstructions in them. In this dangerous business three small vessels were destroyed by the explosion of torpedoes. On the 4th of May, Ebenezer Farrand, one of the traitors who placed the navy-yard near Pensacola in the hands of the Conspirators (see pages 168 and 169, volume I<*> in 1861, now in command of the few vessels belonging to the Confederates in the waters of Alabama, formally surrendered the whole, and the forces under his command, to Admiral Thatcher, at Sidney, on the terms which Grant had given to Lee a month before. Let us now consider the operations of General Wilson, in the field, while Canby was effecting the reduction of Mobile. After the close of Thomas's active campaign in Middle Tennessee, the cavalry of the Military Division of the Mississippi, numbering about twenty-two thousand men and horses, were encamped on the north side of the Tennessee River, at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, in Lauderdale County, Alabama. These had been
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
taking possession of abandoned batteries here and there. But the army found no enemy to fight. On the day after the fall of Blakely, Maury ordered the evacuation of Mobile; and on the 11th, after sinking the powerful rams Huntsville and Tuscaloosa, It is a curious fact that a very large proportion of the most powerful iron-clad vessels constructed by the Confederates, were destroyed by their own hands. Only a few days after the evacuation of Mobile the Confederate ram Webb, from the Red River, freighted with cotton, rosin, and other merchandise, went down the Mississippi, passing New Orleans on the 20th of April, so unexpectedly that she received but two shots as she went by, from batteries there, the vessels of war being yet in Mobile Bay. The Webb was pursued by gun-boats from above, and was hurrying toward the Gulf, when she encountered the corvette Richmond, coming up the river. The commander of the ram, seeing no chance for escape, ran her ashore and blew her up. He and
Blakely River (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
distance of not more than twenty miles from Spanish Fort, the heaviest of the fortifications to be attacked. The old Spanish Fort, erected when the Spaniards had possession of Mobile, was a rectangular bastioned work on a bluff commanding Blakely River and its vicinity. The works known as Spanish Fort, erected by the Confederates, extended along the bluff nearly two miles, and included two other works, known, respectively, as Red Fort and Fort Alexis, or Dermett. These works were calculate prisoners; and the spoils of victory were Spanish Fort proper and its inclosing works, with thirty heavy guns and a large quantity of munitions of war. These guns were now turned upon Forts Huger and Tracy, at the mouth of the Appalachee or Blakely River, which held out gallantly until the night of the 11th, April, 1865. when the garrison spiked the twelve guns that armed the two forts, and fled. The defense of Spanish Fort was skillfully and gallantly conducted, under General Gibson. Fr
Walker County (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
nished with the Spencer carbine. To deceive the Confederates, and accommodate itself to the condition of the country, Wilson's command moved on — diverging routes, the distances between the divisions expanding and contracting, according to circumstances. The general course was a little east of south, until they reached the waters of the Black Warrior River. Upton marched for Sanders's Ferry on the west fork of the Black Warrior, by way of Russellville and Mount Hope, to Jackson, in Walker County. Long went by devious ways to the same point, and McCook, taking the Tuscaloosa road as far as Eldridge, turned eastward to Jasper, from which point the whole force crossed the Black Warrior River. There, in the fertile region watered by the main affluents of the Tombigbee River, the columns simultaneously menaced Columbus, in Mississippi, and Tuscaloosa and Selma, in Alabama. At that time General Forrest, in command of the Confederate cavalry, was on the Mobile and Ohio railway, we
Mount Pleasant (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ying Claiborne, on the Alabama River, to prevent troops coming down to the relief of Mobile. He left on the 5th of April, and on the 7th he met a negro with dispatches from General Wilson to General Canby, carefully sewed up in the collar of his vest. Lucas furnished him with a guard and mule, and sent him on. From this courier he learned that a Confederate force was at Claiborne, and Lucas determined to capture it. On the way, the First Louisiana Cavalry encountered a mounted force at Mount Pleasant, charged and routed them, and in a pursuit of two miles, by Lucas in full force, he captured two battle-flags, three commissioned officers, and sixty men, with a loss of only five men. Pushing on to Claiborne, he went into camp there, and thither his scouts brought prisoners nearly every day On the 18th, when he received an order from Canby to return to Blakely, he had one hundred and fifty captives. the army and navy captured about five thousand men, nearly four hundred cannon, and a va
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
port. Early in February, it went in transports, accompanied by Knipe's division of cavalry, five thousand strong, by the waters of the Tennessee, Ohio, and Mississippi rivers, to New Orleans, where it arrived on the 21st, February. after a travel of over thirteen hundred miles in the space of eleven days. There the corps remaine hastened April 6, 1865. to Cahawba, the ancient capital of Alabama, This was the place where De Soto crossed the Alabama River, on his march toward the Mississippi River, which he discovered in the year 1541. a few miles down the stream, to meet General Forrest, under a flag of truce, by appointment, for the purpose of makings errand in that great metropolis of the Gulf region, he reluctantly bade adieu to his traveling companions for ten days (Mr. and Mrs. Hart), and embarked on the Mississippi River for Port Hudson and Vicksburg, in the steamer Indiana. That voyage has already been considered. See page 688, volume II. Tail-piece — artesian wel
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
aveholders for actual rebellion, and whilst it was rampant in New Orleans, might have been read these words of that great statesman:--if I could be instrumental in Eradicating this Deep stain, slavery, from the character of My country, I would not exchange the Proud satisfaction I should enjoy, for. The honor of all the triumphs ever decreed to the most successful conqueror. While no living lips, dared, for many months, to utter a word of reproof to those who, in New Orleans, were trying to destroy the. Union and establish an empire founded upon slavery, these mute but terrible accusers, rebuked the criminals unmolested. Having accomplished the object of his errand in that great metropolis of the Gulf region, he reluctantly bade adieu to his traveling companions for ten days (Mr. and Mrs. Hart), and embarked on the Mississippi River for Port Hudson and Vicksburg, in the steamer Indiana. That voyage has already been considered. See page 688, volume II. Tail-piece — artesian wel
Mobile Point (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
he fortifications on the islands and main land at the head of the bay, and then approach Mobile by way of Tensas River, or one of the channels above the city. For this purpose, a point on Fish River, that empties into Bon Secour Bay, north of Mobile Point, was chosen as the place of rendezvous for the troops, and a base of operations, at a distance of not more than twenty miles from Spanish Fort, the heaviest of the fortifications to be attacked. The old Spanish Fort, erected when the Spaniaher works, known, respectively, as Red Fort and Fort Alexis, or Dermett. These works were calculated for 36 guns, and a garrison of 2,500 men. That movement was begun on the 17th, March. when the Thirteenth Corps marched from Fort Morgan, on Mobile Point, and made its way slowly over a swampy region in heavy rains, consuming five or six days in the tedious and perilous journey. The Sixteenth Corps was already at the appointed rendezvous; having crossed the bay in transports from Fort Gaines t
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