hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Brinton McClellan 261 5 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 174 6 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 170 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 149 5 Browse Search
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard 122 0 Browse Search
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) 111 3 Browse Search
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
Thomas Jonathan Jackson 101 1 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 90 10 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 85 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 681 total hits in 139 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
staff of General McClellan. Officially merely guests at headquarters, they acted as aides-de-Camp to McClellan, bearing despatches and the like, frequently under fire. They distinguished themselves at the battle of Gaines' Mill. The Prince de Joinville made a painting of that engagement which became widely published. Learning the game In the lower picture the Count de Paris and the Duc de Chartres are trying their skill at dominoes after dinner. Captain Leclerc, on the left, and Captain Mohain, on the right, are of their party. A Union officer has taken the place of the Prince de Joinville. It was to perfect their skill in a greater and grimmer game that these young men came to America. At Yorktown they could see the rehabilitated fortifications of Cornwallis, which men of their own blood had helped to seize, now amplified by the latest methods of defensive warfare. Exposed to the fire of the Napoleon field pieces imported by the Confederacy, they could compare their effec
Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (search for this): chapter 2.8
hs after Bull Run; Rosecrans' army for five months after Murfreesboro, and Grant's army for four months after Vicksburg, while Grant's army was almost in the same class during its ten months before Petersburg. The concentration of scattered forces at decisive points, which is technically called in the text-book the use of interior lines, and in more homely phrase, getting there first with the most men, was often skilfully performed on both a large and small scale. Thus, Johnston joined Beauregard at Bull Run in time to win the battle; Jackson alternately attacked the divided forces of his opponents and neutralized their greatly superior forces, and finally joined Lee for another campaign; Longstreet joined Bragg to win Chickamauga; Ewell joined Breckinridge to defeat Sigel. Many opportunities were lost, even in the very campaigns mentioned, as we see them to-day. The conduct of pursuits confirms the idea that it is the most difficult operation presented to a general. Johnston
Ulric Dahlgren (search for this): chapter 2.8
im a universal favorite. The other men are Americans, conspicuous actors as well as students in the struggle. On the ground, to the left, sits Major Ludlow, who commanded the colored brigade which, and under his direction, in the face of a continual bombardment, dug Dutch Gap Canal on the James. The man in the straw hat is Lieut. Colonel Dickinson, Assistant Adjutant General to Hooker, a position in which he served until the Battle of Gettysburg, where he was wounded. Standing is Captain Ulric Dahlgren, serving at the time on Meade's staff. Even the loss of a leg could not quell his indomitable spirit, and he subsequently sacrificed his life in an effort to release the Federal prisoners at Libby and Belle Isle. generalship. It means the art of the general and indicates the time, place, and way to fight battles. The War of the States was viewed at first with indifference by foreign military men. For many years past, however, it has claimed their close attention, because they h
t for lateral communication, and the South had several running north and south in each section, which could be used for lines of military-operations. In respect to water routes, the North soon demonstrated its complete control of the sea and was thus able to choose its points of attack, while interior water routes were available by the Mississippi, Tennessee, Cumberland, and James rivers. The advantage of the water route over that by rail was at once utilized by the Northern generals. A King's son in camp In 1861 there arrived the first great opportunity to study warfare in the field since the campaigns of Napoleon, and these young men of royal blood expected at no distant day to be the leaders of a war of their own to recover the lost Bourbon throne of France. The three distinguished guests of the Army of the Potomac seated at the farther end of the Camp dinner-table are, from right to left, the Prince de Joinville, son of King Louis Phillipe, and his two nephews, the Count
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 2.8
mprehension of its immutable principles add a new interest to the records of stirring times and great achievements, but will make him a more useful citizen.--Stonewall Jackson and the Civil War, by Lieutenant-Colonel G. F. R. Henderson, C. B. The student has great advantage over the actor in war, particularly when he makes his generals to seek the flank rather than the front attack. The Shenandoah valley afforded a safe approach to Washington from the rear. This was availed of by Lee, Jackson, and Early to keep many thousand men of the army of the North in idleness. In the West, the long line defended by scattered troops was weak at every point and wae enemy's territory. The scene is of the dismantled bridge across Armstrong Run. Driving General Banks' forces up the Valley and forcing him across the Potomac, Jackson saved Richmond from McClellan in 1862. Up the Valley came Lee the following year, striking terror to the North by the invasion that was only checked at Gettysbur
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 2.8
March to the Sea was only less remarkable than Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania under similar condit he can. Under the head of policy would come Lee's several invasions of the North, undertaken wiplicity at a later period, in the Wilderness by Lee and at Spottsylvania by Grant. Thus it was tha the Potomac was at first superior in number to Lee's army of Northern Virginia. It could have beeerve to defend Washington. He then outnumbered Lee in the field. A defender of the Federal capie, also, in the fall of 1862, marched away from Lee's army when he went to Fredericksburg. Wherousand miles and was several hundred miles from Lee at the end of the campaign. If Lee's army had The other causes would take long to analyze. Lee made six campaigns in fourteen months, from Mayeir greatly superior forces, and finally joined Lee for another campaign; Longstreet joined Bragg tes no mistakes never goes to war. The critic of Lee finds it hard to detect mistakes. No general s[19 more...]
A. S. Johnston (search for this): chapter 2.8
are disposed to suspect that Atlanta, rather than Johnston's army, was Sherman's main objective. Later, thground we see the formidable defenses behind which Johnston held the railroad bridge over the Chattahoochee ag the strategy of Alexander at the Hydaspes. While Johnston with all his forces save cavalry was lying menaciny shifted the main body of his army to the left of Johnston's position, crossed the river on pontoons and immediately established a tete du pont of his own in Johnston's rear capable of withstanding his entire force. There was nothing for Johnston but to retreat upon Atlanta, burning the bridge behind him. In the picture is the performed on both a large and small scale. Thus, Johnston joined Beauregard at Bull Run in time to win the b most difficult operation presented to a general. Johnston after Bull Run, McClellan after Antietam, Meade afwn to the statement that Lee, Jackson, and perhaps Johnston handled inferior forces with as great skill as any
it would have taken Buell into eastern Tennessee, instead of to the assistance of Grant and would have changed the course of events in the Mississippi valley. Three months later, it was one of the potent influences that led to the breaking up of Halleck's army at Corinth. It finally caused Buell's relief from command because of his disapproval. It caused Burnside's army to be absent from the battle of Chickamauga. In 1864, the campaigns of Price in Missouri and Hood in Tennessee are said tssible would now be considered the correct solution of that problem. It is well known that Lincoln disapproved of McClellan's plan, whether by the counsel of wise military advisers or by his own common sense we know not. Again, in 1862, when Halleck with much trouble and skill had collected a great army of one hundred thousand men at Corinth, the army was dispersed, contrary to his desire, it appears, and the true objective was lost. The Confederate leader repaired his losses and soon reco
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): chapter 2.8
ederal engineers at Vibbard Draw on Long Bridge at Washington busily at work rehabilitating a locomotive for use along the railroad connections of the capital with its army. Extemporized wooden structures of that time seem paltry in comparison with the great steel cranes and derricks which our modern wrecking trains have made familiar. The railroads in control of the North were much better equipped and guarded than those of the South, yet the bold Confederate Cavalry, under such leaders as Stuart, were ever ready for raids to cut communications. How thoroughly they did their work whenever they got the chance, the lower picture tells. Work of the Engineers and the Cavalry After a raid on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad thousand men away from McClellan; Early's march on Washington, and many cavalry raids. The result of a study of objectives shows that, with good troops, and safe, but not brilliant, generals on both sides, the only way to overthrow the opponent is to att
Captain, and assigned them to the staff of General McClellan. Officially merely guests at headquarters, they acted as aides-de-Camp to McClellan, bearing despatches and the like, frequently under fire. They distinguished themselves at the battle of Gaines' Mill. The Prince de Joinville made a painting of that engagement which became widely published. Learning the game In the lower picture the Count de Paris and the Duc de Chartres are trying their skill at dominoes after dinner. Captain Leclerc, on the left, and Captain Mohain, on the right, are of their party. A Union officer has taken the place of the Prince de Joinville. It was to perfect their skill in a greater and grimmer game that these young men came to America. At Yorktown they could see the rehabilitated fortifications of Cornwallis, which men of their own blood had helped to seize, now amplified by the latest methods of defensive warfare. Exposed to the fire of the Napoleon field pieces imported by the Confedera
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...