hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
New England (United States) 160 0 Browse Search
Ralph Waldo Emerson 138 0 Browse Search
Edgar Allan Poe 114 0 Browse Search
Nathaniel Hawthorne 100 0 Browse Search
Walt Whitman 88 0 Browse Search
John Greenleaf Whittier 86 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 84 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Franklin 66 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell 60 0 Browse Search
Washington Irving 56 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters. Search the whole document.

Found 505 total hits in 180 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
James G. Blaine (search for this): chapter 7
red more poems, for he lived to be eighty-five, and he composed until the last. But his creative period was now over. He rejoiced in the friendly recognition of his work that came to him from every section of a reunited country. His personal friends were loyal in their devotion. He followed the intricacies of American politics with the keen zest of a veteran in that game, for in his time he had made and unmade governors and senators. The greatest politician I have ever met, said James G. Blaine, who had certainly met many. He had an income from his poems far in excess of his needs, but retained the absolute simplicity of his earlier habits. When his publishers first proposed the notable public dinner in honor of his seventieth birthday he demurred, explaining to a member of his family that he did not want the bother of buying a new pair of pants --a petty anecdote, but somehow refreshing. So the rustic, shrewd, gentle old man waited for the end. He had known what it means t
Wordsworth (search for this): chapter 7
nitarian passion: lyrics in praise of fellow-workers, salutes to the dead, campaign songs, hymns, satires against the clergy and the capitalists, superb sectional poems like Massachusetts to Virginia, and, more nobly still, poems embodying what Wordsworth called the sensation and image of country and the human. race. Whittier had now found himself as a poet. It is true that his style remained diffuse and his ear faulty, but his countrymen, then as now uncritical of artistic form, overlooked suffrage a failure; a nineteenth century historian who cared nothing for philosophy, science, or the larger lessons of history itself; a fascinating realistic writer who admired Scott, Byron, and Cooper for their tales of action, and despised Wordsworth and Thoreau as effeminate sentimentalists who were preoccupied with themselves. In Parkman the wheel has come full circle, and a movement that began with expansion of self ended in hard Spartan repression, even in inhibition of emotion. Bec
His last book was The life and death of John of Barneveld. His Letters, edited after his death in 1877 by George William Curtis, give a fascinating picture of English life among the cultivated and leisurely classes. The Boston merchant's son was a high-hearted gentleman, and his cosmopolitan experiences used to make his stay-at-home friend, Oliver Wendell Holmes, feel rather dull and provincial in comparison. Both were Sons of Liberty, but Motley had had the luck to find in brave little Holland a subject which captivated the interest of Europe and gave the historian international fame. He had more eloquence than the Doctor, and a far more varied range of prose, but there may be here and there a Yankee guesser about the taste of future generations who will bet on The Autocrat, after all. The character and career of Francis Parkman afford curious material to the student of New England's golden age. In the seventy years of his heroic life, from 1823 to 1893, all the characterist
hod precisely suited to his temperament. No American has approached Lowell's success in this difficult genre: the swift transitions from rural Yankee humor to splendid scorn of evil and to noblest idealism reveal the full powers of one of our most gifted men. The preacher lurked in this Puritan from first to last, and the war against Mexico and the Civil War stirred him to the depths. His prose, likewise, is a school of loyalty. There was much of Europe in his learning, as his memorable Dante essay shows, and the traditions of great English literature were the daily companions of his mind. He was bookish, as a bookman should be, and sometimes the very richness and whimsicality of his bookish fancies marred the simplicity and good taste of his pages. But the fundamental texture of his thought and feeling was American, and his most characteristic style has the raciness of our soil. Nature lovers like to point out the freshness and delicacy of his reaction to the New England sce
James Russell Lowell (search for this): chapter 7
a too genuine poetic instinct for the concrete; and Lowell and Holmes had the saving gift of humor. Cultivateor at Harvard, ultimately surrendering the chair to Lowell. He early published two prose volumes, Hyperion ansing. He had already performed the same office for Lowell. He lingered himself until the autumn of 1894, in Then came his great hour of good luck in 1857, when Lowell, the editor of the newly-established Atlantic monthished as utterly as Sam Johnson's London. James Russell Lowell was ten years younger than Holmes, and thougy personal moods and many tides of public feeling. Lowell drew intellectual stimulus from enormously wide rea loyal readers nevertheless feel in his criticism. Lowell was more richly endowed by nature and by breadth ofon to the New England scene. Thoreau himself, whom Lowell did not like, was not more veracious an observer ths of Hawthorne, the political verse of Whittier and Lowell, presupposed a keen, reflecting audience, mentally
George Bancroft (search for this): chapter 7
the past, and a diffusion of intellectual tastes throughout the community. It was no accident that Sparks and Ticknor, Bancroft and Prescott, Motley and Parkman, were Massachusetts men. Jared Sparks, it is true, inherited neither wealth nor leishe text, and this error of judgment has somewhat clouded his just reputation as a pioneer in historical research. George Bancroft, who was born in 1800, and died, a horseback-riding sage, at ninety-one, inherited from his clergyman father a tastemp speech by a sturdy Democratic orator of the Jacksonian period. But there was solid stuff in it, nevertheless, and as Bancroft proceeded, decade after decade, he discarded some of his rhetoric and philosophy of democracy and utilized increasingly sed his ten great volumes to six. Posterity will doubtless condense these in turn, as posterity has a way of doing, but Bancroft the historian realized his own youthful ambition with a completeness rare in the history of human effort and performed a
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (search for this): chapter 7
te Calendar, was graduated at Bowdoin, with Longfellow, in the class of 1825, and returned to Saleme his own. A college classmate of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow summed up the Portland boy's charact of his own people. When Couper's statue of Longfellow was dedicated in Washington, Hamilton Mabie s and the continental roll of its rivers. Longfellow's poetic service to his countrymen has thus in verse-witness the Tales of a Wayside Inn-Longfellow was not by nature a dramatist, and his trilo, but the confession of a lack of regard for Longfellow's verse must often be recognized as a confesr-experienced people who affect to patronize Longfellow assume toward John Greenleaf Whittier an airtherStocking. Whittier knew that his friend Longfellow was a better artist than himself, and he als, as more perfect artists like Hawthorne and Longfellow could never have done, the subtleties and potitute lectures in Boston, and was appointed Longfellow's successor at Harvard. He went to Europe a[5 more...]
Fenimore Cooper (search for this): chapter 7
e Longfellow assume toward John Greenleaf Whittier an air of deference. This attitude would amuse the Quaker poet. One can almost see his dark eyes twinkle and the grim lips tighten in that silent laughter in which the old man so much resembled Cooper's LeatherStocking. Whittier knew that his friend Longfellow was a better artist than himself, and he also knew, by intimate experience as a maker of public opinion, how variable are its judgments. Whittier represents a stock different from th as thoroughly as Alexander Hamilton, and thought suffrage a failure; a nineteenth century historian who cared nothing for philosophy, science, or the larger lessons of history itself; a fascinating realistic writer who admired Scott, Byron, and Cooper for their tales of action, and despised Wordsworth and Thoreau as effeminate sentimentalists who were preoccupied with themselves. In Parkman the wheel has come full circle, and a movement that began with expansion of self ended in hard Spartan
Boston Brahmin (search for this): chapter 7
documents upon which he relied have been proved less trustworthy than he thought, but this unsuspected defect in his materials scarcely impaired the skill with which this unhasting, unresting painter filled his great canvases. They need retouching, perhaps, but the younger historians are incompetent for the task. Prescott died in 1859, in the same year as Irving, and he already seems quite as remote from the present hour. His young friend Motley, of Dutch Republic fame, was another Boston Brahmin, born in the year of Prescott's graduation from college. IHe attended George Bancroft's school, went to Harvard in due course, where he knew Holmes, Sumner, and Wendell Phillips, and at Gottingen became a warm friend of a dog-lover and duelist named Bismarck. Young Motley wrote a couple of unsuccessful novels, dabbled in diplomacy, politics, and review-writing, and finally, encouraged by Prescott, settled down upon Dutch history, went to Europe to work up his material in 1851, and, aft
Newgate Calendar (search for this): chapter 7
h not in doctrine or in sympathy. His literary affiliations were with the English and German Romanticists, and he possessed, for professional use, the ideas and vocabulary of his transcendental friends. Born in Salem in 1804, he was descended from Judge Haw. thorne of Salem Witchcraft fame, and from a long line of sea-faring ancestors. He inherited a morbid solitariness, redeemed in some measure by a physical endowment of rare strength and beauty. He read Spenser, Rousseau, and the Newgate Calendar, was graduated at Bowdoin, with Longfellow, in the class of 1825, and returned to Salem for thirteen brooding lonely years in which he tried to teach himself the art of story-writing. His earliest tales, like Irving's, are essays in which characters emerge; he is absorbed in finding a setting for a preconceived moral ; he is in love with allegory and parable. His own words about his first collection of stories, Twice-told tales, have often been quoted: They have the pale tint of flow
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...