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ed......1796 Keene sentinel established at Keene......March, 1799 New Hampshire Missionary Society, the earliest charitable society of a religious character in the State, incorporated......1801 Farmer's cabinet published at Amherst......Nov. 11, 1802 First cotton factory in State erected at New Ipswich......1803 Piscataqua Evangelical magazine published at Portsmouth......1805 Law passed dividing towns into school districts......1805 From the preaching and teachings of Mr. Murray in 1773, the Universalists are recognized as a religious sect in New Hampshire......June 13, 1805 From 1680 to 1775 the seat of government was at Portsmouth. From 1775 to 1807 the legislature adjourned from town to town, assembling at Exeter, Concord, Hopkinton, Dover, Amherst, Charlestown, and Hanover. The legislature of 1807 adjourns from Hopkinton to Concord for regular sessions......1807 New Hampshire Iron Factory Company, incorporated at Franconia in 1805, erects and puts in
ampshire by Queen Anne......1701 An attack of Indians on Durham is repulsed by a few women in disguise firing upon the Indians, who suppose the place well garrisoned......April, 1706 Indian hostilities cease on the arrival of news of the treaty of Utrecht, and a treaty ratified with them......July 11, 1713 George Vaughan made lieutenant-governor and Samuel Shute commander-in chief of the province......Oct. 13, 1716 Vaughan superseded by John Wentworth, by commission signed by Joseph Addison, English Secretary of State......Dec. 7, 1717 Sixteen Scottish families settle at Londonderry, and the first Presbyterian church in New England is organized by Rev. James McGregorie......1719 Capt. John Lovewell makes his first excursion against the Indians in New Hampshire......December, 1724 A grant of land made by New Hampshire to the survivors of the Lovewell defeat at Fryeburg, Me., overlaps a similar grant by Massachusetts in Bow county, which leads to a boundary litigatio
8 feet in height, cast at Munich, and gift of Benjamin P. Cheney, is erected in the State-house park, Concord, and dedicated......June 17, 1886 For governor: David H. Goodell, Republican, 44,809 votes; Charles H. Amsden, Democrat, 44,093; Edgar L. Carr, Prohibition, 1,567; the choice devolves upon the legislature......November, 1888 State constitutional convention meets at Concord, Jan. 2, 1889; among the seven amendments submitted to the people one favoring prohibition is lost......Marcndler, unveiled in the State-house yard, Concord......Aug. 31, 1892 John Greenleaf Whittier, born 1807, dies at Hampton Falls......Sept. 7, 1892 Vote for governor: John B. Smith, Republican, 43,676; Luther F. McKinney, Democrat, 41,501; Edgar L. Carr, Prohibition, 1,563; scattering, 320......November, 1892 Insane asylum at Dover burned; forty-five lives lost......Feb. 9, 1893 Monument to Maj.-Gen. John Sullivan, erected by legislative authority, dedicated at Durham......Sept. 27, 18
91; Henry O. Kent, Democrat, 33,959; Daniel C. Knowles, Prohibition, 1,750; scattering, 856......November, 1894 State library and Supreme Court building erected at a cost of $300,000, dedicated at Concord......Jan. 8, 1895 Vote for governor: George A. Ramsdell, Republican, 48,387; Henry O. Kent, Democrat, 28,333; John C. Berry, Prohibition, 1,057; scattering, 1,015......November, 1896 Vote for governor: Frank W. Rollins, Republican, 44,730; Charles F. Stone, Democrat, 35,653; Augustus G. Stevens, Prohibition, 1,333; scattering, 749......November, 1898 Ex-Gov. Frederick Smith dies......April 22, 1899 Old Home Week first celebrated in fifty cities and towns......August, 1899 Seventy towns celebrate Old Home Week......August, 1900 Joint presentation of bronze tablets to battle-ships Kearsarge and Alabama by people of New Hampshire, Governor Johnston and staff, of Alabama, attending, at Portsmouth......September, 1900 Vote for governor: Chester B. Jordan, Republ
ne asylum at Dover burned; forty-five lives lost......Feb. 9, 1893 Monument to Maj.-Gen. John Sullivan, erected by legislative authority, dedicated at Durham......Sept. 27, 1894 Vote for governor: Charles A. Busiel, Republican. 46,491; Henry O. Kent, Democrat, 33,959; Daniel C. Knowles, Prohibition, 1,750; scattering, 856......November, 1894 State library and Supreme Court building erected at a cost of $300,000, dedicated at Concord......Jan. 8, 1895 Vote for governor: George A. Ramsdell, Republican, 48,387; Henry O. Kent, Democrat, 28,333; John C. Berry, Prohibition, 1,057; scattering, 1,015......November, 1896 Vote for governor: Frank W. Rollins, Republican, 44,730; Charles F. Stone, Democrat, 35,653; Augustus G. Stevens, Prohibition, 1,333; scattering, 749......November, 1898 Ex-Gov. Frederick Smith dies......April 22, 1899 Old Home Week first celebrated in fifty cities and towns......August, 1899 Seventy towns celebrate Old Home Week......August, 1900
sioners, from the councillors of the neighboring provinces, to decide the question; board meets at Hampton......August, 1737 Commissioners fix upon the present eastern boundary of New Hampshire. For the southern boundary an appeal is made to George III., who decides upon the present line, giving New Hampshire a territory 50 miles long by 14 broad in excess of her claim......March 5, 1740 Bennington Wentworth appointed governor and commander-in-chief of New Hampshire......1741 George Whitefield preaches in New Hampshire......1744 Indian depredations in the New Hampshire settlements; attacks on Keene, Number Four (Charlestown), Rochester, capture of Fort Massachusetts at Hoosuck......April–Aug. 20, 1746 Three companies of rangers under Robert Rogers and the two brothers John and William Stark, formed from the New Hampshire troops by the express desire of Lord Loudon......1756 First newspaper in New Hampshire and the oldest in New England, New Hampshire Gazette, publis
during the recess of the council, as president of New Hampshire......1776 John Sullivan, of New Hampshire, appointed brigadier-general by Congress......1776 Ship-of-war Raleigh built at Portsmouth by decree of Congress......1776 A convention of both houses reports a declaration of independence, which was adopted and sent forthwith to the delegates of New Hampshire in Congress......June 15, 1776 Declaration of Independence of the United States signed by Josiah Bartlett and William Whipple, of New Hampshire, Aug. 2, 1776, and by a third representative from the State, Matthew Thornton......November, 1776 New Hampshire troops engage in the battle of Bennington, under John Stark, who is made brigadier-general by Congress......Aug. 18, 1777 Articles of Confederation ratified by New Hampshire, March 4, 1778, and signed by the State representatives at Philadelphia, Josiah Bartlett and John Wentworth......Aug. 8, 1778 Phillips Academy at Exeter founded......1781 Dani
e a royal province reaches Portsmouth......Jan. 1, 1680 President Cutts dies, and is succeeded by Maj. Richard Waldron, of Dover......April 5, 1681 Mason surrenders one-fifth of his quit rents from the province to Charles II., and thus secures the appointment of Edward Cranfield as lieutenant-governor, with extraordinary powers and devoted to his interests......Jan. 25, 1682 Cranfield suspends Waldron and Richard Martyn, both popular leaders, from the council......May 15, 1682 Edward Gove, voicing the popular feeling against Governor Cranfield, with a tumultuous body from Exeter and Hampton, declares for liberty and reform. Finding the people not yet ready for revolt, he surrenders, is convicted of high treason, and imprisoned in the Tower of London......1683 People, called upon by the governor to take leases from Mason, refuse to acknowledge his claim......Feb. 14, 1683 Assembly refuse money for the Cranfield government......1684 Cranfield, by authority of the g
divisional line, takes from the Plymouth council a patent of that portion lying between that river and the Merrimac, and calls it New Hampshire......Nov. 7, 1629 Company of Laconia dividing their interests, Mason procures for himself a charter of Portsmouth......1631 Towns of Portsmouth and Northam laid out......1633 A number of families from England settle on Dover Neck and build a fortified church......1633 Mason's estate, after a few specific bequests, goes to a grandson, Robert Tufton, who takes the surname of Mason......1635 George Burdet, a clergyman from Yarmouth, England, succeeds Wiggin as governor of the Dover plantations......1636 Rev. John Wheelwright, banished from Boston as a result of the Antinomian controversy, and a few friends settle Exeter, and form a government with elections by the people......1638 Hampton, considered as belonging to the colony of Massachusetts, founded......1638 Burdet succeeded by Capt. John Underhill......1638 People
e payment, obtains a leave of absence, and returns to England, Walter Barefoot, his deputy, succeeding as chief magistrate......Jan. 9, 1685 Indians attack Dover; surprise Major Waldron in his own home, and massacre him and many other settlers, taking twenty-nine captives, whom they sell as slaves to the French in Canada......Jan. 27, 1689 People of New Hampshire effect a governmental union with Massachusetts......March 12, 1690 New Hampshire is purchased from the Mason heirs by Samuel Allen, of London, who prevents its insertion in the charter of William and Mary, and becomes its governor, appointing his son-in-law, John Usher, as lieutenant-governor......March 1, 1692 Law passed requiring each town to provide a school-master, Dover excepted, it then being too much impoverished by Indian raids to do so......1693 Sieur de Villieu, and 250 Indians, approach Durham undiscovered, and, waiting in ambush during the night, at sunrise attack the place, destroy five houses, and
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