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d daring. To mention the name of any particular officer or soldier as having distinguished himself for gallantry above his fellows, would be to do injustice; for the brigade, as a whole, has fully sustained its well-earned reputation, and given additional evidence of the disinterested devotion of Missourians to the cause of their country-showing, as heretofore, that they are always among the first in the breach, and the last to leave it. I am indebted to my Aids, Captain Edwards and Lieutenant Chesnut for the prompt and untiring energy with which they assisted me in the engagement. Major Monroe, my brigade Quartermaster, and Major Ruthven, my brigade Commissary, deserve great praise for the activity with which they discharged the duties of their respective departments. Chief Surgeon Bear, with the regimental surgeons and their assistants, were on the field, and, by their prompt professional attention to the wounded, saved many valuable lives. A report in detail of the killed, wou
olonel White, Adjutant Thomas, Lieutenants Kelly, Essleman, and Kerr. In Pindall's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The following is a summary of my losses in each regiment, battalion, and the artillery detachment: Seventh regimentKilled17  Wounded126  Missing54--197 Eighth regimentKilled14  Wounded82  Missing67--163 Ninth regimentKilled7  Wounded53--60 Te
L. A. Maclean (search for this): chapter 47
s of perilous trial (apart from the intelligent and faithful performance of the responsible and onerous duties of his office), surpassed himself this day in the intrepid manner with which he bore himself throughout the conflict, rallying the troops again and again, and urging them forward to the scene of action. In this work, under the hottest fire of the enemy, and until we had swept their intrenchments and carried the hill, he was faithfully, fearlessly, and gallantly assisted by Major L. A. Maclean, A. A. G. My thanks are due to my Aids-de-Camp, Lieutenant Richard T. Morrison and Lieutenant Celsus Price, for their willing assistance promptly rendered upon this, as upon other hotly contested fields. I commend all these officers to the Lieutenant-General commanding, and through him to the President, for promotion, on account of gallant and meritorious conduct in the field. Acting Engineers, John Mhoon, of Alabama, and D. C. Cage, of Mississippi, not only deserve honorable
John Tyler (search for this): chapter 47
and commendation are due for the sedulous manner in which they have at all times devoted themselves to the sick and wounded, but never more humanely or more conspicuously than upon this occasion. These gentlemen tell me that they owe their grateful acknowledgments to the Reverend Mr. Marvin for the very important services which he rendered at their hospitals, not only offering the consolation of his holy office to the dying, but ministering assiduously to the wants of the wounded. Major John Tyler, C. S. A., acting, for want of an appropriate command, as volunteer Aid-de-Camp, remained by my side in view of special contingencies, which might fittingly task his valuable accomplishments. Mr. Charles T. Perrie, volunteer Aid-de-Camp, is also entitled to my thanks for the activity which he displayed at the opening of the attack. I would refer particularly to the gallant conduct and bearing of Mr. Gustavus A. Dyer, Clerk in the office of the Assistant Adjutant-General, and of Or
James H. Tucker (search for this): chapter 47
portant orders to Colonel Brooks, some distance from me on my right. I was consequently deprived of the valuable assistance his quickness and daring so well qualify him to render on the field. Captain John B. Howell, my Ordnance Officer, was ordered to remain constantly with his ammunition train, which, as above stated, had to be left in the rear. This deprived me of the immediate services of this gallant officer. The officers of my staff, Major B. F. Fall, brigade Commissary; Mr. James H. Tucker volunteer Aid-de-Camp, and Mr. J. W. Paul, acting Inspector-General, are all entitled to my thanks for the assistance rendered me during the engagement. The aggregate force engaged against Fort Hindman and the defences in front of it, was thirteen hundred and thirty-nine. I have, Major, the honor to be, With much respect, Your obedient servant, J. F. Fagan, Brigadier-General. Report of Colonel King. Heaquarters King's regiment Arkansas infantry, camp at Searcy, J
John M. Brooke (search for this): chapter 47
the fort, until about eleven o'clock A. M., at which time we were ordered off the field. I cannot speak too highly of the most of my officers and men throughout the fight, particularly of the gallant Major Dillard and Adjutant Bourne, who were in every charge, and cheering the men on at all times. My loss was as follows: twelve killed, forty-six wounded, and twenty missing. I have the honor to be, Your obedient servant, J. P. King, Colonel, commanding Regiment. Report of Colonel Brooke. headquarters Brooks' regiment, camp near Cotton Plant, July 10, 1863. Captain Wyatt C. Thomas, Assistant Adjutant-General Second Brigade: Captain: I have the honor to report the following as the part taken by my command in the engagement of the fourth instant at Helena: At dusk on the third, in compliance with instructions from Brigadier-General Fagan,I moved forward with my regiment and one section of Etter's light artillery, Lieutenant J. C. Arnett commanding, to the suppor
Wyatt C. Thomas (search for this): chapter 47
, was enabled to render me important assistance up to the time of the withdrawal of my troops from the field. Captain Wyatt C. Thomas, Assistant Adjutant-General of the brigade, was, as usual, at his post. The conduct of this young officer has o. Report of Colonel King. Heaquarters King's regiment Arkansas infantry, camp at Searcy, July 22, 1863. Captain Wyatt C. Thomas: Sir: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my regiment in the late battle foughgiment. Report of Colonel Brooke. headquarters Brooks' regiment, camp near Cotton Plant, July 10, 1863. Captain Wyatt C. Thomas, Assistant Adjutant-General Second Brigade: Captain: I have the honor to report the following as the part taknt, W. H. Brooks, Colonel, commanding. Report of Colonel Bell's regiment. camp Bayou Deview, July 10, 1863. Captain Thomas: Captain: I have the honor to make my report of the part taken by Bell's regiment in the engagement of the fourth
J. F. Fagan (search for this): chapter 47
the enemy abundant notice of my approach. General Fagan arrived at his place of rendezvous (ClarenThat officer was nowhere to be seen, while General Fagan, with greatly reduced force, was being asss effects of this galling fire, was to aid General Fagan to take the enemy's works upon my right, athat I could not send any effective aid to General Fagan, without too greatly endangering my own po unless such aid could be promptly sent to General Fagan, the general attack upon Helena must fail.ts and works, which were being attacked by General Fagan, aiming to make as great a diversion as poith much respect, Your obedient servant, J. F. Fagan, Brigadier-General. Report of Colonel Kuld not go on. While in this situation, General Fagan ordered me to take the fort, but the men w reported the enemy in sight. By order of General Fagan I moved my regiment in double-quick by theen o'clock A. M., I received an order from General Fagan to withdraw my regiment from the field. I[33 more...]
eld without orders. Having been ordered by General Holmes to the part of the field upon which General Fagan's brigade fought, I was unable to communicate with Major-General Price, but when he left all effort upon our part had ceased. My loss is as follows: Killed, forty-six; wounded, one hundred and sixty-eight; missing, one hundred and thirty-three; total, three hundred and forty-seven. For further particulars reference is made to list, which is respectfully submitted. Respectfully, D. Mcrae, Brigadier-General Official: Thomas L. Snead, Major and A. A. G. Report of General Fagan. Hradquarters Second brigade, &c., camp at Searcy, Arkansas, July 21, 1863. Major W. B. Blair, A. A. A. General, Headquarters District of Arkansas, &c.: Major: I have the honor to report as follows in regard to the part taken by my brigade in the attack on Helena, upon the fourth instant: On the evening of the third instant, at dark, I ordered Colonel Brooks, with his regiment, one sect
R. H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 47
In Pindall's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The following is a summary of my losses in each regiment, battalion, and the artillery detachment: Seventh regimentKilled17  Wounded126  Missing54--197 Eighth regimentKilled14  Wounded82  Missing67--163 Ninth regimentKilled7  Wounded53--60 Tenth regimentKilled11  Wounded41  Missing237--289 Pindall's sharps'trsK
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