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R. W. Barnwell (search for this): chapter 8
e selection of Colonel Rhett's successor. He was solicitous that none but an officer of undoubted coolness and courage should take the place of the gallant commander, whose sphere of duty, now changed, called him and his artillerists to the land batteries, whither most of Sumter's heavy guns had already been transferred and mounted. Fifty days elapsed before the second bombardment of Fort Sumter commenced. Major Stephen Elliott, from Beaufort, South Carolina, was a relative of the Hon. R. W. Barnwell, of Bishop Stephen Elliott, and of Colonel Alfred Rhett. He was a young officer of well-earned esteem, modest, thoroughly self-possessed, and dauntless, and his family connections were influential in the State. He was, therefore, worthy of the confidence reposed in him by the Commanding General. The incident of his interview with the latter, previous to his assignment to the command of Sumter, is worthy of record. You are to be sent to a fort, said General Beauregard, deprived
Johnson Hagood (search for this): chapter 8
: Tell Admiral Dahlgren to come and take it. General Hagood's narrative of the defence of Morris Island. wish of the Commanding General that you call on Generals Hagood, Colquitt, and Taliaferro, and Colonels Keitt amust arrange, through you, with Generals Ripley and Hagood and Flag-officer Tucker, of the navy, some definiteFla., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 30th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. Johnson Hagood, Comdg., etc., James Island, S. C.: Ge desirable. This order was also sent to Brigadier-General Hagood. Respectfully, your obedient servant, hile he spoke; not one word of Generals Taliaferro, Hagood, Colquitt, and Ripley, of Colonels Rhett, Butler, Hnses and lines in and about Charleston. From General Hagood's narrative of the defence of James and Morris nd. General Taliaferro was absent on leave, and General Hagood in command. Mr. Davis inspected the works closrs for Mr. President by simply raising his hat. General Hagood rode with him, as commander of the island, and
Samuel Cooper (search for this): chapter 8
ifty to two hundred rounds of shot to the gun. There are now only one hundred and twenty-eight. Finally, the General directs me to say that there is too much powder at Fort Ripley. The surplus will be removed to Castle Pinckney, if required there for its three guns, one of which will be added to its present arrangement. Very respectfully, your obdt. servt., Clifton H. Smith, Asst. Adjt.-Genl. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 30th, 1863. General Samuel Cooper, Adjt. and Insp.-General, Richmond, Va.: General,—The published report of Brigadier-General Gillmore, of the 7th instant, to his government, relative to his acquisition of Batteries Wagner and Gregg, contains several errors, which I feel called upon to correct. 1st. Seventy-five men were not taken on Morris Island, for only two boats' crews—about 19 men and 27 sailors, or about 46 men in all—were captured by the enemy's armed barges between Cummings's Point and Fort Sumter. <
A. N. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 8
vor to have the prisoners removed in the course of the day or to-night. Should, meanwhile, the enemy bombard Sumter, and you have not enough cover for your command, you will expose the prisoners, instead of your troops, to the enemy's fire. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. N. T. Beauregard, A. D. C. The events succeeding those we have just related—but which are, relatively, of minor importance—are sufficiently explained by the following letters and instructions of General Beauregard to his subordinate officers, to the War Department, and to generals and citizens of note in South Carolina and elsewhere: Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 10th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—I am instructed to inform you of the arrival from Richmond of a party of one hundred and thirty officers and men, under the command of Lieutenant Rochelle, C. S. N. These men were ordered here for ha<
T. A. Huguenin (search for this): chapter 8
rces of the enemy. It was a grave responsibility to assume, but General Beauregard resolutely took it upon himself; and thus, through him and those who defended Sumter, does its record remain, from Rhett to Elliott, from Elliott to Mitchel and Huguenin, and the men who fought under them, a grand story of engineering skill, soldierly daring, fortitude, and endurance. Thus, also, as was eloquently said by General B. H-. Rutledge, in an address delivered in Charleston, November 30th, 1882, onntil the 20th of July, 1864, when, during the third regular bombardment of Sumter, he was killed by a mortar-shell. Captain Mitchel was a son of the distinguished Irish patriot, and a highly accomplished and daring officer. On his death Captain T. A. Huguenin, of the South Carolina Infantry (Regulars), was appointed in his place, and held command of Sumter until its evacuation, on the 17th of February, 1865—nearly eight months after General Elliott had been relieved. The evacuation of Sumter
Stephen D. Elliott (search for this): chapter 8
he hope and spirits of the South. The officers and men had signally distinguished themselves during that desperate and glorious siege. Several of them had been justly recommended for promotion. Yet he found but a single one to praise—Major Stephen D. Elliott, the recently chosen commander of Sumter, placed there after the first bombardment was over and the regular artillery withdrawn. Not one word of General Beauregard, who stood at his elbow while he spoke; not one word of Generals Taliafes did they fight? These are questions as to which complete silence is preserved; and from what follows the reader is led to believe that the Commanding General was General Hardee, and that Fort Sumter was never under any officer except Colonel Stephen D. Elliott. We quote: When the city was about to be abandoned to the army of General Sherman the forts defending the harbor were embraced in General Hardee's plan of evacuation. The gallant commander of Fort Sumter, Colonel Stephen Elliott,
John F. O'Brien (search for this): chapter 8
mize our ammunition and guns as much as possible for a long siege. It is the wish of the Commanding General that Fort Sumter be furnished with disinfectants, and that one company of the garrison be changed weekly. He further directs that you send a detachment of Earle's battery, under Captain Earle, with the larger Foote gun, to Buckingham Ferry, for the purpose of annoying the enemy's communication between Fort Pulaski and Hilton Head. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, John F. O'Brien, Major, and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 23d, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,--It is the wish of the Commanding General that you call on Generals Hagood, Colquitt, and Taliaferro, and Colonels Keitt and Harrison, to furnish the names of such officers and men who have specially distinguished themselves for zeal and gallantry in the discharge of their duties on Morris Island during the t
of these should be kept under arms during the night, as barges can come within fifty yards without being seen. Colonel Gilmer: The defensive capacity of the fort is sufficient, if garrisoned with three hundred effective men, giving them the assistance of splinter-proof cover and sand-bag epaulements. Fourth proposition. Power of the fort to preserve its present defensive condition against probable attacks. Lieutenant Johnson: Against the probable combined attacks of the fleet Parrott guns and mortars—thirty-six hours. Captain Harleston: Agrees with Lieutenant Johnson. Major Blanding: Against a combined vigorous attack—twelve hours. Colonel Harris: Cannot undertake to answer as regards time. Colonel Rhett: The eastern wall is much shattered by fire of the 7th of April, and has never been repaired, except two casemates which have been rebuilt with new masonry; the wall has been reinforced in the casemates with sand-bags; it has also been seriously damaged by
Alfred Roman (search for this): chapter 8
then existing between that officer and his subordinate commanders, and to suggest Longstreet's assault on Knoxville. While returning to Richmond he stopped a day or two in Savannah and Charleston, and made it a point to inspect some of their defensive works and the gallant troops manning them. Unable to go in person to welcome the President upon his arrival in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, General Beauregard sent several members of his staff—among whom were Colonel Roman and Lieutenant Chisolm—to perform that duty and accompany the distinguished visitor to Charleston. He reached there on the 2d of November, at about 1 P. M., and found General Beauregard awaiting him at the depot, or what served as such, with an imposing military escort. There was also a deputation of citizens, appointed by the civil authorities, to offer him the hospitalities of the city. But he declined their invitation, having already promised a personal friend—ex-Governor Aiken— t
B. F. Butler (search for this): chapter 8
ad signally distinguished themselves during that desperate and glorious siege. Several of them had been justly recommended for promotion. Yet he found but a single one to praise—Major Stephen D. Elliott, the recently chosen commander of Sumter, placed there after the first bombardment was over and the regular artillery withdrawn. Not one word of General Beauregard, who stood at his elbow while he spoke; not one word of Generals Taliaferro, Hagood, Colquitt, and Ripley, of Colonels Rhett, Butler, Harris, Keitt, and Harrison, or of the brave men who fought with and under them, was said by Mr. Davis, the Commander-in-chief of the land and naval forces of the Confederate States. The President was speaking to Carolinians, in the heart of their devoted city. Such was his justice to those whose genius, courage, and unsurpassed fortitude had attracted the admiration of Europe and the respect of their enemies. When the reception was over Governor Aiken invited the Mayor, some of the le
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